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ian16th
3rd Oct 2016, 14:37
Some years ago I purchased a product that consisted of hard plastic beads.

These beads were temperature sensitive, in that they softened in boiling water and hardened again as they cooled.

While hot/warm the material was shaped to use as a wall plug to take a wood screw, in irregular shaped holes.

I have a need for such a product, but cannot for the life of me remember its name.

Anyone out there know what I'm on about?

oopspff7
3rd Oct 2016, 15:47
Its possibly Polymorph you want.Can be found on Amazon.

ian16th
3rd Oct 2016, 15:58
That looks similar and will do the trick.

Many Thanks

gemma10
3rd Oct 2016, 16:34
Anyone know if this polymorph can take self tapping screws after it is moulded into the required shape? If so it could well have sorted a big problem.

sitigeltfel
3rd Oct 2016, 17:09
I never knew the stuff existed. Thanks for the tip. :ok:

ian16th
3rd Oct 2016, 17:14
Even better news!

The stuff is so expensive locally that I went into superdrive and thoroughly searched my garage and found:

http://i818.photobucket.com/albums/zz108/ian16th/Repair%20Minute.jpg
This brand was made in France.

I only need a very small amount for the job in hand, so I saved more than the price of a case of beer. :ok::ok:

Gemma,

I see no reason why it wouldn't take self tapping screws. But why would you need them ?

I've only used it in the past with ordinary wood screws.

ian16th
3rd Oct 2016, 17:26
Gemma,
Thinking about your self tapping screw requirement.

You might be able to pack the hot/flexible material around the self tapping screw, push into the hole, leave till cold/set and then unscrew the self tapping screw, then put the screw through whatever need fixing into the 'threaded' plastic.

Knowing the specifics of the job might clarify the thinking.

handsfree
3rd Oct 2016, 17:43
Thanks for starting this thread Ian16th.
I've been looking for something to protect the cable ends of
iPhone connectors on which the insulation always seems to split after a while.
This stuff should do the job a treat.
100gm for 3.19 with free delivery in the UK on Fleabay.

ricardian
3rd Oct 2016, 18:28
And there's this hand mouldable plastic (https://www.amazon.co.uk/Mouldable-Plastic-Polymorph-Fantastic-Thermoplastic/dp/B00CAL4BRU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1411556230&sr=8-1&keywords=fantastic+plastic)

NutLoose
4th Oct 2016, 00:02
Handsfree u need a biro, simples, see

http://aplus.com/a/3-tricks-to-keep-phone-charger-from-breaking?no_monetization=true

NutLoose
4th Oct 2016, 00:15
You might be able to pack the hot/flexible material around the self tapping screw, push into the hole, leave till cold/set and then unscrew the self tapping screw, then put the screw through whatever need fixing into the 'threaded' plastic.

That wouldn't necessarily work, when screwing into the material it really needs to expand as the screw cuts into it allowing it to expand into the hole it is filling thus gripping it, moulding it to the screw won't let that happen

G0ULI
4th Oct 2016, 02:48
An even cheaper source of material can be found in packs of glue sticks. The plastic used in hot melt glue guns is reputed to be the same as in the more expensive polymorph type materials.

Drop into freshly boiled water and wait for it to turn clear. Fish out with a fork and mould to the desired shape.

ian16th
4th Oct 2016, 09:49
Hands free

Someone sent this as a PM

4X Protector Saver Cover FOR Apple IPHONE5 5s 6 Lightning USB Charger Cable Cord | eBay (http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/221912346725?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&var=520804713401&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT)

ricardian
4th Oct 2016, 10:00
Here's another potential candidate (https://sugru.com/buy?)

ShyTorque
4th Oct 2016, 10:16
My favourite "fix" for putting in plastic wall plugs is to first put in a small amount of white liquid PVA glue (wood glue), to stabilise the plaster. It makes for a much stronger fixing and takes a few seconds to do.

If the plastic plug won't grip, such as if the plaster is weak and crumbly or the hole has been drilled slightly too large, put in the glue, poke in a piece or two of wooden matchstick and then finally the plastic plug. It will last the life of the wall.

I always use white PVA when fixing into plasterboard, again it makes a huge difference in the strength of the fixing and for the "screw in" type of plasterboard fixing it acts as a lubricant. :ok:

david1300
4th Oct 2016, 11:20
I was going to mention Sugru but Ricardian in post 14 above beat me to it. I've used this in quite a few places and it's good.

Piltdown Man
4th Oct 2016, 12:13
How much load will the plug be subjected to? If any sort of load is to be applied I'd use a a plug made of expoxy, such as Milliput. It does require a curing time but the plug will be strong and capable of taking a load.

PM

gemma10
4th Oct 2016, 13:15
Does anyone have a nephew or relative for that matter who is in to model R/C aircraft. Well, said nephew owns a 5ft 182 cessna made from that foamy stuff, which appears quite strong in itself, but the nosewheel fixings are a bit flimsy. Not flimsy any more I might add, cos said aircraft did a nose dive, tore off the steerable nosewheel fixings, converted the three bladed prop into a two bladed prop and bent the electric motor shaft..Whoops. I see this polymorph stuff as an ideal candidate to mould into the existing fuselage in order to attach said new components. Sorry for aviation content.

G0ULI
5th Oct 2016, 01:38
For those genuine iPhone cables that split after a year or less of use, Poundland in the UK sell replacement leads in a variety of colours for just 1. The cables are thicker than the original and surprisingly good quality for the price.

Beefing up the original cable at the plug with some mouldable plastic works too.

ashivraj
5th Oct 2016, 11:47
I've been lurking for a while and waiting for the right opportunity to make my first post, so hopefully this helps someone...

For iPhone leads - and MacBook chargers (the ones with the older 'L' shaped MagSafe, not the newer 'T' MagSafe) - heat shrink tubing around the danger zones works a treat. I've also added expandable braid sleeving to mine for added ruggedness (and the black sleeve looks better, to me, than Apple White).

Pontius Navigator
5th Oct 2016, 21:00
Son in Law tried a new product. Drill a large hole in the plaster board for the plug size, small is 15mm or so. The cylinder type plug is inserted, a screw driver then rotates two levers. The plug is tighteny in situ and a screw or whatever can then be screwed into the plug.

I'll try and get details.

ian16th
5th Oct 2016, 21:59
PN
Son in Law tried a new product. Drill a large hole in the plaster board for the plug size, small is 15mm or so. The cylinder type plug is inserted, a screw driver then rotates two levers. The plug is tighteny in situ and a screw or whatever can then be screwed into the plug.

I'll try and get details. The description fits these thingies:
GripIt Assorted Plasterboard Fixings 32 Pcs (http://www.screwfix.com/p/gripit-assorted-plasterboard-fixings-32-pcs/6165j)

At the price, they should be good.

G-CPTN
6th Oct 2016, 10:01
Early in my married life (from 1971) I used a sort of asbestos which was recommended for filling ragged holes.
'Rawl Plastic' was an asbestos fibre mix composed of dry white asbestos fibres, sold loose in a tin in a powder form. You mixed it with water and rolled it in a ball and plugged the wall. A small tamper and spike was supplied with the kit.
This putty worked very well and even with crumbly bricks it stayed put.
It was allowed to dry in situ before it hardened and was able to be drilled or screwed-into.
The hazard of the asbestos fibres means that the product is no longer available.

radeng
6th Oct 2016, 10:53
My first thought on this was gutta percha, but I don't know if you can still get it.

The Flying Pram
6th Oct 2016, 17:22
'Rawl Plastic' was an asbestos fibre mix composed of dry white asbestos fibres, sold loose in a tin in a powder formThat brings back memories! My father used to swear by it. I wonder how many holes filled by the stuff still exist? Just imagine the panic these days if some was discovered during renovation work...

jimtherev
7th Oct 2016, 16:20
I've still got half a packet of the stuff. Still excellent!

Pontius Navigator
7th Oct 2016, 18:51
Ian, well done, spot on. He hung a very large mirror (2-man lift) on two of these. It is still up a month later

Nervous SLF
8th Oct 2016, 00:08
Early in my married life (from 1971) I used a sort of asbestos which was recommended for filling ragged holes.
'Rawl Plastic' was an asbestos fibre mix composed of dry white asbestos fibres, sold loose in a tin in a powder form. You mixed it with water and rolled it in a ball and plugged the wall. A small tamper and spike was supplied with the kit.
This putty worked very well and even with crumbly bricks it stayed put.
It was allowed to dry in situ before it hardened and was able to be drilled or screwed-into.
The hazard of the asbestos fibres means that the product is no longer available.


From memory that stuff was standard issue for telephone installers with Post Office Telephones.
If water wasn't easily available saliva was a quick solution.

.