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View Full Version : Tims coming to Britain - what is Tims?


rotornut
23rd Sep 2016, 00:58
Brits befuddled by who or what is Tim Hortons - BBC News (http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-37412123)

obgraham
23rd Sep 2016, 05:22
A more "down to earth" place than Starbucks or Costa.

Canada's national institution. Wish we had more of them here in US!

sitigeltfel
23rd Sep 2016, 05:54
Oh good, that will address the dearth of coffee shops on the High Streets. :rolleyes:

ExSp33db1rd
23rd Sep 2016, 06:38
Oh good, that will address the dearth of coffee shops on the High Streets.

Personally I miss the Chicken Chalet, in Montreal, just not the same as KFC.

meadowrun
23rd Sep 2016, 07:50
We've got Tim's, this being the left corner of Canada and I don't get the attraction. Coffee is run of the mill, (get it?), "double-double" is childish as are their commercials, Timbits are, well I just don't get it and the doughnuts and muffins are half-fried/baked, trucked across half the country and then finished for presentation as "fresh". Now they're trying to be big on wraps. The mango freezit thingie is quite nice on a hot day and has one serving of fruit.

pattern_is_full
23rd Sep 2016, 08:05
ExSp33... uhh, Chicken Chalet is a kit-built chicken coop brand.

Swiss Chalet is the Canadian restaurant chain that originally focused on rotisserie chicken dinners. And I agree - really tasty!

sitigeltfel
23rd Sep 2016, 08:12
Will they be opening in Ireland, where the name "Tims" might not go down too well?

ExSp33db1rd
23rd Sep 2016, 08:48
Pattern_is_full .... thanks, I guess you're right, it was 35 years ago, just remember going down the hill from the Mont Royale Hotel, across St.Catherines, on the right ?

meadowrun
23rd Sep 2016, 08:51
St. Hubert BBQ?

UniFoxOs
23rd Sep 2016, 08:58
I wonder if anyone inthe Guvmint will have the forethought to make sure Tim pays us some taxes.

Sallyann1234
23rd Sep 2016, 10:07
Will they be opening in Ireland, where the name "Tims" might not go down too well?
Orange had that problem too!

ShyTorque
23rd Sep 2016, 10:32
All these coffee shops....

Whatever happened to the Thermos flask (and good old snap box, for that matter)?

Sallyann1234
23rd Sep 2016, 10:40
Whatever happened to the Thermos flask (and good old snap box, for that matter)?
They didn't come with free WiFi.

ExXB
23rd Sep 2016, 10:43
ExSp33... uhh, Chicken Chalet is a kit-built chicken coop brand.

Swiss Chalet is the Canadian restaurant chain that originally focused on rotisserie chicken dinners. And I agree - really tasty!

And has nothing Swiss about it, besides the name. You can get rotisserie chickens here, but it isn't 'typically' Swiss like rösti, raclette, cheese fondu, Birchermüesli or chocolate.

Tech Guy
23rd Sep 2016, 12:32
The mango freezit thingie is quite nice on a hot day and has one serving of fruit.

So does a nice glass of red wine.
I like to do my best to achieve the recommended "5 a day". :)

Loose rivets
23rd Sep 2016, 12:39
I hear the owner is really, really little.

ExXB
23rd Sep 2016, 18:30
Just don't ask what happened to the apostrophe in Horton's

The Nip
23rd Sep 2016, 18:45
They were always busy on the boardwalk at Kandahar.

GROUNDHOG
23rd Sep 2016, 18:58
Forget Timmies can we have a Cactus Club like the one in Nanaimo please?

MarcK
23rd Sep 2016, 19:19
I did wonder what happened to the apostrophe, and found this:
Tim Hortons was originally Tim Horton’s—as it seemingly should be. After all, the name refers to a doughnut and coffee shop owned (at least formerly) by Tim Horton and not a gathering of many Tim Hortons. But in 1977, after years of tense and sometimes violent demonstrations by pro-French Quebecers, the newly powerful Parti Québecois passed La charte de la langue française, or Bill 101, which made French the sole official language in Quebec. It became illegal for businesses to advertise English names at the risk of facing large fines; the apostrophe in Tim Horton’s is an exclusively English punctuation mark. So rather than adopt separate branding—on everything from signage to napkins—the company changed their name, worldwide, to Tim Hortons.

bnt
23rd Sep 2016, 19:47
Tim Hortons already has a presence in Ireland, as a coffee counter in some SPAR shops and petrol stations. The name is not a problem.

pattern_is_full
23rd Sep 2016, 20:27
EeXB said:

And has nothing Swiss about it, besides the name. You can get rotisserie chickens here, but it isn't 'typically' Swiss like rösti, raclette, cheese fondu, Birchermüesli or chocolate.

When you remember what we sell and consume as "Swiss" cheese, "French" fries, "English" muffins, "Canadian" bacon, and "Belgian" waffles - what can you expect? ;)

grizzled
23rd Sep 2016, 23:35
The Nip...

Yup, while it was open that location held the record for the most IceCaps sold in a day (the very tasty and very frozen Tim's version of an iced cappucino). We thoroughly enjoyed that treat every couple of days as we passed through Kandahar (also grabbing several boxes of doughnuts to take to our Canadian friends in various parts of the country). Ahhh, the good old days... ;)

Carbon Bootprint
24th Sep 2016, 01:37
Tim Hortons was originally Tim Horton’s—as it seemingly should be. After all, the name refers to a doughnut and coffee shop owned (at least formerly) by Tim Horton and not a gathering of many Tim Hortons. But in 1977, after years of tense and sometimes violent demonstrations by pro-French Quebecers, the newly powerful Parti Québecois passed La charte de la langue française, or Bill 101, which made French the sole official language in Quebec. It became illegal for businesses to advertise English names at the risk of facing large fines; the apostrophe in Tim Horton’s is an exclusively English punctuation mark. So rather than adopt separate branding—on everything from signage to napkins—the company changed their name, worldwide, to Tim Hortons.That's all pretty interesting, but how did McDonald's (http://www.mcdonalds.ca/ca/fr/our_story.html) apparently get around that? Grandfather clause? An ace lobbyist? :8

Metro man
24th Sep 2016, 06:06
McDonald's have gone after people using the name MacDonald's, but in Scotland Mc and Mac are regarded as different names.

ExXB
24th Sep 2016, 16:11
When you remember what we sell and consume as "Swiss" cheese

Er, what you know as Swiss (http://www.cheese.com/swiss/) cheese isn't. Our famous holed cheese is Gruyere (http://www.cheese.com/gruyere/), which doesn't taste anything like that stuff.

PS: Cuckcoo clocks are German, not Swiss.

ImageGear
24th Sep 2016, 17:35
No one I know in Montreal would even think of buying coffee at TH's. Or pretty well anything else for that matter. The quality was right down there with a Northern England Wimpy Bar but with an unde:rolleyes:served attitude.


Imagegear

MarcK
24th Sep 2016, 17:46
In Canada we ordered coffee at a TH, and paid for it. Then were told that the coffee machine was out of order -- which could be seen from the registers.

pattern_is_full
24th Sep 2016, 18:21
Er, what you know as Swiss (http://www.cheese.com/swiss/) cheese isn't.

That was my point. ;)

obgraham
24th Sep 2016, 18:41
No one I know in Montreal would even think of buying coffee at TH's. Or pretty well anything else for that matter. T
Imagegear
That must be why every time I stop at a Tim's, the line is out to the door.

evansb
24th Sep 2016, 19:48
It was originally just a doughnut shop. Many are open 24-hours.

Tim Hortons Inc. (known internationally as Tim Hortons Cafe and Bake Shop) is a Canadian-based multinational fast food restaurant, known for its coffee and doughnuts. It is also Canada's largest quick service restaurant chain; as of December 31, 2015, it had a total of 4,413 restaurants (24 company-owned and 4,389 franchised), including 3,660 restaurants in Canada, 650 in the United States, and 113 in the Middle East.

It was founded in 1964 in Hamilton, Ontario, by Canadian hockey player Tim Horton and Jim Charade, after an initial venture in hamburger restaurants. In 1967, Horton partnered with investor Ron Joyce, who assumed control over operations after Horton died in 1974. Joyce expanded the chain into a multimillion-dollar franchise. Charade left the organization in 1966 and briefly returned in 1970 and 1993 through 1996.

newfieboy
24th Sep 2016, 22:12
My companies main base is in Cochrane, Ontario. They really proud Horton was a Cochrane dude. Me,Je ne give a f&[email protected] pas. Service sucks 25 minutes last Sunday morning just to get a cup of tea to go, one person in front of me....Mind you with our per diem on base, only place we can afford!!!!

Metro man
25th Sep 2016, 00:26
In a blind taste test could anyone really tell the difference between a cup of coffee from any of these outlets ? Grind beans, pass hot water through under pressure, add hot milk.

McCafe does a pretty good cup of coffee cheaper than Starbucks/Seattle/Costa etc, of course you lack the prestige of being seen drinking in one of these places. Note I am referring to McCafe not McDonalds coffee which is brewed and served in a styrofoam cup with artificial creamer.

The best coffee I find tends to be from an independent specialist outlet. The one or two people running it have better quality control over the smaller volume of beans which in some cases they roast in house. Without having to pay a third of the cost of a cup in franchise fees they are usually cheaper. These outlets don't have the brand recognition of a large chain and rely on word of mouth and regular customers to stay in business. They don't bother with gimmicky caramel soy mocca lattes topped with whipped cream and generally deliver a better product.

I only buy coffee on trips away as I have a machine at home and refuse to pay franchise outlet prices for something I can easily make myself for a third of their price. I must have saved thousands by bringing my own coffee to work.

evansb
25th Sep 2016, 01:54
It is easy to differentiate the taste of Tim Hortons, McDonalds and Starbucks coffee. Easy.

Carbon Bootprint
25th Sep 2016, 18:03
McDonald's have gone after people using the name MacDonald's, but in Scotland Mc and Mac are regarded as different names.I guess that's typical big company behavior, but my original question remains unanswered.

If, as MarcK said:
the apostrophe in Tim Horton’s is an exclusively English punctuation mark ...and that is why there cannot be a Tim Horton's in Quebec, why is McDonald's apparently allowed an exemption to the law?

obgraham
25th Sep 2016, 20:33
if there cannot be a Tim Horton's in Quebec, why is McDonald's apparently allowed an exemption to the law?
As I understand it, no judgement in Quebec outlawed TimHorton's. In fact the rules say that if your brand is a family name and used elsewhere, it can retain the apostrophe. So McDonald's is not a violation.
Evidently TH was told they might be in violation, and changed their branding before any such determination.
Their argument is that it is a trend in English branding also. As in "Boots" and a raft of other company names throughout UK.

tdracer
26th Sep 2016, 15:18
In a blind taste test could anyone really tell the difference between a cup of coffee from any of these outlets ? Grind beans, pass hot water through under pressure, add hot milk.
Leave the milk out and you'll taste the difference...:rolleyes:
I never cease to be amazed at people that bitch about how bad American coffee is, as they dump large quantities of milk and sugar into their "good European" coffee to make it tolerable :ugh:

ExXB
26th Sep 2016, 17:59
Tdracer, most of us have our expressos, or ristrettos, black without sugar, or other sweetners. The only thing you should put into coffee is a biscotti.

Coffee here is a drink to savour after a meal. Not before, or during.

And of course, we have loads of expats around that drink it by the gallon with milk, cream and sugar. But we laugh at them.

tdracer
26th Sep 2016, 19:03
ExXB - I'm not talking about an after dinner espresso, I'm talking morning coffee (e.g. breakfast). Maybe I frequent the wrong places when visiting the UK or Europe, but I'm often the ONLY one at the table that doesn't add something to their coffee. Heck, in the UK, a morning coffee break often wasn't even proper brewed coffee - it was instant :eek:
BTW, while I also enjoy an after dinner coffee/espresso, I seldom indulge since it's pretty much a guarantee that I won't be able to sleep :rolleyes:

meadowrun
26th Sep 2016, 19:18
One of the nicer things about coffee is that everyone can have it as they like it. It doesn't care. However there are limits...


"The more complicated the order, the bigger the asshole. If you walk into a Starbucks and order a ‘decaf grande half soy half low-fat iced vanilla double-shot gingerbread cappuccino, extra dry, light ice, with one Sweet ‘n Low and one Nutra Sweet…ooooh, you are a huge asshole."


George Carlin

ExXB
26th Sep 2016, 20:11
The U.K. is not Europe! (Thank goodness).

A café au lait (renversé in Geneva), or a cappuccino is another story. I never add sugar, it simply isn't needed. But the blend of expresso and heated milk is another of life's pleasures.

And never, ever order one of these after 1200.

Geordie_Expat
26th Sep 2016, 21:19
Always one day in Preston, someone ordered a double latte blah-di-blah-di-blah, whereon the guy behind the counter turned and call out "One milk coffee". I thought the customer was going to cry. I did, with laughter.:D