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Pace
22nd Sep 2016, 15:55
Past 60 something changes and that Awful word retire seems to come up more and more in conversations.

" Are you thinking of retiring" Oh my God what are you talking about I still feel 30 inside, still want to do all the crazy stuff, start thinking of the plastic surgery, hair transplants, the last grab at youth before you become an old codger.

Trouble is that word RETIRE it conjures up being put out to grass, waiting for God you name it such a hated negative word or at least in my eyes

With multiple relationships being expected to work later and later into our 70s and life expectancy increasing can we please bin that word RETIRE

OK I am changing my life direction! Taking on new challenges, doing what I want to do but please! RETIRE ??? get stuffed

When someone mentions that word I look blank as if I had never heard it before " sorry what does that mean ?" Ummm are you thinking of stopping? "
" Well the Old heart was still ticking a few minutes ago is that what you mean"

" Sod off you retire if you want theres a nice field I know of you can make yourself old by thinking yourself old and become totally boring

What do you lot think bin that retro word RETIRE and pick something new more positive ?

" You should grow old gracefully"

" Sod off I will grow older totally ungracefully thank you very much ))

VP959
22nd Sep 2016, 16:20
I "retired" at 58 years of age. Best thing I ever did. I have absolutely no idea where I ever used to find the time to go to work, as I seem to have too many things to do and insufficient "free" time now.

KenV
22nd Sep 2016, 16:21
A retire to bed every night and usually really enjoy it.

Stanwell
22nd Sep 2016, 16:52
What I really do like is...
Being able to, when confronted by an unduly nosey and in-your-face person at a social gathering, respond positively by simply saying...
"I'm retired." ..
(so, far-cough!)

jimtherev
22nd Sep 2016, 17:03
I thought the title was an invitation, which got me wondering which dictionary word I would like to retire. I've come up with, errr.... I'm not sure what I've come up with. So many words, so little time.

LowNSlow
22nd Sep 2016, 17:38
I like the word and I enjoyed saying it at dinner parties etc!

I thought my retirement was permanent when the price of crude oil went through the floor and I thouroughly enjoyed remodelling the garden, watching a development being built and flying when the opporchancity arose. My rolls and split S's were getting quite good!!

Then disaster, an offer I couldn't refuse. My idyll is over, at least for a couple of years :(

Now I am sitting in Geneva Airport waiting for my flight home for the weekend.......

vapilot2004
22nd Sep 2016, 18:08
I understand the practice (in both the phonetic and true sense of the word) saves airlines millions of dollars every year. :8

oldchina
22nd Sep 2016, 19:18
Pace:
RETIRE? I love the word and recommend it. The best thing I ever did. No need to suck up to anybody.
"Taking on new challenges"? Comes straight from a book "what to say when you've been fired".
Some folks are in permanent denial. If you're 60 you're three quarters of the way there.
No you're not 30. Accept your age. And enjoy it while it lasts.

ExXB
22nd Sep 2016, 19:23
I love it when the immigration officer looks at my landing card, then at me and says ... really? Yes really, retired at 55 and look younger every day ...

Pontius Navigator
22nd Sep 2016, 19:36
I liked it when retirement approached:

"Just the job for you, Good for your career"

Get stuffed

"You're on nights next week"

Get stuffed

Mind you that was 17 years ago. I then worked another 10, now I do a few days a year.

pineridge
22nd Sep 2016, 19:44
I love being retired and am not in the least upset that I am looked upon as
a has been.
I boarded a bus in Burbank soon after I received my pensioner`s card and rode all the way to downtown Los Angeles for 25cents; also I can travel on the trains in Norway for less than the student fare- Whoopee!

rotornut
22nd Sep 2016, 19:52
My father retired from his government job at 65. He went on to start a law practice and worked full time for nearly 15 years. He then went part time and only stopped after suffering a number of strokes. He loved practicing law. He
never "retired".

Dan Gerous
22nd Sep 2016, 19:58
Never liked the dictionary. The plot was terrible, although everything was explained.

ian16th
22nd Sep 2016, 20:50
I like my standard answer to the 'what do you do with your time all day?'

Whatever I damned well want to!

radeng
22nd Sep 2016, 21:00
retire - means every other bu**er for miles seems to think you have lots of time to do things for them, especially when there's no pay involved!

Hydromet
22nd Sep 2016, 21:51
My 'retirement' 12 years ago at 57 was planned, and was the best career move I ever made. I now work full time at what was my hobby. I can take time off whenever I wish, I only take on projects that I like and I'm not competing for promotions or putting up with incompetent bosses.
My neighbour did a similar thing at a similar age, 10 years earlier than me, but is now starting to slow down. Pity, he's only 80.

tartare
22nd Sep 2016, 23:10
Just turned 50 and would retire tomorrow if I could.
Sick of watching asinine decisions being made, micro-management, and dealing with fools or narcissists.
So many more important things in the world than work.

John Hill
22nd Sep 2016, 23:18
Never did a day of hard work in my entire life until I retired.....

ZFT
22nd Sep 2016, 23:22
I'm still having to much fun to 'retire' but when the fun stops, I will just walk away and find other equally fun things to do. The nice thing now, everyone knows that, so no crap!

ArthurR
23rd Sep 2016, 08:24
I remember the first morning of my retirement, I got up at my normal time to go to work, then thought, what am I going to do?

handsfree
23rd Sep 2016, 09:19
I remember the first morning of my retirement, I got up at my normal time to go to work, walked to the end of the road, looked out over the valley and realised what it was like to be free at last.
The same sort of elated feeling as after you've just completed your first solo.

andytug
23rd Sep 2016, 09:30
Not old enough to retire yet (unfortunately) but know a lot of people who have, and the ones who find other interests/voluntary work etc to fill their time seem to have a much longer and happier retirement than those who don't. I reckon a happy retiree is one who tells you they have no idea how they ever found time to work.......

Hydromet
23rd Sep 2016, 09:32
I remember the first morning of my retirement, I got up at my normal time to go to work, and thought "This getting up early is so much more fun when you don't have to."

Expatrick
23rd Sep 2016, 09:41
I remember the first morning of my retirement, getting up at silly o clock to catch a plane to my new home city.
What really bugged me was all the people (including my own Mother) who said "get another job, you will be bored" - fat chance!

Kelly Hopper
23rd Sep 2016, 11:36
One year into a VERY early retirement and I'm the most content I've ever been. I love the feeling of not "having" to do anything. Lazy by nature it is bliss to just while away the day at home after a career spent away from home.
All those awful people I had to work with for years, still chasing the better job, better money? Not for me now. I got offered a flying job last week and seriously considered it as we are all eager to be airbourne but then reality set in and I just thought "what for?" To earn money I would probably never get to spend? To have my life hijacked yet again?
Nope. Retirement has been the best thing I ever did with my career......so far!

pulse1
23rd Sep 2016, 11:42
Most positive thing I noticed after I retired was that all those jobs which had to be crammed into valuable weekends could now be done when it suited me. If I got bored or tired cutting hedges or painting walls I could stop and carry on the next day, or even the one after that.

Peter-RB
23rd Sep 2016, 13:18
I retired when I was 52...but realised it was a mistake to do that after three months I went back to my works and surprised all of em who thought there lives would be easier..that was quite funny to see the look on faces when they realised "He's Back"

But its still good to explain you are retired when in some really blue nosed parties for one or another thing..you can just wander away whilst some self important Prat is talking absolute shite... no one dare's to say anything to you.. Eh:ok:

Pace
23rd Sep 2016, 14:33
Normally retirement was something you did after a lifetime of working 9 to 5 Monday to Friday at 65 you were considered old.
Many dropped dead soon after and we all knew the coach trips with blue haired old ladies who all outlived their poor husbands and spent their time alone running around garden centres

Retirement or RETIRE harps back to that age and reflects the fact that you are old, useless and put out to grass awaiting God

Things have changed! With medical advancements men are now living longer, looking after their appearance more mainly because the old thing of being with one partner for life has gone

Multiple partners means you are on the market more rather than going to seed. Then the most you would Pull would be the armchair in front of the Telly

Nowadays older people take up new business ideas which interest them
More holidays even extreme sports
It was refreshing to see a couple of years back that the Base jump world champion was 62 years old beating his 25 30 year old rivals

Government want us to work longer and older peoples contributions are much more appreciated whether in paid or voluntary work

RETIRE for me is a bygone era word which I don't like and feel we should have another word which more reflects modern life! Age is just a number just look at Joanna Lumley at over 70

I know one older couple who got bored after so called RETIRING they bought a boat and spend 9 months every year sailing around the world and working as they go a real adventure
You must watch a comedy Dirty Grandpa apart from being hilarious it has a strong message about how you approach your later life! RETIRE ? :yuk:

sailor
23rd Sep 2016, 16:28
In my group of retired friends we try not to use the word " work "; it is an unseemly rude and four-letter word to be avoided in polite company !

pax britanica
23rd Sep 2016, 17:10
I retired , sort of at 58 and at 66 I am still retired sort of. I have worked on and off since the first date but mostly on my terms and my schedule. occasionally i miss the maore social side of work but suspect theres not much of that left. And the best thing is not to be involved with a generation of useless avaricious management types who know nothing and contribute less to whatever company they are ruining this week..

So while it can have a few downsides retiring is good -less stress and more relaxation and time to take a balanced look at life and not getting phoned up when on holiday.

Pace
23rd Sep 2016, 17:23
So while it can have a few downsides retiring is good -less stress and more relaxation and time to take a balanced look at life and not getting phoned up when on holiday.

Great )) But can't we think up a new term instead of RETIRE ))

What about MOT doing MY OWN THING or something else but RETIRE sounds like tired or something worn out on the car that you need four of ))

Seldomfitforpurpose
23rd Sep 2016, 17:31
Left the RAF at 55 and retired, Mrs SFFP took early redundancy and her couple of pension early and neither of us miss work in any shape or form.

We spend our days either travelling in our motorhome, going on holiday with friends, looking after the grandkids or just doing stuff round the house and garden.

We both 'pinch ourselves' regularly at our luck but retirement suits the pair of us and returning to work is certainly not on any agenda here.

VP959
23rd Sep 2016, 18:01
I retired , sort of at 58 and at 66 I am still retired sort of. I have worked on and off since the first date but mostly on my terms and my schedule. occasionally i miss the maore social side of work but suspect theres not much of that left. And the best thing is not to be involved with a generation of useless avaricious management types who know nothing and contribute less to whatever company they are ruining this week..

So while it can have a few downsides retiring is good -less stress and more relaxation and time to take a balanced look at life and not getting phoned up when on holiday.

That pretty much sums up my feelings and experience. I too "retired" at 58, but 6 years later I continue to do the odd consulting job, on my own terms. I'm fortunate in that I don't really need the money, but I do miss the social side of work, so doing the odd short contract fills that need.

I very much like the freedom of no longer being "managed" by incompetents, and all the stress that resulted from childish senior management personality clashes. My major regret, when I was working, was allowing myself to get sucked into the "climb the greasy pole" brigade. It made the last 15 years of my working life pretty intolerable, having to work with people who had little or no interest in actually doing a proper job, but were focussed on seeing who they could shaft in order to climb up to the next rung in the management hierarchy.

My main problem is finding the time to take on even short contracts, as it seems that I have little free time now. I turn down far more jobs than I accept, and I suspect that, sooner or later, this will mean I get put on some sort of blacklist. I can't say it would really worry me too much, though!

SARF
23rd Sep 2016, 18:51
I retired at 45. Though I had been in the same game for nearly 30 years..
Lucky enough to afford it.. everyone said you will get bored.
Been four years now, if you can't find something to keep you amused and busy outside of work your not trying hard enough .. there is so much to do, though I will admit the transition can be tough for some, as it's usually so sudden..
Biggest problem with going early is all your mates are at work when your trying to arrange some fun

Fareastdriver
23rd Sep 2016, 20:04
I officially retired from my offshore helicopter company when I was 58. I was working in China at the time and they were short of jockeys. I then carried on as a contract pilot for a year in both China and Australia and then I was recruited by the host Chinese company. That lasted until I was sixty and past the ICAO age for international flying so I retired again.

After three months in the UK I got bored and phoned up the company to see if they were short. They were and grabbed me with both hands. I was now working to my own schedule for loads of dosh, taxable, unfortunately. After eighteen months a new chief pilot decided that as I was pulling in more akkers than he was my efforts were terminated so I retired again.

Eighteen months later I went back to China on a social visit and it appeared than the Chinese would allow Brits to fly to there licensing age, i.e. sixty five. As a result a week later I had my medical renewed and I was back on line. This lasted until I was sixty five because with a UK licence one cannot fly public transport over that age so I retired again.

During my last days some Oz pilots had suggested that I got an Oz licence as there isn't a 65 year bar. I thought about this and two months later I was in Perth doing my Australian licence. This was successful; the Chinese CAAC accepted the new age limit and I was back on the line in China.

The only really needed me for the Typhoon season but the Oz branch of my company were strapped for pilots, especially ex- military with winching and underslung so they asked me to go to the Solomon Islands. As a result I was rotating between China, the Solomons and Australia until the Chinese CAAC insisted that I get a Chinese national licence.

I was sixty six, knocking on sixty seven when I acquired my Chinese licence and I carried on until late 2008 when the market dried up for sixty eight year old offshore helicopter pilots.

I never actually worked for the whole of my working life. It was a hobby I got paid for.

I still go back there to see everybody.

oldchina
23rd Sep 2016, 20:21
Clearly there are some people who are very, very, easily bored.
I would hate to be with someone age 60 who behaves like he's 30.
Must be a pain in the buttocks for those who have to put up with it .

Kiltrash
23rd Sep 2016, 21:46
I worked 42years for the same employer, a MAJOR national company in UK and they paid me squillions when I took their kind offer of early retirement

So much to do now hobby wise I see EVEN kess of the wife that I ever did when working full time

Win win

Peter-RB
24th Sep 2016, 06:06
If you need to get rid of the word Retire... then possibly by reading this thread it could be

Re-Furbished Human RH, or Free At Last .FAL.. or refreshed Mind, RM ..recycled thought box..RTB....Clear Thinker at Last... CTL

Or just Bugger off I'm busy..!:D:D:D

Brian Abraham
24th Sep 2016, 06:46
Everything I did following school I never regarded as "work", enjoyed the lot, even the beginning steps leading to what I really wanted. Couldn't say the same for school. Leading up to retirement from "work" I always thought hanging up the boots would be akin to severing an arm or leg. Happily not the case, and never looked back.

Pace
24th Sep 2016, 07:01
The other points brought up in this thread concern two things

Many seem to be with a partner rather than alone and quite a few appear to have consultancy work or good levels of income ?

Retirement then can be a rich experience doing the things you want to do like travel or following hobbies

I wonder how many lack of income becomes a worry and curtails how rich your retirement is
How many spend their retirement alone either through choice, divorce/separation or bereavement

Considering the old 50s have become the new sixties etc and our life expectancy has extended that can put people not in work out of the income stream for a long time and sadly life revolves around money
If you have a gold plated pension scheme through past government work your laughing or if you have a business still ticking in the background etc your laughing and can have fun and of course the most important HEALTH

One of my best friends was an elderly pilot who had an absolute passion for flying, always so enthusiastic, saw life as an adventure. The last years of his life he ferried single engine little planes from the USA to Europe alone
He was 78 when he crashed and died in Canada because of bad Icing! Was he retired ? When I cautioned him on these foolhardy trips and warned him that he would kill himself he laughed it off with the reply that if that happened so be it

Peter-RB
24th Sep 2016, 07:33
Pace , your old Pilot pal had a good attitude...but a sad way to go!

hiflymk3
24th Sep 2016, 07:38
But I thought Jet Blast is a retirement home.

Pace
24th Sep 2016, 07:51
Pace , your old Pilot pal had a good attitude...but a sad way to go!

On the flip side I met a manager I hadn't seen for 25 years "what are you doing with yourself" I asked he was then also 78
" I watch the TV then I walk the dog then watch the TV then go to the doctor, then walk the dog etc "
Two guys the same age one who lived life to the full the other RETIRED ((
The other must be 87 now as he is still going
Shucks maybe us pilot guys refuse to grow up ))

Fareastdriver
24th Sep 2016, 10:17
Retirement then can be a rich experience doing the things you want to do like travel or following hobbies

That's what I did and I got paid for it.

Pace
24th Sep 2016, 11:34
That's what I did and I got paid for it.

Same here ) I think its hard for us to put down roots )

Krystal n chips
16th Jan 2017, 16:34
As a topic, one that is about to have a distinct relevance for me.

However, others, as we know, are long retired.

Thankfully, the Guardian, and next week in particular, offers one soul a chance to expand on how fortunate he is with regard to retirement and retirement income......to a far wider audience.

Being, as you allude, "successful", your contribution to the project would, I am sure, be welcomed.

I've already signed up of course...

https://www.theguardian.com/membership/2017/jan/16/the-new-retirement-how-an-ageing-population-is-transforming-britain

Gertrude the Wombat
16th Jan 2017, 19:28
I told my mother I was looking for a new job.


"That's very sad that you should have to do that, at your age I was retiring."


I explained that the two were actually linked.

Simplythebeast
16th Jan 2017, 20:02
Retired on my 50th birthday. Wonderful. Had a few weeks off then started exactly the same job at the same pay level with another organisation so full pay and full pension! After eight years I retired again, this time for good at 58 with two pensions.
Only thing I do now is voluntary work as a case worker for RAFA.

sidevalve
16th Jan 2017, 21:41
After the RAF, I spent the final 8 years (prior to retiring at 60) working for a large organisation that was undergoing structural convulsions (public=>private) and having to account for my time to various projects every week was a nause. The real pain was dealing with a newly formed IPT. Fortunately, I managed to pick up some consultancy work in Scandinavia that turned out to be v rewarding in terms of job satisfaction. (Dealing with adults helped too! :ok:)
Retirement is every bit as good as I'd hoped it might be. Being answerable to no-one (apart from my wife) is a great luxury and I've yet to experience a single day that has me wondering "What to do today?". It's a million miles from being the negative experience that some view it as.

Jet II
16th Jan 2017, 23:16
retire - means every other bu**er for miles seems to think you have lots of time to do things for them, especially when there's no pay involved!

Yes, I've found that as well, seem to be busier now than when I was working.

I stopped at 55 and would recommend it to anyone - just don't tell anyone ;)

Anilv
17th Jan 2017, 04:53
retirement : When you wake up, you don't know what you're going to do for the rest of the day. At bedtime, you still haven't finished.

UniFoxOs
17th Jan 2017, 06:33
I use the Spanish word for retired - seems much more appropriate to me. "Jubilado"

timgill
17th Jan 2017, 07:19
I'm not retired, but I have a question: before the internet, what did people do in their spare time? I think many retired folk spend a lot of their time on forums such as this one. For example, some contributors to this particular thread have posted thousands of times on Pprune.

The one I like is the really, really boring... thread, which is basically a group of people talking about the weather and what they're going to have for lunch. Nothing wrong with that, and it sometimes makes for riveting reading.

ExSp33db1rd
17th Jan 2017, 07:40
I wish I had a job, at least I'd get one day off a week !

Hydromet
17th Jan 2017, 08:19
One thing I have noticed since I retired is that it's much easier to get up early when you don't have to.

Fareastdriver
17th Jan 2017, 09:46
It doesn't matter what time You get up. It's still earlier than I do.

UniFoxOs
17th Jan 2017, 16:04
Get up when you like - as long as it's BEFORE you go to the toilet.

G-CPTN
17th Jan 2017, 16:32
Get up when you like - as long as it's BEFORE you go to the toilet.
That's the problem.

Gertrude the Wombat
17th Jan 2017, 19:14
I'm not retired, but I have a question: before the internet, what did people do in their spare time?
There was this thing called the "telly", I believe.

reynoldsno1
18th Jan 2017, 02:02
before the internet, what did people do in their spare time?
Same as I do now - reading, writing, painting/sketching, garden, hiking, improving my abysmal guitar playing. Only difference is now I don't have to go to the library so often with the interwebby thingy, and I get the chance to tinker with my homebuilt PC.... I retire in a few months - the CEO has only just realised and asked me what I was going to 'do'. I said 'lots', and he replied he couldn't imagine retiring. I asked him if he had any interests outside work. 'Not really', he said. "That's a shame", I replied ... I have found that the management types tend to live to work, rather than the other way round.

Hydromet
18th Jan 2017, 06:37
Same as I do now - reading, writing, painting/sketching, garden, hiking, improving my abysmal guitar playing. Only difference is now I don't have to go to the library so often with the interwebby thingy, and I get the chance to tinker with my homebuilt PC.... I retire in a few months
So what are you going to do in your spare time?:ok: