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View Full Version : Two removed for WRITING on the aircraft body!


zonoma
21st Sep 2016, 17:40
BBC News link here (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hampshire-37427052)
Basically two women boarded a FlyBe at Southampton and were writing on things with marker pens including the aircraft itself. Captain saw them and removed them from the flight.

G-CPTN
21st Sep 2016, 17:46
Apparently, they were part of a wedding party.

Shame!

foxmoth
21st Sep 2016, 18:06
Serves them right - things like this can actually be corrosive on aircraft surfaces!

Landflap
21st Sep 2016, 18:21
Yes. Cultured people refer to this as vandalism. Show these lowlifes the boundaries and we might progress in society. Good Captain qualities !

5150
21st Sep 2016, 18:26
That would put a lot of baggage handlers out of work !

750XL
21st Sep 2016, 18:27
Isn't uncommon to see graffiti (mainly stickers) around the door area of aircraft that use steps

Piltdown Man
21st Sep 2016, 18:38
I hope they are also presented with a bill for the removal of their graffiti. If normal aviation pricing is used, this will be an eye-wateringly large amount of money. It will also send an even bigger message to other would be miscreants who believe that it is OK to write on other people's property.

PM

NutLoose
21st Sep 2016, 19:02
Isn't uncommon to see graffiti (mainly stickers) around the door area of aircraft that use steps

Err... they are security seals, to show no one has entered the aircraft when parked up.

Capn Bloggs
22nd Sep 2016, 00:34
Err... they are security seals, to show no one has entered the aircraft when parked up.
Does that include the big round blue one that says "One World"? :)

onetrack
22nd Sep 2016, 04:49
Bit of a pity the same treatment isn't handed out to those low-life bus passengers who scratch up windows and scrawl their graffiti all through buses. If it was in my power, they'd be walking everywhere.

parabellum
22nd Sep 2016, 08:21
It isn't only passengers that commit acts of vandalism. In April this year I travelled from Melbourne to Singapore on Scoot. Arrived for check in a bit early and flight delayed. My bag was in the airlines custody, (or their agents), for about three hours.


When I got to my hotel in Singapore I could not open my bag, a new, lightweight, ultra strong Samsonite with a combination lock that secured two zips. Tried everything, as did the hotel engineer. As luck would have it the Samsonite service office was only about 75 yards from the hotel and I took my case there in the morning, the young lady tried all her tricks, to no avail and said, after examining lock with a flash light, that it looked as though it had been super-glued around the button that should slide sideways and release the zips. The repair facility agreed and changed the lock, FOC. Sure enough, the lock had been deliberately super-glued shut. Reports filed to police at Melbourne and to Scoot, "no further action" I was told by the police! Scoot told me their baggage claim office was in Sydney!


What kind of person is it that goes to work deliberately armed with super-glue so that they can vandalise passengers baggage?

ImageGear
22nd Sep 2016, 08:23
It's a world-wide problem.

Don't even talk to me about London Underground Tubes, mind you Paris out-graffiti's all of them.

Off course we have had our own "intelligent" community of troops who did it to Lightnings on the line.

Imagegear

hiflymk3
22nd Sep 2016, 08:35
The writing's on the wall.

Hydromet
22nd Sep 2016, 08:53
But it's their right, innit. (No pun intended)

Pontius Navigator
22nd Sep 2016, 08:54
Try Athens; get shares in spray paint companies.

ZOOKER
22nd Sep 2016, 08:58
ImageGear, you are not wrong.

We visited 'The City Of Light' last week, for the first time in 20 years. The amount of 'coloured fat-writing' was astonishing, as were some of the surfaces it appeared on, especially from the accessibility standpoint.

Enos
22nd Sep 2016, 09:00
People who graffiti remind me of dogs pissing on power poles, ie I was here!! And I'm not really that advanced.

That or when they started scribbling on the walls at the age of three their chav parents never told them not to.

oblivia
22nd Sep 2016, 10:22
To be fair, the desire to mark our presence on walls seems to have been around since before we started building walls, never mind flying machines. On the other hand, looking down our noses at others is probably an even older trait...

Enos
22nd Sep 2016, 11:09
To be fair, the desire to mark our presence on walls seems to have been around since before we started building walls, never mind flying machines. On the other hand, looking down our noses at others is probably an even older trait...

True that people would mark the walls of cave many many years ago, but as a race we've advanced since that time.

Looking down our nose at people, I would have to yes I do look down my nose at people who get on an aircraft and start to draw or write on it, or any other mode of transport shared by others, if they want to do it on anything they own, good for them

Good on the captain for kicking them off.

cattletruck
22nd Sep 2016, 12:17
Please send them the bill.

According to a reformed graffiti artist who told his story in a local rag the need to deface someone else's property comes out of a need of self expression.

The so called artist went on to say that it is considered bad practice to spray over the top of someone else's "self expression".

So the solution it seems is to just simply write over the top of their "self expression" work the following: "Is a d!ckhead".

Avitor
22nd Sep 2016, 12:25
They were a step ahead of Kilroy.

750XL
22nd Sep 2016, 15:25
Err... they are security seals, to show no one has entered the aircraft when parked up.

Errr, no they're not.

I've seen hundreds (dare I say thousands) of stickers on aircraft, that aren't security seals. The type often plastered everywhere by football fans when visiting away games.

Infact, I'm not aware of any airlines that actually use security seals anymore. It isn't common practice at my station since the rules changed about 5 years ago.

Krystal n chips
22nd Sep 2016, 17:54
Stripping down the last Nimrod which was, but duly wasn't, to be converted to the "all singing and dancing" version, at the rear of the aircraft we came across some "thoughtful maths".....kindly written, in pencil please note, on the skin was not one, but three summations, all different in style, where somebody had calculated their hours / overtime payments. ...judging from the figures, these calculations had, erm, "been there for some considerable time ".....cough !

Mechta
22nd Sep 2016, 19:55
Looking down our nose at people, I would have to yes I do look down my nose at people who get on an aircraft and start to draw or write on it, or any other mode of transport shared by others, if they want to do it on anything they own, good for them


http://www.eacott.com.au/gallery/d/1426-2/RAF+Whirlwind+Fly+Navy.jpg

http://www.eacott.com.au/gallery/d/1426-2/RAF+Whirlwind+Fly+Navy.jpg

The perpetrators were presumably taxpayers, so they probably considered that they did own it.

Hydromet
22nd Sep 2016, 22:55
50 years ago, it wasn't unusual to find graffiti under the hub on the RH control column of 707s. Things along the lines of "Bloggs for the old mens' home" or worse were common.

parabellum
23rd Sep 2016, 05:35
And under the centre of the LH control column would often be: "Havana App. 126.7" - True, was on a BMA 707 that I saw, whilst visiting the flight deck, but I am told it was widespread at that particular time. (126.7 is just an example!).

chevvron
23rd Sep 2016, 05:45
Stripping down the last Nimrod which was, but duly wasn't, to be converted to the "all singing and dancing" version, at the rear of the aircraft we came across some "thoughtful maths".....kindly written, in pencil please note, on the skin was not one, but three summations, all different in style, where somebody had calculated their hours / overtime payments. ...judging from the figures, these calculations had, erm, "been there for some considerable time ".....cough !
That's dangerous; the graphite could react with the alloy as it did in a light aircraft years ago.
Inspector doing permit renewal drew a ring (in pencil) around a dent on the wing; the circle corroded and eventually fell out!

sitigeltfel
23rd Sep 2016, 05:58
Did they use "Pilot" brand pens?

ExSp33db1rd
23rd Sep 2016, 06:35
........under the hub on the RH control column of 707s.

After a particularly busy summer schedule I once found a ( unused ! ) condom tucked under the control column centre 707 logo disc - which was easily removable - along with a note that said " no longer required, they've taken the stand out of standoff "

A PanAm skipper once expressed surprise that all our 707's still had the 707 logo remaining in the centre of the control columns, he reckoned that all the PanAm ones had been nicked within a few weeks of delivery, and were being used as paperweights in various "dens" around the crew homes.

I flew a 707 into Philadelphia shortly before it was delivered to Boeing in part exchange for a 747, and Boeing than donated it to the Benjamin Franklin (right name ?) Museum in Philly, and shortly afterwards I visited Philly and visited the museum and climbed into our old 707. I was amused to see that the two 707 logos were now missing from the control columns. Maybe our two pilots nicked them on the delivery flight, assuming that the aircraft was to be cocooned, or scrapped ? Wouldn't mind having one now, should have nicked one myself !

Groundgripper
23rd Sep 2016, 13:04
The professionals don't always get it exactly right, either. Someone thought it a good idea to have the slogan 'Longer - Larger - Farther' on the side of their A340 at Farnborough in, I think, 1998. They obviously didn't realise what would happen when the rear starboard service door was opened.

http://i925.photobucket.com/albums/ad98/cb1943/362155a1-7d25-450e-bc3d-c6c4237548c8_zps9295acb1.jpg (http://s925.photobucket.com/user/cb1943/media/362155a1-7d25-450e-bc3d-c6c4237548c8_zps9295acb1.jpg.html)

:E:E

GG