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ex_matelot
16th Sep 2016, 19:21
Where do I stand with regards to billing a council for services not rendered - namely- missed bin collection and then failure to collect once complained about?

I'm going to have to get a van to do a tip run. Does council tax not cover this?

In monetary terms it will not cost me much but in pain in the arse and having to stack rubbish out the back then yes it is.

Ta.

Daysleeper
16th Sep 2016, 19:38
You have a tip that will take household waste rather than just recyclables? You might want to check that before just turning up with it. Round here: no vans, no trailers, no "waste" such as food packaging, no black bin sacks (have to be opened).

G-CPTN
16th Sep 2016, 19:39
Most (well, some) councils will collect if requested if you can explain that the 'miss' was their fault rather than you putting out the bin late or in the wrong location.

Billing Council (http://www.billingparish.co.uk).

racedo
16th Sep 2016, 19:40
Bring waste to council offices with a local Journo and Photographer complaining of no services.

Make sure its smelly as they will react quickly.

ex_matelot
16th Sep 2016, 19:45
It was their mistake. I phoned yesterday and was told It would be collected today. At 13:00 today I phoned again asking when it would be. I was told the lady I spoke to previously was mistaken and they only do recollections if a whole street is missed.
I asked for an address to forward on the bill should I have to arrange a tip run. He stated he did not know as in 15 years he had never been asked that..I was put on hold again.

Was told he'd been on to the depot at Highbridge and it's being jobbed for tomorrow but..I think I may have been fobbed off..it is a weekend afterall.

VP959
16th Sep 2016, 20:33
It's happened to me a few times; we live on a road junction that is the crossing point for two different collection runs, so crews unfamiliar with the route may well either try and collect our bins twice or not at all.

Every time it happens I call and complain, and, so far, every time I've done this they have made a special collection the following day, without fail.

TBH, I'm fed up with having to call them when this happens, but they do always send a truck out specially the next day, so my only real complaint is that it probably adds a fair bit to the Council Tax bill, that could be avoided if the crews were instructed about the problem.

I'm not sure that you can bill the council without having first having taken them to court for failure to provide the service and winning the case for compensation for your costs.

fa2fi
16th Sep 2016, 20:42
Happened to me a few times due to the way our carparking works. A quick email usually gets it collected the very next day.

ShyTorque
16th Sep 2016, 21:08
I'm going to have to get a van to do a tip run. Does council tax not cover this?

Our local council now require registration of vehicles to drive to the "recycling" centre. As from this month, you can't drive an unregistered vehicle onto the site. They claim to have ANPR cameras to keep tabs on this. Vans aren't allowed.

No doubt they will soon be complaining of an increase in "fly tipping". The latter is bad enough already.

G-CPTN
16th Sep 2016, 21:42
Not only are vans (and trailers) prohibited (except with a special household permit), but DIY 'rubble' is charged from 2 per bag, 12 per car (estate cars 20) up to 80 for a Transit-sized van - this includes gravel, soil, glass, plasterboard, toilets etc - but not exceeding 6 cu yds per private household per year (tradesmen excepted - they cannot access the disposal service).

VP959
17th Sep 2016, 07:36
Our local council now require registration of vehicles to drive to the "recycling" centre. As from this month, you can't drive an unregistered vehicle onto the site. They claim to have ANPR cameras to keep tabs on this. Vans aren't allowed.

No doubt they will soon be complaining of an increase in "fly tipping". The latter is bad enough already.
Ours does pretty much the same, but just using ANPR to ban vehicles they think may be tradesmen. I'm banned from our local recycling place, because when I fitted a new bathroom and kitchen I took all the old stuff over there in four or five trips. On the last trip they stopped me and told me I was banned for trying to dump "trade waste". I explained that I was just doing DIY, but the guy was adamant. When I changed cars I found I was still banned, which is how I found out it uses ANPR (both cars had the same plates).

In my case I live right on the border of another county, so it's only an extra couple of miles to drive to one of their recycling centres, but my guess is that the massively increased level of fly tipping that's been going on around here over the past couple of years is directly linked to the banning of people from recycling centres.

This all happened after they privatised the recycling and waste collection service, so my guess is that the recycling company are just trying to maximise their profit and don't care at all about the fly tipping problem, as that then becomes a council problem. It may even be that the recycling and waste company earn more money from clearing up fly tipping, so have no incentive at all to allow people to make better use of the recycling centres.

andytug
17th Sep 2016, 08:16
It's a joke, I tried to dump a concrete fence post at our local tip, approx 3ft long. "You need a permit". I told them to forget it. As you say no wonder fly tipping on the rise, which costs more to clean up than keeping the service the way it was, surely?

ShyTorque
17th Sep 2016, 09:49
Hang on a mo'. What do we know about a subject as 'complicated' as this?

The councils employ the services of highly expensive consultants to come up with these new money saving ideas.

At our expense, obviously....

Trouble is, some of them appear to be about six years old.

VP959
17th Sep 2016, 10:09
The really big problem with our council is that it is totally fragmented, so although they are (quite understandably) trying to save a lot of money, they are doing it in wholly unconnected "initiatives", which end up costing them more money overall.

The increase in fly tipping, as a consequence of restricting access to recycling centres, and the subsequent increase in cost of removing it, is just one issue. In that case, the department responsible for running waste collection and recycling doesn't care about the impact on the highways budget from fly tipping (and, from what I can see, it's highways who seem to carry the can for fly tipping clearance).

Another example. To save money, they tried to resurface our road (which was in a very bad condition) using a quick and cheap "wet slurry" system. It broke up in big sections within 24 hours of being laid, making the road so dangerous they had to close it. They then planed the road off and relaid the same slurry system. Surprise, surprise, that also failed, but it did last around 3 months. A blind man could see that many of the potholes had gone through the road sub-base, so laying an inch of wet slurry wasn't going to fix the problem.

Six months after they started the fiasco, they bit the bullet, planed the road off again, filled and compacted all the areas of damaged sub-base and laid a new tarmacadam surface, since when the road has been fine. I hate to think how much money was wasted with their initial "money saving" repair methods.

Expatrick
17th Sep 2016, 10:10
Why does poor old Britain find it so difficult to collect the rubbish? Here (Budapest) we have 3 general waste collections weekly (even on Christmas Day), recycling bins emptied weekly, garden waste removed weekly, Christmas trees removed as soon as they are thrown out AND annual throw out day when anything (old beds, TVs, kitchen units, carpets) is chucked onto the pavement and removed the following morning!

Allan Lupton
17th Sep 2016, 11:23
Another example. To save money, they tried to resurface our road (which was in a very bad condition) using a quick and cheap "wet slurry" system. It broke up in big sections within 24 hours of being laid, making the road so dangerous they had to close it. They then planed the road off and relaid the same slurry system. Surprise, surprise, that also failed, but it did last around 3 months. A blind man could see that many of the potholes had gone through the road sub-base, so laying an inch of wet slurry wasn't going to fix the problem.

Six months after they started the fiasco, they bit the bullet, planed the road off again, filled and compacted all the areas of damaged sub-base and laid a new tarmacadam surface, since when the road has been fine. I hate to think how much money was wasted with their initial "money saving" repair methods.
As I have put it to Hertfordshire CC under similar circumstances, " . . why is there never enough money to do a job properly when there is always enough to do it twice?"

Kelly Hopper
17th Sep 2016, 12:14
Uk is a sick country! You are paying 4 times in local taxes than I pay! My rubbish gets collected every monday at 8am on the dot. My local council have just built a new waste disposal centre. It is excellent. All organised with even toilets. The only problem I ever had was 3 trips in one day and they stopped me and asked. When I explained that it all would not go in one load they were fine. Why is EVERYTHING in UK such a problem? As a citizen you are the enemy of the state!

ShyTorque
17th Sep 2016, 23:22
In UK we council tax payers are mainly here to pay council pensions.

I will be unable to match the pension of the husband of my wife's good friend by a long chalk. He worked for the local council for almost, but not quite as long as I worked for the military and the private sector. He was able to take an early retirement and his retirement present to himself was to go to the Mercedes Benz factory in Germany and watch his new luxury car with all the extras being made. Very nice.

My retirement car (about five years hence) is likely to be the one I have now. It's already sixteen years old and is worth about 300 according to the insurance company. At least it won't depreciate much.

Fairdealfrank
18th Sep 2016, 00:54
Billing local council
Contact your councillor for help. Once you get the runaround from him/her, contact your MP for help. Parliament makes the stupid laws and/or over-zealously implements ludicrous EU "directives" that councils have to abide by, and yes it's true that councils can be over-zealous in implementing them.

BTW which council did you say it was?


Why is EVERYTHING in UK such a problem? As a citizen you are the enemy of the state! Because they've all read "1984" and think it's a "how to" manual/template rather than the warning against totalitarianism that George Orwell intended it to be.



In UK we council tax payers are mainly here to pay council pensions.And the over-inflated salaries of layers and layers of mostly useless managers, just like in the NHS.

Nervous SLF
18th Sep 2016, 05:18
Rotorua (NZ) Council had a large re-cycle plant in the center of town which took almost everything except window glass and lightbulbs.
It has been removed from Council control and is now run by a private company who will no longer accept polystyrene, laptop batteries,
plastic bags and also will charge for any and all electrical equipment to be recycled.
Plastic bags will be put out with general household rubbish as part of the rubbish collection scheme starting next month. Rotorua Lakes
Council said in a statement yesterday "plastic bags and other soft plastics, such as cling film and ziplock bags, would need to be put with
general landfill waste" Those types of plastics are no longer accepted at the council's inner-city recycling centre because "The system used
by council's new waste collection provider, Smart Environmental, cannot process plastic bags as they disrupt and damage the company's
recycling sorting machinery."

Funny how by reducing the amount of stuff that can be recycled and insisting that what was recycled in the past now has to go into general
rubbish the Council can state that the new scheme will dramatically increase recycling and reduce waste going to landfill,"

As for fridges, computers, tv's, clothes dryers etc now being charged for I can only predict fly-tipping will increase very fast.

treadigraph
18th Sep 2016, 10:34
The one great advantage of living in a suburban area is the rise of the Metal Fairies. Leave an unwanted metal object (fridge/washing machine/bath/electric heater/etc) outside and it will be magically gone within a few days, usually a few hours. My old tumble dryer, disappeared overnight, an exercise bike in less than an hour - the buggers made me sweat over the old bath, it was there for three nights and I was beginning to think I'd have to wheel-barrow it down to the recycling centre, 400yds away!

Somebody even wheeled away the knackered and horrible old three-piece suite I once left for the council to collect - sans cushions! Not much metal in it...

westernhero
18th Sep 2016, 17:38
??? Local Midlands council tip takes everything you want to take to it although it's a bit of a faff walking around the various skips for everything, no complaints. The Holiday home in Northumberland likewise has a similar tip which takes everything, mind the weekly bins recycles very little, basically only paper and some plastic/ cans, no glass of any description. All glass just gets thrown in the general rubbish bin. Is it just a Southern thing ?

VP959
18th Sep 2016, 17:52
Is it just a Southern thing ?

I'm not sure. Our local recycling place used to be great, the guys there were friendly and helpful and they even encouraged a bit of re-use of items that were dumped but still either in working order or had useful salvageable parts. I salvaged a very tough four wheel trolley; the only thing wrong with it was a flat tyre. There were donation boxes for charities, so if you snagged something there was an expectation that you'd donate.

It all changed when the refuse and recycling service was privatised. The atmosphere became distinctly unwelcoming, the staff there are now just bloody rude and the stack of re-usable stuff (and the charity boxes) went. As I discovered a couple of years ago, they also introduced ANPR and started banning anyone who used the facility too regularly.

There's a strong correlation between the service being privatised and the change in attitude and policy, and I strongly suspect it's down to the way the contract has been let. There has to be an incentive for the recycling centre to minimise the number of people that use it, as that is what they are doing by the way they've changed how it's run.

The first immediate problem after privatisation was that they refused to accept old Christmas trees. Previously, they had set up a big shredder and produced a mountain of wood chips on site that were then used in the council-run parks and gardens. Now it's up to local communities to organise things like this. Our parish council hires in a big shredder and everyone mucks in to shred a few hundred Christmas trees on the first weekend after 12th night. They did this because the first Christmas after privatisation some scallywags saw an opportunity and went around with a pick-up, knocking on doors and offering to collect old trees for 50p a time. They then drove just out of the village and dumped them all in a lay-by............

yellowtriumph
18th Sep 2016, 18:14
VP959,


I used to use the 'dump' so often I used to josh with the chaps that ran it that they were on my Christmas card list. (I used to have a very large garden that generated a lot a waste year round).


They had the ANPR set up to monitor usage etc, and whenever I could I would park outside the dump and walk in with the rubbish bagged up. Obviously depends on your local dumps layout etc.

ShyTorque
18th Sep 2016, 19:09
It's also strictly prohibited to walk rubbish onto our local recycling centre. Another reason why fly tipping is becoming an increasing problem.

VP959
19th Sep 2016, 09:06
By pure coincidence, it looks as if a BBC investigative journalism programme, "Inside Out" has been looking at the big increase in fly-tipping: How do you stop fly-tipping and littering? - BBC News (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-37350153)

It'll be interesting to see if they connect the growing refusal of recycling centres to accept stuff with the increase in the incidence of fly-tipping.

Private jet
19th Sep 2016, 11:44
There is a notorious fly-tipping spot a couple of miles from here. One item that magically appears there regularly is old truck tyres. Haulage contractors retain the carcasses of worn tyres because they don't want to pay the recycling fees and then promptly take them out and dump them.( Either that or the new tyre fitters, who are charging for recycling and then dumping)
A few years ago, at the same spot an entire three piece suite appeared (very 1970's/George & Mildred style it was too). The next day an old TV. After the weekend a washing machine had turned up soon followed by an old freestanding cooker. The place looked ready for a homeless person to move straight into!

treadigraph
19th Sep 2016, 12:18
It's also strictly prohibited to walk rubbish onto our local recycling centre
I use a wheelbarrow down to our site. Turned up a few years ago with a barrow load of hard core (building waste not naughty pictures!) and was stopped by an officious "stand-by-your-rights" sort of a bloke and told that walking on the site was not allowed. "See that big bloke over there" I enquired. Oik: "Yeah, he's the guv'nor". Me: "Indeed he is and just half an hour ago he helped me unload the last lot of this crap into the skip. Shall we have a little chat with him, or would you like to stop the bullsh!t?" Never saw him again...

Given that councils have sustainability agendas, preventing locals from bringing their recycling on foot is remarkably stupid.

Had reason to use West Sussex's recycling centre near Horsham recently - what a brilliant set up it is, and very helpful staff too.

ShyTorque
19th Sep 2016, 12:38
Given that councils have sustainability agendas, preventing locals from bringing their recycling on foot is remarkably stupid.

Agreed, but I think it's because if you're not in a vehicle, you're not traceable.

I had a spat with my local "environmental" services dept. a while back, regarding the disposal of used engine oil. The centre didn't have any facilities for this. The operative told me to "just chuck it in with the rest of the unrecyclables" was the answer he gave. I took the oil home and rang the council who told me the centre definitely did have those facilities. No, they did not, later confirmed. It appeared that the private company who were supposed to be doing this, weren't. The council chap I had spoken to rang me back and told me to take it to another centre which he named. I pointed out that this centre was in a different county and came under a different council! He had no answer to that. Thankfully, the company involved eventually lost the contract and now we have a new centre with a proper oil disposal point.

Ancient Observer
20th Sep 2016, 14:08
I can't speak highly enough of the arrangements in South Bucks. They seem to have a place for everything. The only banned stuff is asbestos.
If they spot re-usable stuff of any sort, they identify it and send it to the charity "shop" by the dump in High Wycombe. That, Freecycle, and decent local charity shops keep me out of "real" shops.

westernhero
20th Sep 2016, 22:30
VP959
Our local tip is also privatised, takes everything as far as I can see. Only problem is the new site layout is a bit of a mare, when it's tail backed I just park outside and walk my stuff in, note no problem from the helpful staff. Our Council weekly collection also recycles all paper/tins/plastics all in one bin. All quite easy really. I do think it's all down to rubbish ( pun intended ) councils and the contracts that they manage to get themselves into that is the main problem.