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Loose rivets
13th Sep 2016, 21:57
I put my 635 on Gumtree. Love it but it was a daft purchase.

Tonight, I get a MSG that I can't reply to. How does that happen, or is it part of Gum's security stuff?

Anyway, I said via email that it was still for sale and this is the (gmail) reply I got. Does it remind you of anything?


On 13 September 2016 at 21:43, Sarah Wallace <[email protected]> wrote:

Great! please consider it sold and take the ads down off gumtree,i am buying it for my son and i am ready to pay your full asking price, i have read through the advert and i'm totally satisfied with it and i will be glad if you can get back to me fast,sadly i won't be able to come for the inspection and pick up due to my disabilities,i loss my hearing and being on a wheelchair but I have a courier agent that will help me to pick it up at your preferred location.
Regarding the payment i can only pay via PayPal at the moment and I will be responsible for all the PayPal fee/charges on this transaction kindly get back to me with your PayPal email and the pick up location so that i can inform the courier agent about it now?
Awaiting your reply soon...

Mmm . . . I'm not sure you realize how impossible it would be to do a deal in that way. While I'm willing to demonstrate the car, it doesn't get taken away until the money is in my bank and then transferred to a locked account.

On 13 September 2016 at 21:52, Sarah Wallace <[email protected]> wrote:

I'm sorry i am disabled and i have limited access to cash and other payment methods.
You can setup a PayPal account at www.paypal.com it's very safe and secure. Also it's very easy to set up within few minutes.


I think we both know PayPal does NOT secure car deals.

If you pay 1000 deposit, I'll hold the car for you for a week. Remember, it doesn't move until the money is LOCKED in MY bank.


'She's' nothing if not persistent -


Please what is the name associated with that PayPal details and email as i need to confirm before i make payment?
Just to clarify,how much should i send into your PayPal account?

G-CPTN
13th Sep 2016, 22:00
It stinks!

(not your Beemer)

G-CPTN
13th Sep 2016, 22:12
When I needed to sell my last car, I was worried that I might be scammed - even being paid in cash might be forged notes.

When the advert appeared (in the local weekly newspaper) I received a call from a local tradesman. His 'previous model' had just died and he urgently needed another estate car.
He turned up and I took him for a ride (me driving).
He declared himself satisfied with my car and the asking price.
He said would cash do? Could I take him to the bank (I had already asked them how I could detect forged notes - they told me about the marker pens, and even gave me one).
We went into the bank (my bank - and his) and he withdrew the cash and handed it to me and I paid it into my account straight away.
We returned to my house and signed the registration document and he left with the car - both satisfied.

I still see it driving through the village occasionally - it is like seeing an old girlfriend. :{

Loose rivets
13th Sep 2016, 22:58
When I bought the car, the sole trader dealer and I walked to his Barclays and told a nice lady teller that we needed to put my money into his account. She spent ages trying to get into my account. (I could have done it on the phone app from his house but I felt better about being in the bank.) She told me we'd have to come back tomorrow!

I 'mentioned' I'd been a customer for 50 years, and they have a (small) fortune of mine which they get almost free of charge. I also mentioned I spent the day getting there. A manager lady came over.

All was resolved, but it was bewildering to think Barclays could have done that. Reminded me of the NTNO'clock news sketch where they lost the cardboard box with Mel's or Rowan's money in it. (they suddenly burst out laughing, and said, of course we haven't' lost your box. Here it is! )

Funny things money transfers. I was in Big Motoring World. Totally amazing place. The car I was hot to own was a 640 Gran Coupe. It had cost 72,000 just over two years ago, and although I couldn't justify it, it would have been the best deal. I was loaned a small office and told the WiFi key. No matter how hard I tried, I couldn't get on their network. For some reason, I went off the boil and came back into Essex and bought mine. Shame really. The 740 was well over 300hp and mint. The only other time I've stretched the finances, I owned a 280ZX for a year and made about 50% on the purchase price. It's all about having the b$%2s to have a go. The faint-hearted have no place in business.

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tartare
14th Sep 2016, 00:32
Similar scam operates here in Oztrailia.
Had people approach with same line when I tried to sell our Volvo, and then again when I got rid of the Duke.
Made the guy who actually bought my bike come round with the asking price in envelope of cold hard cash. Photo of his licence - "sure you can take it for a test ride. Your money stays here on the kitchen table. Any damage comes out of this. Don't like it and you take your money away."
Unlike a guy in the papers here last week who was trying to sell his Panigale. Dude turns up, takes it for test ride. Car he arrived in waits outside. Owner of bike receives call "I've been pulled over by cops at petrol station for speeding, they want to speak to you." Heads off to petrol station. No dude, no bike. Comes back home. Car gone. Dude's mobile phone now switched off. $26,000 bike - gone.

Metro man
14th Sep 2016, 01:18
The story often involves an oil rig or fishing boat as well. They may use a hijacked PayPal account to overpay and request you send back the difference via Western Union.

Loose rivets
14th Sep 2016, 03:02
I must have a very honest voice. Folk used to pay in advance for my CAD workstations. Blimey, they'd be over a hundred grand now. :ooh: Anyway, a chap phones about my GSX 750R which Suzuki had given me delivered in a crate.

I'd sneaked a ride or two but the blips weren't worn off the tyres. Young chap listens to my story of my client's account and wires 3,600 quid into that. That was in the 80s. I delivered it in rain to Victoria station. It was so good that I'd have not sold it if I'd known. (I'd been bitten by the EFE1100 and after two years of fussing, Herron Suzuki sent the replacement.

onetrack
14th Sep 2016, 03:20
The scheming of the bottom-feeders is endless. Local young bloke wanted to sell his hot Holden Commodore.
Advertises it, and 4 blokes turn up. They want to take it for a test drive.
Young bloke climbs in, but all four hoods climb in as well.
They get quite a few kms away into an isolated area - the one hood pulls a big knife on the young fella, threatens to carve him up, then they throw him out of the car, and drive off.
$25,000 car gone, just like that. Always ensure you have the numbers to outnumber the "buyers".

Kelly Hopper
14th Sep 2016, 08:12
Loose. I had that exact same message sent to me in January this year also over a BMW. I couldn't quite see where the scam was as on what grounds could paypal reverse the transaction? Buying a secondhand car it's buyer beware.
Anyway she was so adament it had to be paypal I smelled a rat and politely said no.

caroline199
14th Sep 2016, 10:00
Had exactly same scam last night, but scared her off by replying to her email that I had heard she was also trying to by a BMW off Gumtree!:D

chuks
14th Sep 2016, 10:59
I was trying to sell a motorcycle once, using that old-fashioned advert in the paper, given that the internet did not exist back about 40 years ago.

I got a call from some black guy in downtown Washington, D.C., asking me to ride down to Southeast, the heart of the black slum then, so that he could inspect the bike. I told him that if he really was interested then he should come up to Rockville, Maryland, when he could inspect it as closely as he wanted to, but if he seriously expected me to ride down to his neighborhood, all on my own .... It was a nice try, I guess.

sitigeltfel
14th Sep 2016, 11:08
You can run checks on an email user using sites such as this (http://verify-email.org/).

You have to pay to get detailed info, but it may help to get some verification of who you are dealing with.

Loose rivets
14th Sep 2016, 13:15
An amazing site. I wish I needed it enough to pay the monthly fee. I did show some interesting facts, thanks.

Mike6567
14th Sep 2016, 13:34
Loose
On LBC they keep advertising webuyanycar.com. If you need a quick sale how much do you lose using this method?
(I assume the initial price offered is reduced when you get to do the deal)
I am usually lazy and do a P/X and have wondered if this is a better alternative.
Mike

Sorry chaps I have just looked at the site for the first time and my WOT incator goes orange so it is untrustworthy
I have answered my own question - maybe I shoud delete this post?

finncapt
14th Sep 2016, 15:14
Sitig.

I tried my own email in that and the result was bad.

What am I to infer from that - good job I don't want a BMW!!

Fitter2
14th Sep 2016, 15:56
webuyanycar.com will offer you a scrapyard price; if you laugh and ignore them subsequently you get daily e-mails gradually increasing the price.

These stop after a while, I assume at the point they can't be sure of offloading the make/model to a dealer.

UniFoxOs
14th Sep 2016, 16:03
I wish I needed it enough to pay the monthly fee

I thought it was free for low usage. According to that site my 20-year old Yahoo email address is "bad", whereas my newer address on my own domain is OK, as is the gmx.com one I am moving from Yahoo on to.

VP959
14th Sep 2016, 16:08
webuyanycar.com will offer you a scrapyard price; if you laugh and ignore them subsequently you get daily e-mails gradually increasing the price.

These stop after a while, I assume at the point they can't be sure of offloading the make/model to a dealer.

This tallies with what I've heard. Basically it's a "service" for idiots who have no idea of the market value of their car and can't be bothered to look it up.

As for their ad implying that you'll get a better deal against a trade in, then that's generally misleading in my view. If you're trading in a car that the dealer wants (i.e. if you're buying a new car of the same make and your trade-in is within the age, mileage and condition range that the dealer would sell directly) then the chances are you'll get a better price by trading in.

I once advertised a 3 year old Honda on AutoTrader, only because I'd been given a low trade-in price from a Merc dealer (who essentially didn't want the Honda). It was bought for the full asking price by an agent working for the local Honda main dealer the evening the magazine came out. I've no doubt that if I'd been buying a new Honda I'd have probably got a better price for it when trading in.

It's all about profit and cost, I believe. If the dealer reckons he can make a profit from selling your trade-in and a profit from selling you a new car, then there's a reasonable chance you'll get a good "price to change". It all hinges on you knowing how much both cars are really worth, though, plus knowing about some of the sales tricks dealers use. I once bought a new car (from the main dealer I have since bought two more cars from) for a fair price that was probably slightly lower than the dealer really wanted to sell for. He fell for the "handshake trick" and admitted to me afterwards that he'd never had a customer try it with him before, and reacted without thinking when I made an offer and put my hand out for him to shake it.

Above The Clouds
14th Sep 2016, 16:23
Be warned stay well away, again be warned stay well away.

What happens is she pays you via paypal, they get the car and then she complains to paypal that she didn't receive the goods.

Wait for it, paypal will then refund her the monies from your account and you have to prove otherwise.

I haven't been caught by this yet but got close when looking at purchasing a car from eBay. No way of contacting the owner eccept via email, they replied via sms saying a viewing was not possible for various reasons but could deliver the car to anywhere I wanted for inspection.

Alarm bells rang so I played them at their own game asking where the car was, then miraculously I only lived a few miles away ;) and could pop in anytime to view pay cash and drive away, a few emails later they realised and the conversation dried up.

The other give away was every car they had for sale was in a different part of the country

Once again be warned stay well away.

Nervous SLF
14th Sep 2016, 21:46
You can run checks on an email user using sites such as this (http://verify-email.org/).

You have to pay to get detailed info, but it may help to get some verification of who you are dealing with.

I have just checked my main e-mail address and 3 others including one used
only by SWMBO.
Only my main one was ok the others were "bad" :)

AtomKraft
15th Sep 2016, 16:26
I was selling a Tiger once. Bloke phoned up and said 'I'll buy it'.

I said, send me a deposit please, and at least come and look at it!

No, he said.

Next day cheque for the whole price arrived. I smelt a rat....

Cashed the cheque, and waited.....

Low loader arrived for the car and took it away.

Smelled another rat.

Guy was completely genuine.

olympus
15th Sep 2016, 17:27
webuyanycar.com will offer you a scrapyard price

Not true. I have posted this before but will repeat it here... WBAC .com is owned by British Car Auctions and is thus a conduit for the supply of stock to BCA's auctions. They will therefore offer a price which will enable them to make a profit when the car is sold at auction. As I have said before - cut out WBAC .com and consign your vehicle direct to BCA.

As a matter of interest, I recently changed cars and very nearly accepted the WBAC .com offer as it was considerably higher than Mercedes-Benz's initial trade-in offer. The only thing that stopped me was the logistical nightmare of getting home from WBAC's physical site and having no transport until the new car was delivered.

mickjoebill
15th Sep 2016, 21:08
Friends of my neighbour had a house clearing sale last week.

An elderly couple were moving from Oz to U.K. to be with their son.
On Saturday their son was back in town for just 5 days to help them move.
He was under the pump to sort out his parents affairs.

We purchased white goods for one of my kids who has just moved into an apartment.
I spotted a near new car in the old couples' garage. Newer model to our 5 year old runaround and with only 9k kilometres on the clock and over 3 years left on the factory warranty.
Was it for sale?
Yes. So I test drove it on Monday, made an low ball offer of $15k and he accepted.
But this was a catch, it was under finance, and there was a $4k shortfall between sale price and the contract payout amount.
With only three days before he left there was no hope of untangling the paperwork in time.

No way was I going to pay the finance company before his $4k had cleared.

So with nothing more than a handwritten note, I picked up the car last Wednesday and he left on the Thursday.
The paperwork wasn't finalised until yesterday.
So for a week we had both the car on our property and our money in the bank.
Using the free 2 week quote period insurers offer we insured the car.

He was a smart guy, when he arrived back in uk he asked the finance company to release the title when I paid them, even though there was a shortfall in the car lease of $4k. They agreed that he continue to pay the $500 per month (as per existing original lease contract) for 8 months which suited his cash flow.
I received a letter saying they would released their interest in the car on receipt of the sale price. A confirmation letter followed when my funds cleared.
My only fear was that he had simultaneously sold the car for cash to someone else.
But I had the keys, the car and receipts and it's now registered in our name.

It's a very warm feeling when a stranger trusts you..,


Mickjoebill

Mechta
15th Sep 2016, 22:21
I was selling a Tiger once. Bloke phoned up and said 'I'll buy it'.

I said, send me a deposit please, and at least come and look at it!

No, he said.

Next day cheque for the whole price arrived. I smelt a rat....

Cashed the cheque, and waited.....

Low loader arrived for the car and took it away.

Smelled another rat.

Guy was completely genuine.

Its only in the last ten years that the banks have been forced by the Office of Fair Trading to treat cheques as fully cleared. Before that, they could reverse the transaction weeks or even months afterwards. Cheque please- finally you can rely on a cheque (http://forums.contractoruk.com/general/23468-cheque-please-finally-you-can-rely-cheque.html)

I sold a car once to a young lad, only to find after he had gone, that he hadn't paid me. As I had his phone number, I phoned his mother when he was on the way home. She was convinced that in his excitement of buying the car (and mine of getting rid of it) he had simply forgotten to pay me and I had forgotten to ask for the money. I went straight round to their address, and sure enough he had the cash waiting. We had both overlooked that bit!

Mike6567
19th Sep 2016, 20:16
How is it going Loose? Any sign of a sale yet?
Mike

Loose rivets
19th Sep 2016, 22:42
No. Put it on AutoTrader today and had to make the price more realistic since they shout what they think it's worth. Bl:mad:dy Nora. Also, another 56 quid added to the also-cost list.

When I look at it I think, So sexy, I'll keep that! But then the sensible circuits kick in.

What I really need is a car with the performance of a Hoda R and the comfort of a Bently. Oooo, why not a Bently? 560hp, what could possibly go wrong with an old bloke owning one of those.:p

Oh, talking of Honda R's The main dealer still calls me from time to time. He knows I like the power coming out of the back wheels, but still gives me a call when he's board. It seems now that to have a test run in the R, one has to give them 500 smackeroos. You get it back if you don't break it, and I suppose it stops the kids going for a ride.

The R is as daft as a daft thing, really. Not only does it not have a spare, it hasn't got a normal place to jack it up. The belly is a flat plate so it can slip through the atmosphere at Mach .999999999 But, all that power coming out of the front wheels? Mmmm. A bit like the Mini 1275 days, I'd imagine.

Do you remember the police having a few of them? And Daimler Darts. Two big blokes with hats on in those tiny things. Weird, but delightfully 1960's

G-CPTN
19th Sep 2016, 22:50
Many years ago, a guy called Keith Schellenberg was involved with motor racing.

One of the cars that he was sponsoring lost a wheel on the circuit (Croft?) and he was allowed onto the track with his modern saloon Rolls/Bentley (I forget which - I think it must have been a Roller).
After dropping off the spare wheel he did a power-turn on the track and set off back to the pits like a scalded cat.
I was impressed.

Loose rivets
19th Sep 2016, 23:44
I supposed that was when Rolls described the power of their cars as 'adequate'.

onetrack
20th Sep 2016, 04:04
Mickjoebill, I thought I was a trusting soul, but I wouldn't dream of carrying out a car sale in that manner. Just too much in that arrangement to go horribly wrong.

Spunky Monkey
20th Sep 2016, 08:36
I recently was trying to sell a Doxa Diving watch on ebay.
The chap wanted the watch after a bit of haggling.

Then came the catch, he wanted to pay by Escrow, so that we would both be 'covered.' As he lived on 70 miles away I said I would be happier to meet him.
Offer refused.
Proper Rat Odour.
I decided to wind him up a bit, then let the conversation dry up.

I didn't click on the link he sent as it required my details.
So here is the rub, you click on the link, fill in your details to open an Escrow account and hey presto the scammers have all of your details. If they get the watch and then claim it wasn't' delivered its a win win.

I regularly find vehicles that I am selling advertised on ebay by people I have never met in remote parts of the country. One of them it would appear was being sold by a Police Officer!

TIP - ALWAYS WATER-MARK YOUR IMAGES. The apps are free and very easy to use.

We Buy Any Car - Is owned by British Car Auctions. They offer you a price, you take your car in to be valued, they reduce the value (professional tyre kicking) then I believe they charge you an administration fee. The car then ends up in an auction at British Car Auctions.
The vehicle is then bought by a trader. Easy money for all parties.
The loser = You.

How do I know?

I work at a small auction house in the UK between flights.
I am happy to give any advice I can to stop people being scammed.
Loose Rivets, I am happy to list your vehicle for you for free and no commission charges. PM me, or look up - (Mods, I don't want to fall foul of advertising rules - so feel free to edit this) - William George and Co

UniFoxOs
20th Sep 2016, 08:51
finally you can rely on a cheque

But only after it has appeared in your account. Takes too long for most people and "express clearing" is expensive, if it's still available. Cash is king.

ian16th
20th Sep 2016, 21:51
G-CPTN
Many years ago, a guy called Keith Schellenberg was involved with motor racing.
He had a vintage Bentley that he entered in the endurance rally's.

He also was a breeder of note, of Alsatian's. When we were courting, my wife to be's family had one from him. I was more scared of the dog, than her father.

Loose rivets
21st Sep 2016, 00:36
Spunky Monkey, uncommonly kind of you. One will PM you with great haste.

Spunky Monkey
21st Sep 2016, 18:03
That is no problem, I have just sent you a text.
Let me know what I can do to help.
Speak Soon.

Effluent Man
22nd Sep 2016, 04:47
It's the logistics that Webuyanycar rely on. Most people live a fair way from their sites
And they charge a paperwork fee to start the deal. I suppose once the seller has gone to the effort and expense to get there they are vulnerable to the knock back.

The company then finds the smallest reason to knock back their offer price, tyres getting thin, minor dents etc. I have bought several cars from people who have had their offers, I just offer to match them in cash and pick the car up from them or drive them home if they come to me. The last one was a Vauxhall Corsa, Webuy offered 1600, I matched it, put the car on sale at 2695 and sold it within a week. Both seller and buyer were happy.

onetrack
22nd Sep 2016, 05:28
Ooh, that was a nice lil' earner, Arfur! A thousand quid profit! Most car yards can only dream of that kind of profit, down here in the underworld. :)

Dan_Brown
22nd Sep 2016, 06:16
Serves you right for buying a BMW in the first place, or any K**t car for that matter.

Effluent Man
22nd Sep 2016, 08:59
That doesn't leave much unless you intend to buy French or Italian, neither of which are that good. I suppose there is a Pearl Harbour Deal if you want to be bored.

jimtherev
22nd Sep 2016, 18:18
When you get to my age, bored can be good. Spent quite enough time sideways (and occasionally upside down) during my rallying period.
Today I tend to get me excitement in other ways...

Stanwell
22nd Sep 2016, 18:24
Just remember to change hands at ninety-nine, though. ;)

EGLD
22nd Sep 2016, 18:42
No. Put it on AutoTrader today and had to make the price more realistic since they shout what they think it's worth. Bl:mad:dy Nora. Also, another 56 quid added to the also-cost list.

When I look at it I think, So sexy, I'll keep that! But then the sensible circuits kick in.

What I really need is a car with the performance of a Hoda R and the comfort of a Bently. Oooo, why not a Bently? 560hp, what could possibly go wrong with an old bloke owning one of those.:p

Oh, talking of Honda R's The main dealer still calls me from time to time. He knows I like the power coming out of the back wheels, but still gives me a call when he's board. It seems now that to have a test run in the R, one has to give them 500 smackeroos. You get it back if you don't break it, and I suppose it stops the kids going for a ride.

The R is as daft as a daft thing, really. Not only does it not have a spare, it hasn't got a normal place to jack it up. The belly is a flat plate so it can slip through the atmosphere at Mach .999999999 But, all that power coming out of the front wheels? Mmmm. A bit like the Mini 1275 days, I'd imagine.

Do you remember the police having a few of them? And Daimler Darts. Two big blokes with hats on in those tiny things. Weird, but delightfully 1960's

what on earth is a Honda R

that Civic piece of crap?

Effluent Man
22nd Sep 2016, 19:57
My son refers to the Civic R as a "Tree Magnet".

notapilot15
22nd Sep 2016, 20:05
Obviously scammers know PayPal rules better than occasional buyer/seller, got scammed for $450 and PayPal didn't help at all.