PDA

View Full Version : Beeb Headlines today. What do you think about this painting?


Loose rivets
13th Sep 2016, 11:37
Not the issue of being banned from taking from Oz, but the picture itself; the quality of the painting but also the detail and clues to life at that point in history.

I've tried to copy it to my Iconic Photos folder but it won't let me. It has however been accepted as a Desktop picture. Surely there is some way I can save it from there?

Anyway, enjoy.

Australian Snack Bar painting ruled too important to send to UK - BBC News (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-australia-37335542)

G-CPTN
13th Sep 2016, 11:40
Not the issue of being banned from taking from Oz, but the picture itself; the quality of the painting but also the detail and clues to life at that point in history.
Australian Snack Bar painting ruled too important to send to UK - BBC News (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-australia-37335542)
Will banning the export of this painting result in it being seen in public in Oz?

Loose rivets
13th Sep 2016, 11:41
As the thread was wrongly placed, I'll copy the first answer here:


G-CPTN replied. Will banning the export of this painting result in it being seen in public in Oz?

meadowrun
13th Sep 2016, 11:55
Spent most of my looking trying to identify the food and drink.
Anyone know what that tall brown bottle on the left with the white ring and white top contains?

SpringHeeledJack
13th Sep 2016, 11:56
Reminds me of 'The Sullivans', a much loved OZ TV series from the 80's.

As to whether it will be displayed, that will depend on the owner who, AFAIK is under no obligation to show the work. No doubt, with all the publicity, the owner will 'lend' it to a museum in Sydney/Melbourne/Canberra so that the good people of OZ can see the multiculcha society in it's infancy….

Cazalet33
13th Sep 2016, 12:10
http://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/660/cpsprodpb/F9AC/production/_91161936_9612c510-9b04-4e32-8efd-caaf751404e1.jpg

If it's in private ownership then surely it is for the owner to decide where (within Australia) to hang his property.

G0ULI
13th Sep 2016, 12:51
Up there with Hogarth in terms of characterisation. Nice.

oldchina
13th Sep 2016, 12:52
Much ado about nothing. It's only a painting for christsake. Australia has so much more to be proud of.

DirtyProp
13th Sep 2016, 13:35
Australia has so much more to be proud of.
Like what? Can't think of anything. :E

Hat, coat....

bgbazz
13th Sep 2016, 13:46
My guess is those bottles contain tomato sauce (ketchup)...notice they are all sitting very close to the salt and pepper.

onetrack
13th Sep 2016, 14:10
The bottles are almost certainly, Rosella brand, Tomato sauce bottles. An Aussie icon from way back.

http://resources0.news.com.au/images/2013/08/14/1226696/663736-rosella.jpg

A fascinating snapshot of Wartime Sydney, with many of the faces displaying almost caricature-type features.

I'd have to say the artist has pictured a number of the characters in various stages of inebriation. A not uncommon symptom of the inner-Sydney scene in those days.

Today, the pictured individuals would nearly all be gays, with a smattering of thuggish Middle Easterners, and various other Eastern Europeans, all involved in the Kings Cross nightclub, strip club, and drug scene.

Effluent Man
13th Sep 2016, 14:11
I'm with Gouli on this, I like it.

G-CPTN
13th Sep 2016, 14:16
The thing about such Wartime scenes is the absence of young males (other than those in uniform - in this case US forces).
What was a young woman to do during the most fertile years of her life other than collaborate?

Sue VÍtements
13th Sep 2016, 14:36
How come there's nobody fighting? :}





I quite like it though

Hempy
13th Sep 2016, 14:43
The thing about such Wartime scenes is the absence of young males (other than those in uniform - in this case US forces).
What was a young woman to do during the most fertile years of her life other than collaborate?

The sad part is that whilst the Yanks were enjoying the Sydney social life, Australians were dying in MacArthurs 'mopping up' operations.

pattern_is_full
13th Sep 2016, 15:13
How can one possibly eat one's meat-pie floater without tomato sauce? Although in wartime, perhaps "meatless-pie floater" was the operative recipe.

I'm intrigued by the - gallons - of hard-boiled eggs, foreground and background. Was that a common protein-substitute (possibly home-raised) due to meat rationing?

Cazalet33
13th Sep 2016, 15:25
I'm with Gouli too. I like the picture and the Hogarth analogy is apt.

It's just a pity the Strines couldn't have restricted overseas travel by Rupert Murdoch; Kylie Minogue; Jason Donovan; and that loud-mouthed qunt on the BBCtv morning finance report too.

onetrack
13th Sep 2016, 15:38
I wouldn't get too cut up about it, Hempy. Sizeable numbers of young American flyers in fighters and bombers, died in the early air defence actions against the Japanese, flying from the freshly established bases in the N.T., QLD, and New Guinea, during 1942.

These blokes were very effectively stopping the Japs from their move South into Australia, and they paid the ultimate price.
The whole WW2 story could have been a lot different for Australia, if not for their valiant efforts in helping to stop the Japs in their tracks.

United States 5th AF memorial (http://monumentaustralia.org.au/themes/conflict/ww2/display/92837-united-states-5th-air-force-memorial/)

onetrack
13th Sep 2016, 15:53
pattern-is-full - Eggs were generally readily available in Australia during WW2, although rationing was introduced in 1942 for meat, butter, tea and sugar. But even the rations were quite generous, unlike Britain.

Rationing in Australia - WW2 (https://www.awm.gov.au/encyclopedia/homefront/rationing/)

Australia produced substantial amounts of food for its population size, and huge numbers of food parcels went from Australia to Britain, even during WW2.

After the end of WW2, the volume of food (grain, and meat & dairy products, mostly) sent to Britain by Australia, was quite astounding - and this substantial level of food assistance continued up to about 1950, due to the inability of the U.K. to fully feed its population for several years after WW2.

Cazalet33
13th Sep 2016, 16:38
Those 'rations' are astonishingly generous.

That's more sugar and tea and than I could possibly consume in the ration period. The meat ration is about what I eat normally. With eggs and fish being unrationed, it's a bloody good deal. No hardship there.

ian16th
13th Sep 2016, 20:27
Cazalet33
With eggs and fish being unrationed, it's a bloody good deal. No hardship there.
As far as I know fish was never rationed in the UK.

Being a sprog at the time, and living on the coast I didn't understand that I was lucky and had fresh fish about 5 days a week.

Mother saving the 'meat ration' for the weekend.

We used to go down and meet the boats beaching, and buy the fish directly from the fishermen. I don't think that any ever left the town.

evansb
13th Sep 2016, 20:50
I love the painting.

Food for wartime Britain indeed!

Quote:By the end of the war, it was estimated that Canadian exports accounted for 57 per cent of British wheat and flour consumption – down from its 1941 peak of 77 per cent – as well as 39 per cent of bacon, 15 per cent of eggs, 24 per cent of cheese, and 11 per cent of evaporated milk consumed in Britain. Much of this was achieved through major state intervention on Canadian farms. Between 1940 and 1943, the wheat acreage in the Prairie provinces was reduced by 42 percent through a combination of subsidies, price guarantees, and other controls. Areas sown for agricultural products needed to meet gaps in Canada’s domestic and export requirements like feed grains, on the other hand, increased by 72 percent, flaxseed by 800 percent, and hog marketings by 250 percent over the prewar period. end quote.