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Sue VÍtements
9th Sep 2016, 17:13
One of the best things about working in IT is they're starting to do a lot of work-from-home now. No driving to the office so it's safer and you can get up a little later too. However I've noticed that I've also stopped bathing on a regular basis - I've even got to the point where I occasionally where yesterday's clothes too! :}

Don't get me wrong I still have a shower and make myself presentable if I'm meeting other humans.

Am I the only one? :uhoh:




FWIW - I dislike getting wet

Saintsman
9th Sep 2016, 17:25
I shower every day.

Whether I need it or not!

Evanelpus
9th Sep 2016, 17:48
Shower twice a day at the very least, before work and after tea.

Rwy in Sight
9th Sep 2016, 17:49
During the last several weeks I take two showers per day since I can't stand the feeling of sweating. And I do shower every day or so (and definitely so if I am to go out). Having said so I do enjoy the first shower after a couple of days of going unwashed.

And I do tend to shave everyday.

VP959
9th Sep 2016, 18:17
Showering (or having a bath) is, I think, a habit, rather than a strict necessity. I just have a routine (like most people, I suspect) which means I take a shower in the morning, Logically this doesn't really make sense, but my wife does it and I've just fallen into the same pattern.

Showering (in reality back then, having a bath) before bed was normal when I was a child, and seemed to be the pattern for most people. I can't recall my parents having a bath in the morning, either. Logically it seems more sensible to bathe in the evening, having got grubby/sweaty during the day.

Years ago I had a good friend, and he and his two partners (yes, all three shared the same very large bed) never washed at all, except for getting dirt off their hands or feet. None of them ever washed their hair, either. I only found out about their habit of never bathing when helping him with a big building project in the converted chapel they lived in. It didn't have a bath or shower, just a composting toilet, and I innocently asked where their shower was. It was only then that they all explained that they never bathed, but that they did put on clean clothes twice a day.

None of them smelt, or looked dirty, in fact if they hadn't told me about never bathing then I'd never have guessed. Their explanation for their lack of body odour was that it was clothes that collected the bacteria that make the odour, and putting on clean clothing, that absorbed sweat and allowed the skin to keep itself clean stopped them having any noticeable body odour. They didn't use deodorants or put anything on their skin, either, and their hands reminded me of tanned, very smooth and soft, leather.

Not for everyone, I guess, but I do think we probably over do the whole body washing thing, and create a host of skin problems that would probably go away if we just stopped washing. Doesn't mean I'm going to give it a try, though................

Loose rivets
9th Sep 2016, 18:27
My great aunt used to get hold of one of my ears and tug it forward. "you could grow potatoes in that dirt" she'd say, and I'd go to a corner and scratch the mud* out with me fingernails. However, one was obliged to 'splash your face' before going to school. I can only imagine what the teachers thought of the aroma of us kids. Mud, sweat and old Wellies. Poor sods, no wonder they hit us so much.

I was just thinking today about being hauled up by the stern 'Auntie' because I'd left the (only) bathroom type sink so black with wet grot that it was hard to see the porcelain.

I suppose on reflection, I must have washed behind my ears.:}


I lodged for a couple of nights with a family that took in pilots for B&B. It was only a couple of nights because I wanted a bath after a hard day's flying and they had to move about 40 little glass figures from the bath surround. When I wanted the second bath, I got told to find other accommodation.



*Walton backwater mud was wondrous stuff, one could leap into ponds when the tide was out and skid along on the rich black surface. Years later I was one of the first people in the UK to be trying to water ski. Somewhere there's an 8mm film of me having 'got up' on skies for the first time by slipping off the mud and into the water. First time I went splat on my face but second time I was up. I went down the river, half black and half sort of spotty white.:p

Seven thousand acre playground. One didn't realise until too late how lucky we were.

ShyTorque
9th Sep 2016, 18:53
To kill two birds with one stone, bearing in mind your other thread...

I used to bathe regularly in prison.

I was too scared to bend over in the shower.

Sue VÍtements
9th Sep 2016, 19:01
It would make more sense to take a bath at night because it takes so long - and you end up sort of knackered afterwards. Having said that the argument about cleaning off the day's grime ... wait for it ... holds water :}

I prefer to shower in the morning though as I find it a good way to aid the waking up process. In fact I've not had a bath since Port Said in 1956.!



ok, there's ten points if you can get that last reference - hint, the initials JRJ are involved

Pontius Navigator
9th Sep 2016, 19:02
Regularly? Once a week used to be the norm, a clean shirt Monday, clean underpants at least weekly.

But back to working from home, one of the female journalists wrote that she much prefers to work nude would do so in the office if she could.

That at least gets round the question of wearing yesterday's clothes. As there is plenty of natural ventilation there is or less sweating so that would solve that issue too.

Ascend Charlie
9th Sep 2016, 19:06
This thread is reinforcing the old joke:

Where is the safest place in England to hide your money?

Under the soap.

dazdaz1
9th Sep 2016, 19:39
In the old days, one bath per week on a Sunday I don't think most houses had showers in the mid 50s

oldchina
9th Sep 2016, 19:53
Remember this was the most powerful nation on earth before WW11

Slum photographs spark charity appeal - BBC News (http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-birmingham-37288396)

Pontius Navigator
9th Sep 2016, 20:33
Fax, we used to have shower in the winter, say 47 or so, until my father soldered the pipes.

We had a galvanised tub, heated on the stove (luxury) and washed on the kitchen floor. We were posh, we had a bathroom but the kitchen was warmer.

Danny42 will remember the military utility showers, bare concrete stalls of adequate size for undernourished 40s troops. You pulled a chain for water. When wet you let go, soaped your little pink body, pulled chain, and washed off soap. You often had to let go the chain to wash off the soap.

Tankertrashnav
9th Sep 2016, 20:53
Shower every morning to wake myself up. Paying out for a big walk-in shower a few years ago was the best money I've spent on my house, I reckon.

Haven't had a bath (as such) in yonks - seems like such a faff to me. As for lying around in scummy water and reading, smoking a pipe or whatever - doesn't the water go cold? Then there's that scented candles thing - ok for the girlies, I suppose, but Mrs TTN is a shower fan too, so we save on candles!

rans6andrew
9th Sep 2016, 21:01
No! I bathe (usually shower) irregularly as and when I think I need it. If I didn't do it often enough my partner would no doubt tell me and so far she hasn't. I do usually wash the key areas at the bathroom hand basin when I wet shave in the morning. I have worked at home for many years now and rarely have to dress properly for work. If I am going to be here all day I dress to suit the temperature of the day. A couple of weeks ago that meant wearing nothing some days. This way I avoid getting hot and sweaty. I quite like being naked as well. Similarly, if it is warm at night we don't bother with a duvet or sheet/blankets and I always sleep in the buff. Recently, when it was warmish in the night we put an old double size blanket into a king size duvet cover and then only pulled it over us half way through the night. Sleeping with nothing at all over you seems strange for the first couple of nights but then it is great, no waking up hot and stuffy.

SASless
9th Sep 2016, 21:15
Central Heat, Showers, and Dental Hygiene....civilized concepts lost on the vast majority of Brits might I assume?

Tankertrashnav
9th Sep 2016, 21:24
Sasless I think at least one of your assumptions is false, but please don't let the facts spoil a (very old) joke!

Americans do not have better teeth than the British, study concludes - Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/news/12054216/Americans-do-not-have-better-teeth-than-the-British-study-concludes.html)

Just had my latest dental checkup. Contrary to popular belief we don't have free dentistry - it cost me all of £19!

Now off for a shower and relax in my centrally heated house (it's getting chilly in the evenings already).

Rosevidney1
9th Sep 2016, 21:57
My wife virtually lives in the shower. I much prefer a bath, cool(ish) in Summer and hot at other times. Lovely!

Pontius Navigator
9th Sep 2016, 22:19
I bathe as often as I can on a warm day with the water at 25-28 degrees. Takes about 4_strokes one end to the other. I shall stop bathing in a week or so.

sitigeltfel
9th Sep 2016, 22:55
Shower at least twice a day and have half an hour in the pool, morning and late afternoon.

A French friend asked me once what we called the thing we placed our shirts on at night. He was a bit confused when I said "laundry basket".

vapilot2004
9th Sep 2016, 23:05
Other than my once a day evening wash up, I also shower after swimming, pooping, or sweating.

Pace
9th Sep 2016, 23:08
The French are very hygienic using a bidet to wash after using the toilet much better than toilet paper

I remember not long back a very lazy mother reported in the media who kept her kids in school uniform so she wouldn't have to dress them in the morning!

It's a bit like washing hair ? Nature dictates that hair had its own natural oils which we wash off every day
As in nature the body would be exposed to the air and elements! We have evolved to covering it with clothes where sweat gathers and becomes stale

Bathing is probably more to do with being appealing and fresh for your partner rather than stale and smelly

TangoAlphad
9th Sep 2016, 23:12
Rans6andrew I do hope you are kidding!

Shower in the morning on working days and days off I'll maybe have a lazy morning and shower after brunch or sometime but always before leaving the house but never go a day without a shower. If it has been a very sunny day at work the Saab acts as a greenhouse so I'll probably have a quick shower when I get home too.

Flight_Idle
9th Sep 2016, 23:18
Armpits become less piquant with age, so youthful camping goes out the door.

I now shave my armpits & shower every day, even new socks, shirt & shreddies every day now. How times have changed!

RedhillPhil
10th Sep 2016, 00:46
There's this terrible idea that not washing twice a day somehow makes one filthy and smelly. Not many of us do hard manual labour nowadays, it's mostly a con spread about by Americans and detergent manufacturers.
Personally I have a three day cycle.
Day one shower (37 degrees) with soap and wash hair.
Day two shower (37 degrees) water sans soap except for drainage/coupling system which gets soap wash.
Day three the same.
Day four as per day one. Repeat ad infinitum unless a specific reason - severe gardening on a hot day perhaps - in which case as per day one again.
Undywear gets changed as part of the three day cycle as does socks and shirt.
Thus far no complaints from wife, ladyfriend, dog or neighbours.
First wife used to shower twice a day. Always suffered from various skin complaints.

obgraham
10th Sep 2016, 04:00
Being Lancashire bred, and all, me Mum made me take a bath every Saturday night.

If it was good enough for her, it's good enough for me. 70 years on, same habits.

Neighbors dont seem to visit like they used to, though.

onetrack
10th Sep 2016, 04:13
It all depends on your definition of "regularly", I guess? Regularly, every Christmas Eve? :eek:

Aussies have a neat piece of slang - "Dry as a Poms towel". That's very dry, as in never been wet. :)

I often wonder what the seafarers of old smelt like (c. 17th, 18th centuries), after a 6 month voyage to the far end of the Earth?
They struggled to get enough water to drink, let alone wash in. I guess the odd unexpected king wave breaching the gunnels would give them the irregular bath, even if it was a salt bath.

parabellum
10th Sep 2016, 07:29
First wife used to shower twice a day. Always suffered from various skin complaints.


Wife was reading from an article in an Australian woman's magazine recently that said over showering was bad for the skin, aim for every other day if possible, regard the non-shower day as a 'Skin Care Day'! :)

VP959
10th Sep 2016, 08:15
It's as I wrote above about my three friends who never washed, yet didn't smell and had very healthy sklin (and hair).

After a time, the body gets back to self-cleansing, as it did before we became obsessed with washing it very frequently.

The smell problem is mainly to do with our clothes soaking up sweat and dirt and becoming breeding grounds for bacteria.

I do agree with the idea of the bidet (or squatters with a tap that perform the same function). We didn't have room for one, so I installed a shattaff mixer shower head alongside the toilet that performs much the same function. It really is a million times better than smearing poo around one's backside with a bit of paper...............

Pontius Navigator
10th Sep 2016, 08:48
One track, they were surrounded by the stuff. On board ship in the 50s, and this a post-war cargo-passenger ship, we had salt water baths. To go with that as we had salt-water soap as domestic soap would not lather.

sitigeltfel
10th Sep 2016, 08:56
With the thermometer still hitting the low 30s, and young ladies parading around in minimal attire, a couple of cold showers each day are required. :E

Pontius Navigator
10th Sep 2016, 08:59
At school we were allowed a bath once a week, unless muddy after rugby in which case the lucky one got the clean water. As juniors it was also 2 at once.

Also there was a saying 'cast ne'er a clout until May is out'

My winter routine was school shirt and sweater off together, shorts off, PJ s on. In the morning PJ s off and shirt and sweater on before getting out of bed. Shirt and shorts were grey and the shirt had a bib front. Remember houses were unheated. When it was very cold we had an Aladdin stove in the hall, basically turned paraffin into water which would freeze on my bedroom window. The bedroom had an open ventilation brick in the wall.

Pontius Navigator
10th Sep 2016, 09:04
VP, how things have changed - grass, cloth on a stick (communal), rags, newspaper. Bronco Government Property, soft tissue, flannel, bidet, and now disposable wet wipes.

Toadstool
10th Sep 2016, 09:43
I shower every morning and after each session in the gym or after a run.

The only time I don't bathe is if I'm in the hills or woods.

VP959
10th Sep 2016, 10:20
VP, how things have changed - grass, cloth on a stick (communal), rags, newspaper. Bronco Government Property, soft tissue, flannel, bidet, and now disposable wet wipes.
Every time I use our "bum washing shower head" I'm reminded of the Romans, with their communal toilets and shared bit of sponge on the end of a stick, sat in a jar of vinegar and passed around as needed......................

Wet wipes are the invention of the devil as far as our sewage system is concerned. I've had to ban their use, as I was fed up with unblocking the drains. The things seem to be near-indestructible and very buoyant, causing them to stick to pipes and build up over time.

Falcon Al
10th Sep 2016, 11:26
The more I shower the more old T shirts I keep finding.

Pontius Navigator
10th Sep 2016, 11:46
The more I shower the more old T shirts I keep finding.
That boggles the mind

Pace
10th Sep 2016, 11:49
I do agree with the idea of the bidet (or squatters with a tap that perform the same function). We didn't have room for one, so I installed a shattaff mixer shower head alongside the toilet that performs much the same function. It really is a million times better than smearing poo around one's backside with a bit of paper...............

When you consider the amount of loo rolls we must use, the blockages they cause in our sewer system, the needless trees cut down to make them and how ineffective they are at properly cleaning you a small shower head attached to all toilets is a far better method

Fareastdriver
10th Sep 2016, 12:15
The Far East Air Force helicopter squadrons had hot water and showers when operating in the sticks sorted. Hot water was via a 44 gallon drum laid on its side with the small vent at the top and a hole was drilled halfway down the vent side so as to take a large funnel. The vent had a length of pipe and a connector that was threaded into the vent screw so that it projected from the top of the drum for about a foot or so. The drum was mounted above a heat source, wood or a petrol burner, and filled with water. When the water was hot enough hot water was extracted by pouring cold water down the funnel which would push the same amount into a bucket underneath the vent pipe. In this way the hot water was effectively continuous.

The shower arrangements were in the form of plastic 2 gallon buckets with the bottom drilled to take a spring valve and a shower rose. On the side of the shower stall was a rope which via a pulley would lift the bucket directly above you. Attached to the bucket valve was a string which when pulled opened the valve to allow the contents to flow down through the rose, and could be controlled by releasing the string.

Take a plastic bucket full of cold water to the boiler. Place bucket already there underneath the overflow and pour water into boiler which will cause the second bucket will fill up with hot water. Take hot water to shower and lower shower bucket. Fill that up; hoist it above with the rope and use the two gallons, more than sufficient, to have a shower. Should you be a shower addict take two buckets of hot water to the shower.

We used to average about fifteen to twenty personnel on an upcountry exercise. The 44 gall drum had no trouble supplying hot water for a 4 stall shower.

Pontius Navigator
10th Sep 2016, 12:36
The only time I don't bathe is if I'm in the hills or woods.
Best time to shower. Ever tried an air bath? All hot and sweaty, clothes off, let the body breathe.

Daughters, 2 and 4, Dava Moor in the Highlands, dusk approaching and still more than an hour from home. They dried off, into jimjams, and off to sleep.

yellowtriumph
10th Sep 2016, 13:08
It's as I wrote above about my three friends who never washed, yet didn't smell and had very healthy sklin (and hair).

After a time, the body gets back to self-cleansing, as it did before we became obsessed with washing it very frequently.

The smell problem is mainly to do with our clothes soaking up sweat and dirt and becoming breeding grounds for bacteria.

I do agree with the idea of the bidet (or squatters with a tap that perform the same function). We didn't have room for one, so I installed a shattaff mixer shower head alongside the toilet that performs much the same function. It really is a million times better than smearing poo around one's backside with a bit of paper...............
What is the 'interface' between your bidet shower head and your bottom. Or does it work entirely on water pressure? (Perhaps I'm getting too personal!).

yellowtriumph
10th Sep 2016, 13:18
At school we were allowed a bath once a week, unless muddy after rugby in which case the lucky one got the clean water. As juniors it was also 2 at once.

Also there was a saying 'cast ne'er a clout until May is out'

My winter routine was school shirt and sweater off together, shorts off, PJ s on. In the morning PJ s off and shirt and sweater on before getting out of bed. Shirt and shorts were grey and the shirt had a bib front. Remember houses were unheated. When it was very cold we had an Aladdin stove in the hall, basically turned paraffin into water which would freeze on my bedroom window. The bedroom had an open ventilation brick in the wall.
Aladdin stove !! - luxury! As children we got up in our PJ's and Mum allowed us to rest our feet to warm up in the gas oven. Then the PJ's caught fire one day and that was the end of that.

We lived in a council house, there was bathroom off the kitchen but we could never get to it because the kitchen table was in front of it as the kitchen was so small. A bath each week consisted of me sitting in a sort of waterproofed paper cache cockleshell shaped effort on top of the kitchen table filled up with water boiled up on the aforementioned gas stove. I was only about 5 or 6 at the time, don't know what Mum and Dad did. Happy days though.

I shower everyday now, can't remember the last time I had a bath. I wonder if it's related to my childhood experiences related above? Until I became an adult I regarded showers as a luxury item that only 'posh' people had, in a small way I wonder in the back of my mind if I still think of taking a shower as a luxury rather than a nicety.

Sue VÍtements
10th Sep 2016, 14:08
You lived in a council house?!!???! We dreamed of having council ouse!

paper [m]ache cockleshell shaped effort on top of the kitchen tableThat almost sounds like half a drop tank. How close to WW2 was it?

VP959
10th Sep 2016, 14:11
What is the 'interface' between your bidet shower head and your bottom. Or does it work entirely on water pressure? (Perhaps I'm getting too personal!).
You use soap (or whatever surfactant you prefer) and your hand, Middle East fashion.

In practice, the warm water jet removes 99% of anything first, so all you're really doing with your hand is to soap the area to get it really clean. As the kid in the wet wipes TV advert says here, you "feel clean as a squid".

It's better than a bidet, in my view, as a bidet usually means using your hand and soap for the whole job. Probably not as good as a Japanese toilet, with its retractable nozzle, settings for "front or rear bottom" and warm air drying, but my wife refused point blank when I suggested we fit one of those.

I haven't used toilet paper (at least at home) for several years now, and if I have to, say when staying at a hotel, then I definitely feel less clean.

Sue VÍtements
10th Sep 2016, 14:19
I have to say that wiping your arse with paper always seemed a particularly pointless exercise. I mean if you trod mud all over your carpet, you wouldn't get some paper, dab it about a bit then think that it was clean. No you'd do a proper cleaning job with a proper cleaner.

The worst one is when you DO have a shower, THEN foolishly drink your morning coffee, only to suddenly realise you have to run to the bog because there's another mighty sequoia that needs to make its journey to the pacific :*


Toilets are probably bad for you as well. Next time, try climbing onto the seat and squatting. It's a marked improvement, though sometimes difficult to do at work or a friend's house

Pontius Navigator
10th Sep 2016, 14:19
VP, I had ordered some wet wipes from a Riverine Company but fllowing your comments checked reviews. All 5* except for 1* that said the biodegradable was practically indestructible and clogged the drains. We have a very long drain run that I have to unblock frequently ever since we had an EU minimal water use flush - in UK I ask you.

I have now cancelled my order.

G-CPTN
10th Sep 2016, 14:27
The house next to mine is occupied by a single (separated) lady.
The drains became blocked shortly after she moved in.
The plumber had to break open the external downpipe from the toilet to remove the bundle of 'wipes' that had accumulated.
No children have lived there for more than a decade - just single women (so we aren't talking of baby wipes).

VP959
10th Sep 2016, 14:48
It's apparently costing the water companies millions, and costs more each year as more and more people use the things:

Bin It - Don't Block it | Thames Water (http://binit.thameswater.co.uk/)

Cleaning wipes 'blocking drains' - BBC News (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-13566476)

How the growing trend of using wet wipes instead of toilet roll costs Thames Water £12m a year to fix | Daily Mail Online (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2223482/How-growing-trend-using-wet-wipes-instead-toilet-roll-costs-Thames-Water-12m-year-fix.html)

Pace
10th Sep 2016, 14:59
I used to be in the restaurant trade years back and the public toilets were regularly blocked.
When they were unblocked what was found there would turn your stomach and shows how filthy and sickening some people can be

glad rag
10th Sep 2016, 14:59
zHloFGyEkuI

and for further delectation

zJXWa7Annak

Pontius Navigator
10th Sep 2016, 15:07
Sue, the Nordic solution is a continuous sleeve that is no tired around the seat. New for every bum

ShyTorque
10th Sep 2016, 15:09
I once lived in a place with servants quarters (and we employed a servant - oh, how the mighty have fallen..).

The servants toilet was a hole in the floor, so squatting was the only way to go, literally. The shower was also in the same "wet" room so the toilet also served as the shower drain. A good idea imho but a problem if you dropped the soap or your facecloth whilst showering.

This house used to have a bidet. We had to remove it when the large bathroom was split into two rooms to be more practical for our increasing family. I wish it hadn't gone.

Pontius Navigator
10th Sep 2016, 16:45
ShyTorque, stayed in a B&B in Alexandropilus, it had a long communal bathroom. At the far end was a toilet, at the near end a shower with a 270deg curtain.


Before we had a chance to use it the distraught owner stopped us. A family from a country to the west of India had been in and all had crapped in the shower. Of course the plug hole was too small.

Tankertrashnav
10th Sep 2016, 17:29
Living out in the sticks we have both a private water supply (from a borehole) and a septic tank. Being entirely responsible for any sewage problems which may arise has cured us of the habit of flushing wet wipes down the bog, pouring fat down the kitchen sink etc. Unfortunately for most of the population it's a case of "out of sight, out of mind" (round the bend, literally!), hence the problems referred to by VP959 and Pace.

Pontius Navigator
10th Sep 2016, 18:00
Glad rag, looked at the videos, nothing new there then. Don't think I could manage that today. I might get down but doubt I would get up again. All right too if you wear a skirt and no knickers.

Now at Stavrouni Monastery off the Nicosia road they had a simple hole in the floor, no porcelain, and a long drop down the mountain. The good bit was a wooden pole, inclined at about 20 degree from the vertical which initially covered the hole but which you could hold for support.

bcgallacher
10th Sep 2016, 18:08
If you marry a Filipina you will find that your ideas of sufficient bathing are completely unacceptable - they are without doubt the cleanest women in the world and will insist you bathe as often as they do.

skylimey
10th Sep 2016, 18:11
For the PPruners who can't actually climb onto the Loo, check out the Squatty Potty. My wife loves it.

Pontius Navigator
10th Sep 2016, 18:18
Skylimey, as in the second video clip.

In contrast, on one cruise ship, the toilet in the spa was raised and your feet barely touched the floor .

Rwy in Sight
10th Sep 2016, 20:26
G-CPTN, if I remember correctly from my UK universities day and the residence houses there was not a bin on the communal bathroom which was used by both sexes.

And I am still supporter for a morning shower - one at night would keep me awake.

SASless
10th Sep 2016, 20:50
My monthly Water Bill is between 14-18 US Dollars....I will shower anytime the urge/opportunity/need allows/provides/demands. Soap is cheap and I was raised by a very strict Mom who believed Cleanliness was next to Godliness and as how I fell from Grace on the Religion thing....scrubbing up is the closest I shall come to Salvation I reckon.

For comparison....a giant glass of Beer is 5 US Dollars in my favorite Drinking Establishment. I usually drink more than I spend all month on Water for cooking, clothes washing, car washing, motorcycle washing, watering critters, and scrubbing up myself.

Now why would ya'll be so sparing with the Soap and Water?:rolleyes:

This "Bathing" hangup some of ya'll have is quite confusing to me.:*

Why ever would you want to splash water you are sitting in.... onto your face?:uhoh:

Pontius Navigator
10th Sep 2016, 20:56
G-CPTN, confidentially, I don't think bunny boilers were in general use in the 70s, flush and forget was the order of the day. Someone I know well only stopped after a No 1 stoppage.

In Cyprus and a number of European countries it is normal to bin the bog paper. In Caribbean once we were given two sheets - use both sides

Fareastdriver
11th Sep 2016, 10:15
When using a squat toilet remember to take all the loose change out of your pockets first.

Flight_Idle
11th Sep 2016, 19:33
It may be a little known fact on this forum, but in the early seventies Airman's toilet paper was highly abrasive & had 'Government property' stamped on each individual sheet.

I had a few shocks in the first days of joining up, but the toilet paper really took the biscuit & several thoughts went through my mind...

(1) The 'Government property' thing, WHO THE HELL WOULD WANT TO STEAL IT! Absolutely no chance of selling it to any civilians who respect their bottoms, maybe not the three ply embossed toilet tissue of today, but even in those days, they had soft serviceable tissue.

(2) At first, I thought it was a wind up & went to another cubicle & to my utter horror the same was offered in ALL cubicles.

(3) It gradually dawned upon me that service life is not the same as civilian life.

(4) Serendipity kicked in & I was sent on Easter leave within one week. On returning, I brought back several 'Civilised rolls of toilet tissue' hid them, but was a little worried about being put on a charge for using 'Non issue kit'.

I certainly wasn't the best recruit they had & I think they were glad to get rid of me.

Sue VÍtements
11th Sep 2016, 19:49
I remember that stuff in civilian life. Flat square packets and individual sheets pulled out, then when you went to fold them, rather than folding or crumpling they merely creased making dagger like points to rake across your sphinky.

Oddly they seemed to be more popular in the South than oop North (where it's grim)


If you don't believe me, read this link (http://forums.digitalspy.co.uk/showthread.php?t=1485107)

Pontius Navigator
11th Sep 2016, 20:23
In Ascension Island when I went to the train station I found there was a toilet on the platform. The roof was long gone but there was an entire serviceable roll of Bronco Government Property on the roll holder. Sadly there was no water for a flush.

G-CPTN
11th Sep 2016, 20:31
Bronco was ideal for 'comb and paper' kazoo.

Current quilted stuff just doesn't work.

radarman
11th Sep 2016, 20:34
VP559 hit the nail on the head a few posts ago when he alluded to the fact that in many cases the cause of the pong is not directly caused by the body, but by the accumulation of sweat on clothes. I used to work with a guy (single - so no woman to give him advice) who sweated like a pig and stunk to high heaven. When at last we plucked up courage to tackle him about it we discovered he was puzzled and embarrassed about the offence he was causing because he took great pains to shower every morning. It was Mrs r who realised the problem was his bachelor's habit of wearing the same shirt two or three days in succession. His armpits were clean every morning, but as soon as he put on the shirt from the day before, the collection of bacteria that had festered overnight leaped into action with the body heat and restarted with increased vigour. A word in his ear cured the problem overnight.
It would be interesting to discover whether guys (and girls - they pong too!) who live alone are more prone to be 'mingers' as they have nobody close to advise them of personal problems of this nature.

ZeBedie
11th Sep 2016, 20:49
If you wanted it, there was a civi equivalent of government loo roll. It was called Izal Medicated. Some weirdos actually paid money for it, in shops. But my arse deserves better.

Flight_Idle
11th Sep 2016, 20:54
I noticed a 'Self pong' come on when working in the middle east, despite showering several times a day. It took a little while to work it out, but it was due to using 'Dove soap'.

OK, it moisturises the skin, but a clinging fat does not always work in hot climates. If a pong comes on in hot climates, using 'Dove soap' ten times a day will be of no use. Medicated soap & Wrights coal tar will fix it.

Hope this may help someone, nothing worse than showering like mad, yet the pong clinging on.

denachtenmai
11th Sep 2016, 21:42
It may be a little known fact on this forum, but in the early seventies Airman's toilet paper was highly abrasive & had 'Government property' stamped on each individual sheet.
In the 50's and 60's it was shiny and caused no end of trouble in places like Sharjah, where all it did was spread the residue everywhere, especially if one had the trots.:ooh:
Normally a case of out of the trap and into the shower, but a bit difficult when down on the pan, no pun intended.;)
Regards, Den.

VP959
11th Sep 2016, 21:50
Three things always puzzled me about "Government Property" Izal:

- Who in their right mind would ever want to steal the stuff, so why bother to add an anti-theft marking?

- Given that they taught us all to wash properly, why on earth did they supply such bloody useless bog paper?

- How much extra did the MOD pay to have Izal print "Government Property", in pale grey, on every single sheet of the stuff?

FWIW, everyone I knew bought their own decent stuff and kept a roll in their locker, me included.

Pontius Navigator
11th Sep 2016, 22:13
A goon suit was a good method of trapping self-pong. Getting home after a 15 hour stint, shrugging off the grow bag, then pulling that abortion of green cotton mix shirt over your head, you got 100% undiluted BO.

Pontius Navigator
11th Sep 2016, 22:17
Regarding the shiny stuff, especially when water was in short supply, I heard the Aussies had a special technique.

Take one sheet of paper.
Fold carefully in half across short width.
Fold in half again.
Remove the corner (centre of paper)
Unfold, insert finger, clean bum
Take previously removed corner
Clean finger nail with corner.

G-CPTN
11th Sep 2016, 22:39
Though I did come into (uncomfortable) contact with 'Government Property' toilet paper, at the time (1940s/1950s) domestic toilet paper was identical (though without the printing) so the printing was seen as a deterrent for theft thereof.

'Soft' toilet paper wasn't available (even domestically) and was, presumably, more expensive than Izal/Bronco, so the MOD would have persisted with it on the grounds of cost (or they had warehouses full of the stuff).

fujii
11th Sep 2016, 22:57
The government industrial strength rolls weren't all bad. They held together well for streamer cutting.

VP959
12th Sep 2016, 09:27
I first encountered the Izal stuff in the mid-70's, when it was still standard issue in service heads, years after the soft stuff was normal in domestic use. I can't believe that MOD had that much of the stuff in stock from the 1950's, so they must have just carried on ordering it for decades afterwards. It wouldn't surprise me to find that they were paying far more for that stuff for the last decade they were buying it than everyone else was paying for the soft stuff.

IIRC, we didn't get the soft stuff in the heads until the mid to late 1980's, and at first it was only available in the officers heads, I think.

Pontius Navigator
12th Sep 2016, 09:38
VP, remember the air force was a very large organisation by peacetime standards after the Korean War and National Service ensured a high throughput :)

In 1961 I was issued black socks made in 1954. First time I pulled them on the top ribbing detached from the sock shortly after my toes went through the bottom. It was also a time when the aircrew cold weather leather gauntlet contract was let for either left or right gloves rather than a pair. No doubt some financial scrote worked out it was cheaper if only a worn glove was replaced rather than a pair.

Yes, they would have had hangars full of stuff long before 'just in time' and RAC were more than a twinkle in Gordon Brown's fathers eye.

onetrack
12th Sep 2016, 10:46
You bunch of wuss's. Real men use sandpaper.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5b5m7161dZg

VP959
12th Sep 2016, 11:02
Yes, they would have had hangars full of stuff long before 'just in time' and RAC were more than a twinkle in Gordon Brown's fathers eye.

I well remember the time they stored stuff, as my second ever car was a "brand new" 1967 registered minivan, that was 6 years old and had been stored from new in a big hangar somewhere. It had originally been destined for use by the RAF, was pale grey with roundels on when I got it. I bought it at an MOD auction, for around 1/10th of the price it cost when new. Interestingly, when buying this I discovered that it had two registration numbers, a civvy one and the service one (those plates had been removed before sale). Apparently all service vehicles are (or were) like this, and had a "shadow" civvy registration.

G-CPTN
12th Sep 2016, 11:06
Vehicles built for the MOD usually have the military 'registration' as the chassis number.

yellowtriumph
12th Sep 2016, 11:23
You lived in a council house?!!???! We dreamed of having council ouse!

That almost sounds like half a drop tank. How close to WW2 was it?
Probably bought for my elder sister so around 1950. The outer was 'dark straw' in colour and the inner was brilliant white and it definitely had a rolled lip to it around the top. I can remember it clearly as if it was yesterday, the body of it felt like cork/papier cache and was obviously waterproof.

Fareastdriver
12th Sep 2016, 13:56
I have always been fussy about my showers and have been known to check the shower on arriving at a hotel and walking out if the shower is not up to standard; especially if it has one of those abominations, an electric shower. The shower that was installed into my new abode was a standard cubicle with a wand. Come the refurbishment I removed this plus a small wall covering a void and ended up with an area 1500mmX600. The drain was rerouted to be below the floor and the ensuite converted into a wet room. The shower has a normal volume and temperature thermostatic control and the product goes to a 4 way valve; this gives you four alternatives:

A standard overhead shower with a large rose for general soaking.
A wand with a variable head for getting at the parts that gravity won't reach.
Two adjustable jets at ankle level for clearing out between toes or the soles.
Four adjustable jets; two at waist level and two at shoulder level that Zero at 400mm.. These can hit your kidneys, shoulder blades or anywhere on your back at any temperature you like for as long as you like.

It goes without saying that even at mains pressure it really wakes you up in the morning and sooths all the aches and pains.

I'm going to miss it when I die.

Pontius Navigator
12th Sep 2016, 15:55
OK, when you shower, how long do you shower for?

A wet shower can be quite quick. A soapy shower requires you get wet, get soaped, get rinsed.

So, how long as MRs PN spends for ever almost till the hot runs out - some much for a shower being more economical than a bath.

G-CPTN
12th Sep 2016, 15:58
MRs PN spends for ever almost till the hot runs out - some much for a shower being more economical than a bath.
My daughter likewise (at least as long as she lived at home with us).

fwjc
12th Sep 2016, 16:19
The issue of running out of hot water is solved with the previously maligned electric shower. I love mine. It means I only heat the hot water I need for washing.

I shower every morning for the following reasons:
1) Going to bed with wet hair leads to strange formations in the morning, and I have far better things to do with my time than fiddling about with a hairdryer.
2) I sometimes overheat at night, making a pre-bed shower pointless.
3) It's my wake-up time where I do my thinking and planning for the day.

Not showering every day leaves me feeling grumpy and grimy. I find the idea of people not washing daily to be quite unpleasant.

Fareastdriver
12th Sep 2016, 16:49
some much for a shower being more economical than a bath

It is surprising how little a shower uses. I mentioned the jungle bucket system and most were more than satisfied with two gallons of water. Women, especially Asian, are very good at blocking shower drains with loose hair and in practice they can have a long shower without the water coming much more than halfway up the shower tray.

Tankertrashnav
12th Sep 2016, 17:58
I've only ever had electric showers and have only recently discovered that they are "abominations". I'm puzzled, what's the problem with them :confused:

VP959
12th Sep 2016, 18:02
I measured our, fairly normal single shower head, shower, and the flow rate was around 11 litres per minute. I'd imagine that a bigger shower head (say, one of those large "sunflower" head units) would use considerably more water.

On average, I seem to take between 6 to 8 minutes for a shower, depending on whether I'm washing what little hair I have or not. My wife takes at least 10 minutes, often more like 15 minutes, to shower.

For us, showers use as much, probably more, water than having a bath. I've not measured our bath capacity, but am led to believe that most are around 80 to 100 litres when filled to a comfortable level.

My showers seem to use just a little less water than a bath on average (66 litre to 88 litres). My wife's showers always use more than a bath (110 to 165 litres).

The only shower we've ever had that was arguably more economical than a bath, in terms of water usage, was an electric one. It was the biggest unit available at the time, around 10 kW, but it barely managed to deliver 6 litres per minute, and was so feeble as to be pretty pathetic.

If you want to be economical, then fixing the shower to run on a timer button, rather like the showers on a submarine, would save a lot of water. Press the button once to give a minute of water to get wet, then soap up and sponge/flannel everywhere, then press the button again to get another minutes worth of water to rinse off. I only ever went on a submarine once, a trip from Faslane down to Gibraltar. Apart from the infrequent and pathetic showers, the whole trip was unpleasant, so much so that when we'd finished the task and docked at Gibraltar I opted to pay my own air fare home, rather than endure the return trip back to Faslane on the boat................

SASless
12th Sep 2016, 18:27
How long? Until the Hot Water runs out!

Far too many months of cold or ambient temp water during my younger days.

Longest stint was Eleven Months with no hot water.

So now it seems more psychological motivation than sanitary that determines how long I will stay if allowed by time or schedule.

Pontius Navigator
12th Sep 2016, 18:30
On electric showers, much depends on the knob. Friends had one that was diabolical. It was a completely smooth disc about 3 inches in diameter, no dimples, no milled edge.

Difficult to turn on, near impossible to turn off.

The other problem we found was the minimal shower so you had to race around the cubicle to get wet.

Now we have a 1.5 bar power shower which at least lest me get properly wet.

Best I had was in Yugoslavia in a pre-war hotel. The shower head was dinner plate size and at ceiling level, 12 feet up. Now THAT gave you a shower.

G-CPTN
12th Sep 2016, 18:40
I've only ever had electric showers and have only recently discovered that they are "abominations". I'm puzzled, what's the problem with them :confused:
I had one house with an electric shower.
It was only 7kW and struggled to heat the incoming cold water in winter unless the flow was turned-down to a trickle.

In summer, when satisfactory temperatures could be attained, anyone else in the house using cold water caused the shower temperature to rise suddenly - sometimes 'scalding' the occupant.

I tried every adjustment without finding satisfactory settings.

VP959
12th Sep 2016, 19:09
Our old 10 kW electric shower could just about manage to heat the incoming winter mains water (which is around 8 deg C usually) to a lukewarm shower temperature of 35 deg C (I like my shower to be at least 38 deg C, preferably around 40 to 41 deg C) at a flow rate of about 5.3 litres per minute, which is pathetic, less than most washbasin taps deliver.

In summer it managed around 6 litres per minute, just because the incoming mains water was a little bit warmer, but frankly any shower that's less than around 10 litres per minute isn't worth having, in my view, and a decent power shower at around 20 litres per minute or so is what I'd prefer.

We're lucky, we have 4 bar mains water pressure and a hot water system that works at mains pressure, so at least the barely adequate 11 litres per hour we have at the shower is delivered with enough force to make it feel reasonable.

Hempy
12th Sep 2016, 19:23
This is a pommy thing.

I shower straight out of bed every morning.

I also shower before bed/marital communications.

If I have engaged in a sweaty activity in the mean time, eg cricket/rugby training, there will be another bathing session in between.

You Poms deserve your reputation as being stinking and adverse to soap.

sitigeltfel
12th Sep 2016, 20:28
This is a pommy thing.

I shower straight out of bed every morning.

I also shower before bed/marital communications.

If I have engaged in a sweaty activity in the mean time, eg cricket/rugby training, there will be another bathing session in between.

You Poms deserve your reputation as being stinking and adverse to soap.

Talking bollix again Hempy, you really do set yourself up for a fall! Australia ranks (sic) behind the UK in the personal hygiene stakes, and way behind France.

Canada ranks in the middle of world hygiene study | Globalnews.ca (http://globalnews.ca/news/165069/canada-ranks-in-the-middle-of-world-hygiene-study/)

We can almost sense the whiff from here.

Pontius Navigator
12th Sep 2016, 22:05
My uncle had to ration water, his cattle got first dibs. Showers, in the rainey season when the water butt was full.

vapilot2004
12th Sep 2016, 22:12
As stated before, I shower regularly, however, there are those that believe this is overkill:

"Doctors say that overuse of soap removes the skin’s natural protective oils and good bacteria. This can exacerbate or cause complaints such as dermatitis. The longer one stays in the shower, the more of the skin’s oils are removed. The only real beneficiaries of over-frequent baths and showers are the companies that make and market soaps and shampoos."

I shower once a week. Here’s why you should too - The Guardian (https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/mar/08/shower-once-a-week-polluting-environment)

Windy Militant
12th Sep 2016, 23:57
I has a shower regularly, every spring and autumn whether I needs it or not ! :}


Can't believe there's been 96 posts and nobodies done the old chestnut.;)

SASless
13th Sep 2016, 00:11
Even living on a Sailboat I had my two sessions in the Rain Locker every day....granted I had either Dock Water or very lovely fresh water from the Water Maker.

There is simply no excuse for not scrubbing your scroungy self!

There is however one very good reason.

Between the Ice Maker, Water Maker, and Diesel Generator for the AirCon.....Ladies somehow were attracted to my boat named "Luna C".

The final touch was the Blender to make those Rum based slushy lime drinks!

It is amazing how a freshly scrubbed female with a full tummy of food and a double ration of Rum enjoying cool dry air can be so approachable.:ok:

Tankertrashnav
13th Sep 2016, 00:14
We certainly get acclimatised to smells. I can imagine if we were suddenly ttansported back to the 50s when weekly baths and irregular changes of clothing were the norm, we would be appalled at the smell of BO and sweaty feet, but because we were used to it then we didn't notice. Nowadays if you walk past someone with stinky pits you certainly notice it. It was the same with cigarette smells - everybody smoked so nobody noticed.

Those of you who are getting all superior about how many showers/baths you have a day- one question - do you smoke? If the answer is yes, then I am afraid you smell. When I retired, I got a job in a local filling station which sold cigarettes. As a new customer approached I could almost always tell if he/she was going to ask for cigarettes because I could smell them before they reached the counter.

So if you are a smoker it doesn't matter how many showers you have. Unless you wash/dry clean all your clothes daily (and brush your teeth between cigarettes) you smell like an ashtray!

vapilot2004
13th Sep 2016, 00:56
TTN - growing up, I recall adults were, to me, stinky. They often smelled of booze, cigarettes and perfume/cologne. As a little boy, coming into the den full of adult friends of my father, mostly military, the thick cloud of smoke created a boundary layer that hovered just over my head.

I also recall everyone's house had a characteristic odour. Nowadays, concerne l'odeur de la maison, that's no longer the case unless we take into account those obnoxious spewers of chemicals called 'air fresheners'. You want fresh air, open a window (or three) and clean once in a while.

VP959
13th Sep 2016, 08:00
TTN - growing up, I recall adults were, to me, stinky. They often smelled of booze, cigarettes and perfume/cologne. As a little boy, coming into the den full of adult friends of my father, mostly military, the thick cloud of smoke created a boundary layer that hovered just over my head.

I also recall everyone's house had a characteristic odour. Nowadays, concerne l'odeur de la maison, that's no longer the case unless we take into account those obnoxious spewers of chemicals called 'air fresheners'. You want fresh air, open a window (or three) and clean once in a while.

Houses did smell, back then, I also remember it as a small boy, especially going to stay with my Grandmother; her house had that distinctive smell that I'd now call an "old ladies smell".

Having a house with forced, 24/7, heat recovery ventilation and filtering has been a revelation in terms of freshness and air quality. I had an ozone unit for the old house, just to periodically get rid of the fug of smells that would build up, even with windows left open. The forced ventilation system keeps the house fresh even with all the windows shut.

G-CPTN
13th Sep 2016, 10:03
I also recall everyone's house had a characteristic odour.
As a very young child, I accompanied my father (the Man from the Prudential (http://www.insiderquarterly.com/return-of-the-man-from-the-pru-)) as he toured the farms collecting the insurance money.
Every house had its characteristic smell (not necessarily unpleasant) which my father seemed unable to perceive.

Pontius Navigator
13th Sep 2016, 11:20
Went to view a house near Lincoln some years back, went in stupidly drew a breath, clamped my handkerchief over my nose and said "Wots that smell". It was so atrocious that shock overcame manners in front of the lady of the house.

We left saying her leylandii hedge was too tall.

DType
13th Sep 2016, 12:16
Had a shower under a gentle but very high NZ waterfall once. The "gentle" trickle of water hit fast and v hard.
Had a hot shower al fresco high up in the Alps one night, scalp scalded and feet frozen, spectacular temperature gradient.
Until I retired, it was pre-breakfast chase the dog up the hill then shower off the sweat.
Can't chase anyone or anything now!

VP959
13th Sep 2016, 12:52
Went to view a house near Lincoln some years back, went in stupidly drew a breath, clamped my handkerchief over my nose and said "Wots that smell". It was so atrocious that shock overcame manners in front of the lady of the house.

We left saying her leylandii hedge was too tall.
We bought a house years ago that smelled badly of cigarette smoke, even after we'd had the place completely redecorated, with new carpets and curtains. We put up with the smell for a few months, but then a friend in the car trade came over and lent us the bit of kit they use to get rid of smells inside used cars.

It was a corona discharge ozone generator, with a small fan to blow the stuff around. We put it in the living room (the worst room in the house) and left it on for a couple of hours, with the door and windows closed. I have to say it worked remarkably well, and completely eliminated all the smells in that room. We went on to do the whole house with it, it was that good.

I subsequently bought some parts and made one, and we used to use it in the old house from time to time, just to get rid of lingering smells. It was particularly useful for getting rid of a burnt toast smell, where running it for ten minutes in the kitchen would completely remove any trace of the smell.

The big downside was that you had to leave the room being treated, and ideally the whole house if you were leaving it on for an hour or two in a room, as it produces dangerously high levels of ozone, which isn't good for your health. We noticed that leaving it on tended to kill all the spiders in a room, too, as we'd often find dead bodies around on the floor afterwards.

Rosevidney1
13th Sep 2016, 13:41
Arachnid murderer!

onetrack
13th Sep 2016, 14:17
An uncovered, big saucer or large dish, of full cream milk, placed into a locked room overnight, will remove a lot of smells.
Particularly useful to remove new paint smell.

Geordie_Expat
13th Sep 2016, 14:35
I have been reading this thread with some wonderment. There seems to be an undercurrent of borderline OCD with some of comments. And as for "hot water running out", is there anyone left that doesn't have a combi boiler ?


Also I have an electric shower in a wet-room that I had built due to disability and have no problems at all !

VP959
13th Sep 2016, 14:59
Loads of people out in the sticks don't have the luxury of the combi boiler as an option, unless they go for one of the pretty dreadful, non-modulating, oil things, or lay out the money for an LPG system. There are still very large swathes of the UK that's off the gas grid, so stored hot water systems are still very common.

As for electric showers, then if you're happy to have a shower with a flow rate of just 5 or 6 litres per minutes maximum, then I guess they are OK. Most people I know would find such a low flow rate inadequate for a shower, though, perhaps because once you've got used to a shower that runs at 10 to 15 litres per minute anything less feels pretty feeble.

Pontius Navigator
13th Sep 2016, 15:53
Although as VP says many in rural areas don't have gas, we do. But as in Scotland we have a warm air heating system so a combi boiler is not feasible. In Scotland it was electric, here it is gas. We have a separate gas boiler just for water. Incidentally our water system is also direct. The water we shower in has been through the boiler, there is no secondary coil in the tank.

The tank does not have the sprayed lagging and we are not on our third cyclinder; they seem to last 10 years before springing a leak..

Tankertrashnav
13th Sep 2016, 17:48
Around 2.8 million households in the UK are off the gas grid. In Cornwall the figure is around 50%, which is a bit annoying as the first house in Britain to be lit by gas was in Redruth, Cornwall, over 200 years ago Always annoys me when utility companies come up with offers which only apply if you are a dual gas/electricity consumer.

Still, as I am also not on mains water I save a lot of money as I don't have to pay the extortionate water rates which are charged in the South West, nor do I have to drink the rather unpleasant chemically treated stuff that comes out of the taps.

Ancient Mariner
13th Sep 2016, 21:08
We have a 300 liter electrical water heater for the two of us. We've never ran out of hot water. Not even when SWMBO fills her ridiculously large tub.
Per

Fareastdriver
13th Sep 2016, 21:49
The apartments in China that I lived in normally had a 50 litre hot water tank for each bathroom and a 25 litre for the kitchen. I don't know whether they could have filled a bathtub but there was never a problem with hot water for a shower.

yellowtriumph
14th Sep 2016, 10:35
We live in a brand new house on a very large development, we still have our hot water supplied via a cylinder system - albeit a modern one with direct mains pressure etc.

At our previous place, a modest flat, we had an electric thermal storage system and I have to say it was very good and appeared to be very efficient. (Google gledhill if you're interested)

larssnowpharter
14th Sep 2016, 18:40
If you marry a Filipina you will find that your ideas of sufficient bathing are completely unacceptable - they are without doubt the cleanest women in the world and will insist you bathe as often as they do.

My experience is that they insist in getting in the shower with you to make sure you do a proper job of it.

Pontius Navigator
14th Sep 2016, 19:15
Women, especially Asian, are very good at blocking shower drains with loose hair and in practice they can have a long shower without the water coming much more than halfway up the shower tray.
FED, this puzzles me. Were you there monitoring it or, as Lars said, being cleaned at the same time?

Fareastdriver
14th Sep 2016, 21:41
I plead the Fifth Amendment

Mr Optimistic
14th Sep 2016, 22:33
Do you mean regularly, as in quite often, regularly as to a set interval, or really do you mean frequently. Need more clarity.