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View Full Version : Retiring to Florida Are You?


SASless
3rd Sep 2016, 05:27
As you seek your place in the Sun....you might note that in the Sunny South of the USA, particularly in Florida, there are factors one should consider when buying a place to live.

Along with Taxes, Cost of Utilities, Water Quality, and Soil Quality....you might also consider the local Flora and Fauna.


https://scontent-lga3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/10150602_718436451541143_1740426351_n.jpg?oh=81ef54aea8c5823 42687bf6d6c52a8c8&oe=5841CA54

treadigraph
3rd Sep 2016, 06:11
Yuck! I don't know what the hell that is holding the snake, but it's put me right off my cornflakes!

Hempy
3rd Sep 2016, 06:28
That's a baby

obgraham
3rd Sep 2016, 07:00
Looks like Bret Favre to me.

Hempy
3rd Sep 2016, 07:31
https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTmCT0rcc-OtXrwoFaOtiXSWPrHjdxXCME6bIpnWPDRyoC51bta

TWT
3rd Sep 2016, 07:40
Shame that's a hoax photo Hempy :)

Hempy
3rd Sep 2016, 08:01
Do tell....

TWT
3rd Sep 2016, 08:04
Snake Catchers :: King Brown Snake Hoax Branxton (http://snakecatchers.com/Huge_King_Brown_Snake_Hoax.html)

Hempy
3rd Sep 2016, 08:07
Yep, king browns are non-venomous. Good source :ok:

Sallyann1234
3rd Sep 2016, 09:07
It seems a shame to kill such a beautiful creature.

But on the other hand you could probably make a great handbag and a matching pair of shoes out of it. :ok:

Fareastdriver
3rd Sep 2016, 09:22
Obviously the trick is to give it a can of beer and then jump on it.

SpringHeeledJack
3rd Sep 2016, 09:35
One held a 'baby' Python draped around one's shoulders many years back in Thailand. It was about 3m in length. It was shocking how strong it was when in tension, in this case man was stronger then beast, but had it been an adult then the story would have been different. Florida is nice, but the wildlife is pretty impressive in a dangerous way once you leave the groomed pastures...

India Four Two
3rd Sep 2016, 10:05
you might also consider the local Flora and Fauna.The Eastern Diamondback (Crotalus adamanteus) is the largest rattlesnake (up to 2.4 m and 15 Kg). I saw one in Florida not quite as big as the one in SASless' picture. It had just been runover and wounded by a tractor mower. The driver killed the very angry snake with a shovel!

Fareastdriver
3rd Sep 2016, 10:59
The Green Mamba sits in a tree and waits for you.

You've got thirty minutes.

ShyTorque
3rd Sep 2016, 11:28
Looks like a bearded ginger to me. Very dangerous after a beer.

charliegolf
3rd Sep 2016, 11:40
I'm off to see Mickey and Minnie next week. But I'm not worried, it seems they have crocs to deal with the snakes!

CG

VP959
3rd Sep 2016, 13:28
This reminds me of standing in the shallows at Lake Parker, FL, a few years ago, looking out for 'gators and waiting to give a friend a hand mooring, who was flying in solo from Idaho. As he shut down, climbed on to a float and chucked me a rope, his first words were "this is what I love about Florida, pretty much every critter here is out to try and eat you"...................

meadowrun
3rd Sep 2016, 13:44
Florida is a big kiddies playground compared to OZ (except for the hurricanes.)


http://www.nofrackingway.us/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/oz-down-under-.jpeg

Stanwell
3rd Sep 2016, 14:53
Snakes.
I did work for a time in outback Queensland doing mineral exploration.
That area out there is populated with, among others, four of the deadliest species in the world - all rated "Highly Venomous".

These are...
The Eastern Brown Snake - in my opinion, definitely the most dangerous because of its aggression. It often feels threatened if you even come within coo-ee of it. Regarded as the world's second most venomous land snake.

Colletts Snake - of a somewhat more stable disposition but it will strike readily and repeatedly if you don't watch what you're doing or where you're going.

The King Brown or Mulga Snake - a large snake (up to 3 metres) generally peaceful unless disturbed .. then you've got real problems.

The Inland Taipan or Fierce Snake - the most venomous land snake in the world. One bite contains enough venom to kill 100 adult men. True.
The good thing is that it's normally quite a retiring creature and, fortunately, I never saw one.


.

SASless
3rd Sep 2016, 16:43
Eastern Diamond Backs can be very large....and are quite plentiful in some places along with their many Cousins.

obgraham
3rd Sep 2016, 18:38
The Green Mamba sits in a tree and waits for you.
Heck, when I was in Africa I was told the Mambas wouldn't mess with you if you didn't mess with them.

Was that just to make me feel better?

India Four Two
3rd Sep 2016, 19:19
I was told the Mambas wouldn't mess with you if you didn't mess with them.

True of most snakes. When I lived in Australia, I read that most snake bites were the result of adults trying to kill snakes and 9 to 12 year old boys looking for them!

Flash2001
3rd Sep 2016, 19:31
Or Texas for that matter...

Taken in a retirement community about a mile from where I live.

(Credit Fort bend county Sheriff's office)

After an excellent landing etc...

Loose rivets
7th Sep 2016, 21:03
Isn't it the snake that's not supposed to be there - killing masses of other wildlife and generally being annoying?

alwayzinit
7th Sep 2016, 21:19
One has to admire the Australian talent for underplaying the ferocity and deadliness of their Fauna.
Rather than the Instant Death Snake or One nip and you are done snake, its just the Brown Snake!!
Box Jellyfish as opposed to The Extreme Pain and Paralysis Jelly!! The list goes on...........................:eek:

Fareastdriver
7th Sep 2016, 21:39
Mambas wouldn't mess with you if you didn't mess with them

That's correct for most snakes. If you are really worried about them wear hob nailed boots. They can sense you footfall through the ground and will ease themselves out of the way if they feel something heavy coming along.

mary meagher
7th Sep 2016, 21:56
In New York State long ago when I was in high school, I used to climb cliffs...the cliffs were not especially challenging and one could scramble up or down....but it did surprise me to discover about thirty deadly copperhead snakes coiled together in a sunny declevity...a warm spot, they were thinking about leaving their winter lair, but uncertain whether spring had truly arrived....
In Florida, not only rattlesnakes and cottonmouth snakes, the colourful stripes of a coral snake is a warning...highly dangerous. Lately pet snakes, pythons and the like, have been released, and seem to like living in the Everglades.

In Maryland, we once found a large copperhead snake in the open springs of a double bed. The cleaner cut it in half with a spade as it tried to escape.

fltlt
7th Sep 2016, 22:12
Southern Alberta, electric repairmen are wary when opening roadside junction boxes, rattlesnakes love the warm wiring.

RAC/OPS
8th Sep 2016, 01:12
North American copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) is different to the Australian copperhead, nevertheless the US one is described as having usually non-fatal venom, mild toxicity - I would imagine the effect on humans would depend on age, infirmity, health etc, so Mary Meagher, I'd be reluctant to call them deadly. And the one found in the bed springs was trying to escape so it was killed? Harsh!

onetrack
8th Sep 2016, 06:42
I reckon the guy in SASless's pic is just angling to git himself another couple of pair of those right fancy boots he's wearin'. :)

Hydromet
8th Sep 2016, 12:01
The Eastern Brown Snake - in my opinion, definitely the most dangerous because of its aggression. It often feels threatened if you even come within coo-ee of it. Regarded as the world's second most venomous land snake.



The King Brown or Mulga Snake - a large snake (up to 3 metres) generally peaceful unless disturbed .. then you've got real problems.

The Inland Taipan or Fierce Snake - the most venomous land snake in the world. One bite contains enough venom to kill 100 adult men. True.
The good thing is that it's normally quite a retiring creature and, fortunately, I never saw one.

I'd agree with Stanwell's assessment, although I've had little to do with the King Brown.
The Eastern Brown can be a tetchy sod, especially if the weather's a bit cool and it hasn't been able to warm up. Not unusual to get a 'dead bag' when catching them. They are venomous from the time they come out of the egg.

I don't remember it, but apparently when I was a toddler in Mt. Mulligan, mum found a taipan under the steps where I was playing. I do remember dad killing them from time to time.

Red bellied blacks are also among the most venomous - no. 5 in the world, from memory - but there are no recorded adult fatalities from them. They are pretty timid, and can do an amazing job of concealing themselves. Had to catch one once, and was almost on top of it before I could see it, even though the house owner knew exactly where it had gone. When I stepped back I fell on my backside, and my greatest fear was that it would head up my trouser leg, as they usually head for somewhere dark.

Wonderworld
8th Sep 2016, 12:28
The Red belly blacks are on the move here now it's warming up a bit during the day. Have to watch where you step!! :eek:

Hydromet
8th Sep 2016, 12:30
Same down here. Neighbour had one that shot through.

Gertrude the Wombat
8th Sep 2016, 12:47
One held a 'baby' Python draped around one's shoulders many years back in Thailand. It was about 3m in length. It was shocking how strong it was when in tension, in this case man was stronger then beast, but had it been an adult then the story would have been different. Florida is nice, but the wildlife is pretty impressive in a dangerous way once you leave the groomed pastures...
I have a friend who won't let one of her snakes get round her neck when she's alone in the house, as the snake is stronger than she is.

Yamagata ken
8th Sep 2016, 13:09
When geologising in The Pilbara, I used to wear boots and gaiters as protection against spinifex. It sort of worked (the boots yes, the gaiters not so much). I met a lot of snakes. mostly they didn't care, but hopefully the gaiters would have given me some protection.

The problem with The Pilbara is that lots of it is very steep. Scrambling up a cliff and meeting a snake eye-to-eye at face height was a worry.

onetrack
8th Sep 2016, 14:15
Nastiest piece of work you don't ever want to come across, is the Western Tiger Snake of SW Western Australia. Aggressive and dangerous and highly venomous.
They love swampy, marshy areas and they can and do climb trees.
Came across one accidentally on the front track to the farm one afternoon when I was about 8 and just wandering along after school.
It reared up fearfully and hissed, and was ready to launch a strike at me, as far as I was concerned - and I reckon I would've beaten Usain Bolt in the 200M sprint back to the house. :)