PDA

View Full Version : Beware new scam


vctenderness
30th Aug 2016, 10:18
I received a phone call today from a man with a very strong Indian accent. He claimed he was calling from the Telephone Preference Service and could stop any nuisance calls.

I listened to his spiel and then told him I was already registered and this was a nuisance call. He promptly hung up!

I guess if I carried on he would ask for a one off payment for the service however this service is free to anyone.

These scumbags are amazing at dreaming up new versions of the old scams.:=

G-CPTN
30th Aug 2016, 10:22
What amazes me is who funds these scams and where do they acquire the numbers?

(I know that 'databases' of numbers - together with names - are available, but, presumably, these have to be bought?)

TWT
30th Aug 2016, 11:25
I have no doubt the number lists can be bought quite cheaply on the internet somewhere.A look at the privacy statement for a lot of companies ( e.g. your phone telco) indicates that they reserve the right to sell your details to third parties.Once a list is available,I'm sure it would be bought and sold many times over.

B Fraser
30th Aug 2016, 11:57
I had a call from an Indian chap this morning asking about my computer. In his heavily accented English, he said that his name was Richard Smith. I told him I was Ranjit Gupta and hung up on him.


If I have a few minutes to spare, I love winding them up. I was once called from India by a chap asking about my accident. I strung him along and eventually told him I had lost a leg. He got all excited and started talking about compensation claims. I spun it out a bit more and then told him it was ripped off by a polar bear while I was on a trekking holiday in Spitzbergen.


He didn't find it as funny as I did.

VP959
30th Aug 2016, 11:58
Apart from lists being sold, many times over, there are also loads of random diallers out there, that just dial loads of numbers and when one gets a "hit" with someone answering the call gets picked up. I believe this is the reason for many of the "silent calls" people get. I very regularly (daily) get a call from a number starting 023. It's the same number every time, yet is almost always a different scammer.

Our number isn't listed and we're on the TPS, but my understanding is that the scammers can spoof their caller ID. The spoofing makes overseas calls look as if they are local to you (023 is Southampton, which is where my IP address looks like it's coming from, although we're 40 miles away). I'm guessing that spoofing calls to look as if they are local to you is another way of getting you to answer. In my case it's been easy to just ignore the call, as the idiots use the same spoofed number every time, and I have it written on a pad by the phone. I keep meaning to invest in a call blocker, but it's easy enough to just check the ID and then ignore the calls.

ExXB
30th Aug 2016, 11:59
Why would they need to buy numbers? Their machines dial numbers in sequence - doesn't cost them anything for incomplete data calls.

VP959
30th Aug 2016, 12:10
Talk about coincidence! The phone has just rung, not the usual scam 023 number, this one started 01618, but still a scammer, an "accident claims helpline".............

G-CPTN
30th Aug 2016, 12:48
What puzzles me is that I am receiving calls on my second SIM, asking for me by name.
AFAIK, the second SIM has never been registered by me.

What is stranger is that they use my 'second' name (actually my first but I only use it for official purposes).

And I never make calls on the second SIM - it's just for emergencies - and none of my family know the number.

Tech Guy
30th Aug 2016, 12:49
Over the last month I have become a victim of a clever 'Eastern European' scam whilst out shopping. Here is how the scam works:

Two very good looking girls in their twenties come over to your car as you are packing your shopping into the boot. They both start cleaning your windscreen, their breasts almost falling out of their skimpy t-shirts. When you thank them and offer them a tip, they will say no and instead ask for a lift to another supermarket, in my case Tesco.

You agree and they both get in the back seat. On the way there, they start undressing, until both are completely naked, then, when you pull over to see what is going on , one of them climbs over into the front and starts crawling all over your lap, kissing you, touching you intimately and thrusting herself against you. While you are understandably distracted, the other one steals your wallet!

I have had my wallet stolen 10 ten times already this month including twice yesterday, so please warn all the guys you know to be on the lookout for this scam. The best times seem to be just before lunch and about 4.30pm at Sainsburys

Avtrician
30th Aug 2016, 12:57
If it Helps, a case of 200 wallets can be had for $15.00 from Hong Kong free overnight delivery.:E:E:E

Sue VÍtements
30th Aug 2016, 13:19
And I never make calls on the second SIM - it's just for emergencies - and none of my family know the number.Your girlfriend must have ratted you out :E

VP959
30th Aug 2016, 13:21
What puzzles me is that I am receiving calls on my second SIM, asking for me by name.
AFAIK, the second SIM has never been registered by me.

What is stranger is that they use my 'second' name (actually my first but I only use it for official purposes).

And I never make calls on the second SIM - it's just for emergencies - and none of my family know the number.
Everything we do is now monitored and the data collected and sold, unless you go to extreme lengths to stay "off the data grid". Personal data gathering and collation is now big business and everyone is at it, more often than not with government help.

I started looking at the very tip of the data collection, collation and correlation business when I applied for a "free" electric car charge point installation. It soon transpired that it wasn't free at all, money was being made from the personal data the thing radioed back using the phone network. I only found this out as we have no mobile signal at home and the company said that in that case they couldn't fit a charge point.

A bit of very peripheral digging showed that there is a massive amount of personal data collection going on everywhere, but the real trick is the way that data is collated and correlated so that all the small, seemingly unimportant, elements are pulled together into what amounts to a comprehensive data pack on pretty much every individual.

In the case of the second SIM, if that's been put in a phone then it will have been associated with the IMEI number of that phone. The same IMEI will be associated with your normal SIM, therefore the collators have all they need to tie the two data sets together.

G-CPTN
30th Aug 2016, 13:25
In the case of the second SIM, if that's been put in a phone then it will have been associated with the IMEI number of that phone. The same IMEI will be associated with your normal SIM, therefore the collators have all they need to tie the two data sets together.

Thanks - that could answer the situation.

Other than the phone is not an 'original' but a (cheap - but excellent) ALDI one.

:confused:

Martin the Martian
30th Aug 2016, 13:58
Over the last month I have become a victim of a clever 'Eastern European' scam whilst out shopping. Here is how the scam works:

Two very good looking girls in their twenties come over to your car as you are packing your shopping into the boot. They both start cleaning your windscreen, their breasts almost falling out of their skimpy t-shirts. When you thank them and offer them a tip, they will say no and instead ask for a lift to another supermarket, in my case Tesco.

You agree and they both get in the back seat. On the way there, they start undressing, until both are completely naked, then, when you pull over to see what is going on , one of them climbs over into the front and starts crawling all over your lap, kissing you, touching you intimately and thrusting herself against you. While you are understandably distracted, the other one steals your wallet!

I have had my wallet stolen 10 ten times already this month including twice yesterday, so please warn all the guys you know to be on the lookout for this scam. The best times seem to be just before lunch and about 4.30pm at Sainsburys

Aaaannnnd... back in the room!

onetrack
30th Aug 2016, 14:11
Is anyone getting the calls where there's no-one at the other end - but after about 8 seconds, an automated soft female voice just goes ... "goooodbyyyyye". ??

I'm guessing it's automated dialling equipment designed to check if your number is viable - but we get this call several times a week on the home phone (landline).

RedhillPhil
30th Aug 2016, 14:22
Yep, I've had a few of those plus two Indian "B.T. telecom engineer here" ones.

VP959
30th Aug 2016, 14:29
Thanks - that could answer the situation.

Other than the phone is not an 'original' but a (cheap - but excellent) ALDI one.

:confused:
That doesn't matter. All phones have a unique IMEI number (as does anything that takes a SIM card and communicates with any mobile network). All the data collators need to do is tie the phone ID to a known ID on a SIM, then any other SIM used in that phone can be tied to that known ID, because it will have a link to the unique IMEI.

Sometimes this link isn't useful, for example when someone buys a second hand phone and puts a new SIM in it, but a lot of the time it is.

The same goes for connecting SIM IDs to different IMEIs, when people swap phones around. Essentially any bit of data has the possibility of being collated with other data to provide a more complete data set.

Here's a real example of the power of collating data from different sources. Around two years ago I was concerned about medical record sharing, when the NHS announced that they were making "anonymised" personal medical records available to researchers, insurers, etc (for a fee). I made an FOI enquiry and received an "anonymised" version of my medical records, with the intention being to reassure me that the data was anonymous and couldn't be connected to me. The data included every injury, illness or treatment I'd received, with the dates, but it didn't have my name or date of birth, just an "anonymous" reference, my age and gender. It didn't include any reference to the doctors or hospitals where I'd been treated, either.

I decided to see if I could just do some simple web searches to tie data together. It took me around 0 minutes to find an online record of a motor cycle accident, that gave my name and the place I was living at that time. This was easy to correlate with the date of injuries and surgery in the "anonymised" medical record, tying my name and location at that time to the record. A few more minutes and the electoral roll revealed where I was currently living, so, within around 15 minutes, using not very sophisticated methods, I had managed to make my "anonymised" medical record complete, with my full name, date of birth and current address.

It was at that point that I wrote to my local NHS Trust requesting that they not allow any of my medical records to be released to anyone, in any form, without my express consent (unlike most things, they will share, or sell on, your "anonymised" medical records unless you specifically tell them not to). My reasons for doing this were simply to stop any life insurer getting hold of the data, as they are only supposed to have information you declare to them or that they obtain from their own medical examination.

The world of "big data" is extremely useful, but also pretty damned scary when you realise that a lot of our decision makers in government haven't a clue as to how you can manipulate data to remove anonymity.

vctenderness
30th Aug 2016, 16:07
I'm really popular today! Second scam call supposedly BT Openreach. I also get dozens of the silence and just goodbye at the end calls can't figure that one out.

I am with Talktalk, at least until next week, and definitely the number of these calls has increased significantly since their hacking episode. They all use my name in full as well so reckon I had my data stolen.

racedo
30th Aug 2016, 16:27
A way to find out from where the data first originates is to tweek or change the details slightly.......


A mate started doing this 10 years ago so when he fills a form in he says his name is Jonh Smith of 10 Aciacia Drive, next time its John Smieth of 10 Aciaia Dreive and so forth with change of birthday, he knows that one form filled in 6 years ago has been source of majority of garbage calls and junk mail.

B Fraser
30th Aug 2016, 16:31
I have now had my third call today from India telling me there was a problem with my "windows computer". I asked the caller to describe to me which computer and the nature of the problem. The idiot simply repeated his poorly rehearsed script and then transferred me to his supervisor. I told the supervisor that there was nothing wrong with it. He replied "do you think you know more than a windows technician ?" I responded "I have run the operations department for a major service provider so I know about computers. Why don't you f*** off !"


I feel much better for that.


:*

ShyTorque
30th Aug 2016, 17:36
Ah yes - the usual "Hello sir, how are you today - I am from Microsoft headquarters - your computer has serious errors on it!"

"Microsoft, eh..Where are you speaking from?"

"Er...New York!"

"Really??"

"Yes, sir, these errors are very serious and so I can help you get rid of them you need to open windows!"

Long pause on my part (deliberate).

"Are you there sir, have you opened windows?"

"Yes, all except the bathroom one"

"Click".....

I now leave the answer machine on the landline phone in the daytime and monitor the message. Usually, there isn't one because they move onto some other poor sucker to try.

vulcanised
30th Aug 2016, 17:40
Would that be the same bunch who have phoned me hundreds of times and managed to get "unavajlable" to come up on caller display?

That defeats my Call Saint blocker and the anonymous ban at the telco. I have never answered them.
.

Pontius Navigator
30th Aug 2016, 18:26
VP 595, just had a 023 number.

Seems a Thomas Sanderson Blinds telemarketing campaign. We once made a mistake contacting them hence they bypass TPS.

air pig
30th Aug 2016, 22:04
For things like filling out forms for companies and the phone number is required I just give nothing, a fictitious number or for a landline the local police HQ switchboard number. I just have the sounds of silence.

Fairdealfrank
30th Aug 2016, 22:55
For things like filling out forms for companies and the phone number is required I just give nothing, a fictitious number or for a landline the local police HQ switchboard number. I just have the sounds of silence.

A good number to use is 0333-88888888.

Metro man
31st Aug 2016, 01:59
There is a device you can buy which requires the caller to enter a PIN number before the call gets connected. A bit awkward as you need to give the number to everyone, but it might be suitable for some people. Failing that, a simple answering machine to screen calls.

JWP1938
31st Aug 2016, 09:46
This is NOT an advertising post but - several months ago I wanted to update my phones anyway and was fed up with trying to stop these calls. I had considered TrueCall but this was about £100. However, early in the year I bought (through Amazon) for about £59 two walk-around phones which synced with each other and TrueCall built in. They are easy to set up so your own contacts have no problem and other calls can be dealt with automatically as you decide. Since having them I have not had even one unwanted call. If I check the call log I see many rejected calls there almost every day but they never ever get as far as the ring tone so I never know. Can't recommend them enough and well worth the money.

Sue VÍtements
31st Aug 2016, 20:03
I started (but obviously immediately stopped) perusing the Quicken Loans website and saw this Communication Consent:
By submitting your contact information you agree to our Terms of Use and our Security and Privacy Policy. You also expressly consent to having Quicken Loans, our Family of Companies, and potentiallyour mortgage partners contact you about your inquiry by text message or phone (including automatic telephone dialing system or an artificial or prerecorded voice) to the residential or cellular telephone number you have provided, even if that telephone number is on a corporate, state, or national Do Not Call Registry. You do not have to agree to receive such calls or messages as a condition of getting any services from Quicken Loans or its affiliates. By communicating with us by phone, you consent to calls being recorded and monitored.


What made me look at the site was the promise that it would be possible to buy a house with only 1% down (so the mortgage crisis of a few years ago obviously taught us nothing) but that you would then have 3% equity :confused: :confused:

How does that work ... other that your house immediately falling to one third or its previous value :hmm:

yellowtriumph
31st Aug 2016, 21:39
I had a call from an Indian chap this morning asking about my computer. In his heavily accented English, he said that his name was Richard Smith. I told him I was Ranjit Gupta and hung up on him.


If I have a few minutes to spare, I love winding them up. I was once called from India by a chap asking about my accident. I strung him along and eventually told him I had lost a leg. He got all excited and started talking about compensation claims. I spun it out a bit more and then told him it was ripped off by a polar bear while I was on a trekking holiday in Spitzbergen.


He didn't find it as funny as I did.
I love these calls, in fact I get quite excited when I get one. During my last 'accident' conversation I told them that I was more upset than anything else because the other party involved in the accident refused to give me their name and contact details and had actually spat at me!

It was some while later that I was able to tell them that the contact address must be London Zoo as the other party was a camel with no driver. They didn't see the funny side of that one one either.

Pontius Navigator
31st Aug 2016, 22:03
Had two more calls from Sanderson' s, the 023 number, today after telling them yesterday, politely to desist.

We are with Talktalk. A quick call to 14258 and Bob's yr uncle, from now on they get an engaged tone. They join American Express in fruitless calls.

4mastacker
31st Aug 2016, 22:23
We had one of those fictitious accident calls today and Mrs 4ma responded with "Yes, I've had an accident" Obviously, the caller was asking for details and Mrs 4ma replied with "About 28 years ago and she's now the mum of two beautiful boys. Good bye".

chevvron
1st Sep 2016, 07:34
I now leave the answer machine on the landline phone in the daytime and monitor the message. Usually, there isn't one because they move onto some other poor sucker to try.
Yeah we've been doing that for several years. We often get 'blanks' and 'number withheld' when we 1471, but just recently there's been a couple of short messages from a recorded voice saying 'dial 9 to speak to an operator'. Course it's still a withheld number so we can't even if we wanted to which we don't.

Pontius Navigator
1st Sep 2016, 10:24
Had two more calls from Sanderson' s, the 023 number, today after telling them yesterday, politely to desist.

We are with Talktalk. A quick call to 14258 and Bob's yr uncle, from now on they get an engaged tone. They join American Express in fruitless calls.
Bast^rds, they rang again this morning, probably after getting the engaged tone. This time they used number Withheld.

We could block it but we occasionally get genuine withheld from wife's brother and our offspring.

keyboard flier
1st Sep 2016, 13:24
I've had similar calls asking about the accident I've had. I started off by asking where they had got this information as I'd not had an accident for over 15 years.
Now, when I'm asked I say yes I have and when they ask how serious it is. I reply 'how serious to you think getting the babysitter pregnant in the back seat of the wife car is?
They don't seem to hang around after that and gradually the number of calls is lessoning, so I must be running out companies to contact me.

funfly
1st Sep 2016, 16:52
Its an interesting point that the monitoring of mobiles, whether in use or not, is part of the system that gives you your en route traffic information.
The system will detect if the phone is in motion at a speed suitabe for a car then decide its location and compare the information with what is normal for a particular road.
Its a lot more complicated than that and is combined with data from other sources but it does illustrate how you phone produces information about you even if you are not using it.
Remember that the camera can also be accesed without you being aware of it.
The problem is the so called contracts that we agree to without going through the hundreds of pages. Have you seen the Google terms, or even the iphone terms that you have no choice to agree to if you use their service.

radeng
1st Sep 2016, 16:57
I had the usual 'bank account for deceased person of the same name' the other day, but interestingly, it was a Chinese bank! Can't remember the name - probably Oo Flung Dung or similar. He only wanted 50% of £4.6million!

ShyTorque
1st Sep 2016, 17:26
Remember that the camera can also be accesed without you being aware of it.

A lovely view of the inside of my back pocket - nice!

VP959
1st Sep 2016, 18:40
Its an interesting point that the monitoring of mobiles, whether in use or not, is part of the system that gives you your en route traffic information.
The system will detect if the phone is in motion at a speed suitabe for a car then decide its location and compare the information with what is normal for a particular road.
Its a lot more complicated than that and is combined with data from other sources but it does illustrate how you phone produces information about you even if you are not using it.
Remember that the camera can also be accesed without you being aware of it.
The problem is the so called contracts that we agree to without going through the hundreds of pages. Have you seen the Google terms, or even the iphone terms that you have no choice to agree to if you use their service.
These companies, like Google, Microsoft et al, rely on the fact that very few people actually read the Ts and Cs before agreeing to accept a "service". A year or so ago I uncovered the vast amount of snooping that Google were doing via Android, and found a way out of it (there is no way of opting out - if you want to use their Play Store you have to accept being spied on). I installed a "Google-free" version of Android and just put up with having to side-load apps, rather than going direct to the Play Store. To be honest, apart from an hour or two of initial setting up time it's been no hassle, and the thing works a hell of a lot faster without all the Google (and, to be fair, other "free" data collecting apps) stuff going on in the background.

The particular Ts and Cs that make me chuckle are those for Windows 10. By installing it you give Microsoft the right to access all and any data on your machine, including emails, files etc, even if encrypted, for them to do with as they wish (and you can't turn all of it off, either, plus they turn things back on with every update, without telling you).

Pontius Navigator
1st Sep 2016, 19:42
A lovely view of the inside of my back pocket - nice!
Same deal as 'find my laptop' 'find my phone'.

If you fear big brother then disable it. If you want to recover stolen property, leave it on.

I can track my Satnav and the Satnav records where it has been. I was able to find out where my Meet and Greet car park was. I also know someone who found his garage mechanic had driven his Merc at 120 mph. Guy was dismissed instantly.

Cuts both ways.

jhannay
1st Sep 2016, 20:03
I get called from India with a " fault on my computer". When so minded I play ball and say it is not switched on and takes a while to boot. I usually keep them about 2-3 minutes then drag out their requests... pretend to type their requests but get them to tell you the proper response etc. My best is 8 minutes when he smelt a rat, asked if I had a computer, said no and was advised to go f*** my pretty little ar**. Still makes me laugh!

G-CPTN
1st Sep 2016, 20:27
For some time now I have drawn out the call (I am retired and it provided entertainment) but now I'm getting fed up with 'David' who wants to ask me lots of questions yet again about which products I have bought (they struggle when I say that I don't use television) and when I answered previously with false answers I have found myself being contacted about products and services that I have never owned.

Pontius Navigator
1st Sep 2016, 22:13
Jhannay one day I was making bread. Did the same, yes computer on etc then went through kneading etc, in the end we were talking bread making, quite amicably.

Effluent Man
2nd Sep 2016, 08:28
I've had Indian energy calls where they try to sell you electricity. I tell them that I am not connected and that everything I have works on steam. One guy even tried to start an argument about it.

Pontius Navigator
2nd Sep 2016, 12:00
Had lots of calls from the TT Technical Department - 02073832111
Used the call bar feature on the phone. Bast^rds called today, new number 02087451222.

I also block directly with Talktalk who say they will take the number down at their end.

And today Saturday the bast^rds used Unavailable so had to resort to blocking all such calls.

Impress to inflate
2nd Sep 2016, 12:18
I just get straight to the point now, I tell them in no uncertain words that I hope there kids and close relatives die of a horrible illness in a slow and painful way and in as much agony as possible.

I told my friends and they said "Thats not nice", my reply was, "How would you feel if your elderly relative had been scammed by these parasites out of 1000's of pounds/dollars" They now do the same, boll*cks to them, they are the lowest form of life !

sled dog
2nd Sep 2016, 14:10
Had a call from an Indian gentleman the other day, usual " I am from Microsoft " etc.
Bloke could hardly speak English. As I was busy at the time I just said I have a Mac ( which I do not have ) so this is a scam so bugger off. If I had had more time I would have strung him along for a while.

Pontius Navigator
2nd Sep 2016, 15:00
Impress, sadly your response will be like water off a duck's back. Mrs PN rants at them too; I would far rather play with them if I have the time - save someone else getting pissed off too.

My best play was when that small child was screaming with delight as her dad flew aerobatics. I was able to play the screams at appropriate moments during our conversation.

WhatsaLizad?
2nd Sep 2016, 16:16
Get a lot of the "Windows Tech Support" calls in FL.


I've gotten to really enjoy stringing them out with hopes of a possible payday as I act like a feeble old man wanting to fix his computer without his caregiver (who also controls the bank accounts) present.


I feel it is my civic duty to keep them on the phone and delaying their call to the the next truly feeble retired FL resident.


Last guy has a very strong Indian accent. The end of his nearly 30 minutes spent with me degenerated with me being a FBI Cyber Crimes Agent along with colorful descriptions of him, his sister and the nearest Braham bull involved in some sordid carnal act.


For you techies, what are these clowns trying to get you to do on the PC, enable remote assistance to access data for fraud or trash it so you have to pay a ransom to unlock it?
Thanks

Effluent Man
2nd Sep 2016, 16:33
A couple of times I have had this pseudo police site, once I think it was West Yorkshire And another time Cheshire police. It locks your PC and says that you have to pay a £100 fine because you have been viewing illegal material. I suppose they just hope that people who have been downloading anything dodgy will just pay. But their banner is hilarious, one I think had several spelling errors and a Rover SDI patrol car circa 1980.

radeng
2nd Sep 2016, 18:26
email today claiming to be from the internet provider - bt. I 'Had to re-register because memory was full and would stop receiving emails until re-registration was complete'. The return address was something like '[email protected]', so it is easy to see how someone unaware could get caught out.

Surprising how often Microsoft call about 'a problem with your computer'.......

Alsacienne
2nd Sep 2016, 19:11
I had the pleasure (?) of a call from a Windows computer tech support guy and told him I had a Mac. He put the phone down. 5 mins later the same person rang saying he was a Mac computer tech support guy! I called him out, had a good laugh at his expense and he called it a day ... until next time I suppose!

Have you tried answering these calls in a foreign language? This really can un-make their day!

Pontius Navigator
2nd Sep 2016, 20:11
"Russian Embassy, all calls being recorded, state name business and purpose of call."

Works a treat.

lomapaseo
2nd Sep 2016, 20:30
I feel it is my civic duty to keep them on the phone and delaying their call to the the next truly feeble retired FL resident.

Thanks a bunch:= now they call me with a piss-ant attitude:eek:

Fairdealfrank
3rd Sep 2016, 00:19
0012084668787 - looks like a USA number. Had a few calls from it appear on the display over the last few days, don't recognise it so don't answer.

Googled it, and yes, it's a nuisance call, how tedious. YAWN.

finncapt
3rd Sep 2016, 07:39
One of the advantages of living in Finland is we don't get plagued with these kind of calls!!

I can't imagine why!!

etrang
3rd Sep 2016, 09:07
calls asking about the accident I've had.

I'd tell them that i've had a serious head injury with loss of short term memory. Then keep talking and after 30 seconds ask them who they are and why they are calling.

luoto
3rd Sep 2016, 21:53
Mostly :) just domestic sellers of magazines etc who forget the Robinson list.

radeng
4th Sep 2016, 15:16
Especially for the Eastern accents, reply in broad Yorkshire - or depending where you come from, Brummie, Scouse, Geordie or Glasgow.

gemma10
4th Sep 2016, 16:28
Had a text on my phone today from 07484110735. Do not reply to it. Malware.

Pontius Navigator
4th Sep 2016, 17:37
Gemma, I never reply to random texts. Also when we get a BT Voice Mailw alert - bin
I get a regular text from the Halifax on my mobile telling me to top up my account as it is getting near the limit. The balance remaining text to text often increases. Must try and withdraw it some day.

G-CPTN
6th Sep 2016, 14:34
Just had an automated call from 'HMRC' alleging that I am being prosecuted (http://www.unknownphone.com/search.php?num=02033229050) - press 1 to speak to my personal case officer (http://who-called.co.uk/Number/02033229050).

As if . . .

Seriously, this is a scam which could catch many 'uninformed' people - apparently official, potentially serious, just press 1 to resolve it . . .

Ron Manager
6th Sep 2016, 22:42
My favourite recent payback story against these scammers: https://blog.kwiatkowski.fr/?q=en/tech-support