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Sue VÍtements
26th Aug 2016, 01:42
Seeing as how there JetBlast represents such a wide variety of experiences: age, place of residence, employment history ... even sometimes aviation content :eek: I realised there was one thing I'd not heard about which is of course anyone being in prison. Understandable you might say, but you don't have to have been nicked, you could have been an hofficer there, or maybe the beak fined you a fiver for knocking off plod's helmet on Boat Race night.

Anyone?

Anyone get close?


oh, and I've been fortunate enough to not have had the experience. :ok:

lomapaseo
26th Aug 2016, 01:56
Anyone get close?


I'm not even sure that the body has been found as yet best just to not think about it

Sue VÍtements
26th Aug 2016, 02:00
Should be pretty easy to get rid of it in Florida!


I read story about a guy who wanted to dump a body in the Everglades, so he took the pax seat and door out of a Cessna, stuffed the body into a bog cooler that he'd greased up with the idea of flying out somewhere remote, tipping up the cooler and letting gravity (and the aligators) do the rest. He got nicked though when someone saw him fooling with the aircraft on the ramp.

Hydromet
26th Aug 2016, 02:13
Visited the police cells in Bougainville to bail out one of the staff, and it didn't look like a place I'd like to spend the night. OTOH, whenever I drove past the proper gaol there, the inmates all seemed to be out playing football.

onetrack
26th Aug 2016, 03:17
Closest I've been is an interrogation room, when a lying b****** tried to accuse me of something I hadn't done.
Took all of half an hour to sort out the truth, when his story failed to stand up to scrutiny.
From what I've seen of lockups (from the outside), it's not something I'd fancy happening to me.
I've known some people (not closely) who did serve time. The reasons were mostly associated with unnecessary violence and sexual transgressions - which I would think probably comprise the largest proportion of reasons for going inside.

Hempy
26th Aug 2016, 03:18
I did a tour of HM Pentridge about 6 months after they moved all the crims out. Nothing had been moved or cleaned, all the cell doors were open and you could just wander about all the divisions at your leisure, including the notorious H Division. Was a bit of an eyeopener, especially reading the graffiti in the cells.

Anilv
26th Aug 2016, 04:19
In my part of the world... if you're going to do something naughty- don't wear underwear.

When they lock you up, you're left with only your underwear. But if you're going 'commando' then they let you keep you pants!

Not that i have had personal experience of this of course...:\

Anil

Sir Niall Dementia
26th Aug 2016, 04:53
9 days in a nick in Eritrea. NOT something I ever want to repeat. Eaten alive by insects, praying for consular/UN intervention. I probably wouldn't have minded so much if I'd actually done anything wrong.

My employers got it all sorted, but I left with malaria, and 17lb lighter. I'd love to lose that 17lb now.........................Maybe using a different method!

Visited a mate in Wormwood Scrubs who spent 3 years there before his conviction was quashed. I used to go once a month. I have never seen a man more terrified than he was in the first 6-7 months.

A friend who is a prison officer told me that in the nick he works in many inmates are there for offences which are often committed by mistake, people who perhaps never realised they had committed a crime until the plod came knocking. He would love to see tougher sentencing for the real bad guys (he'd like to see all drug dealers get life, meaning life without any hope of release) and more practical sentencing for the guy in the street who makes a genuine mistake and then pays the price.

Prison; a place I'd definately do my best to avoid:ok:

SND

NorthernChappie
26th Aug 2016, 05:13
Sort of. Had to visit the town police station in a country town way up sticks in Uganda where the tourists don't go (a long story) to give statement about something. Place doubled as the local jail. Didn't help that the visit was late at night. Resolved there and then never to be naughty in Uganda. Cells didn't seem to have even a facilities bucket judging by what was oozing from under the bars.

PLovett
26th Aug 2016, 05:25
When I worked as a lawyer I visited several clients who were detained. Most were on remand but occasionally, one was doing time. These visits were either in the interview rooms/area but occasionally in the suburban police cells the interview had to be conducted through the bars of the common area where the client was in with other prisoners. So much for client legal privilege. You were required to stand behind a line about a metre from the bars.

As a law student we were shown through the state prison (now closed) where we went through an empty division (cell block) and shown over the workshop area and hospital wing. I recommend a visit for those who reckon prison is too comfortable these days. It will make you change your mind.

Ascend Charlie
26th Aug 2016, 05:39
I spent a night in the Police lockup in Lightning Ridge.

But only because I was flying a police aircraft, arrived too late to get a room in the (full) motel, so slept in a cell. Door open. Fortunately it was a new station and very clean, unlike the usual suspects who got locked up there - this is an opal mining town, full of people who never want to be seen by authorities and who often live underground.

Ancient Mariner
26th Aug 2016, 05:42
Only in USA, Mexico, Brazil and a few times in Norway.
I was a bit wild in my youth. :E
Now a model citizen.
I miss them old days.:(
Per

ORAC
26th Aug 2016, 06:07
I did the tour of Alcatraz back in the 1980s, close as I've come. Never been in court either. Sheltered life.

vapilot2004
26th Aug 2016, 06:20
Been in a regional county jail. It was under construction at the time and I went on a walkabout just so I could say I had been there. I suppose there are more fun ways to land oneself in the gray bar hotel.

Super VC-10
26th Aug 2016, 06:30
I've been to Beaumaris Prison, Anglesey. Now preserved as a museum complete with treadwheel! :}

G-CPTN
26th Aug 2016, 06:46
I believe that there is an infamous PPRuNer that Danny managed to get locked up.

longer ron
26th Aug 2016, 06:48
In the early 70's I was 'volunteered' to escort one of our 'sooties' to the regional detention centre at RAF Wyton - probably because I was one of the few ground crew with a road licence (F1629B) on our sqn at that time
Bob's crime ? - he had been caught LOL (he wasn't very bright !)
Anyway gets to Wyton and carries in one of Bob's bags to be greeted with the shout ''don't carry the prisoners bag'' - OK 'Staff' says I - happy in the knowledge that as a J/T I probably got paid more than him :)
'Staff' says to Bob ''This way'' to which Bob replies 'Ok Mate' - and as I escaped I thought how much Bob was going to enjoy his holiday :)

bcgallacher
26th Aug 2016, 07:02
In 1986 I spent a night in a religious police cell and another in a police cell after getting caught up in someone else's problem. Before I was released it was highly unpleasant,especially the interrogation by the religious maniacs as it became a little physical. Left me with a deep and abiding hatred of all things Saudi Arabian.

Effluent Man
26th Aug 2016, 07:25
Went into Blundeston in Suffolk. They had a few high profile inmates including a Kray. My offence : I was goalie in the local college football team and we played a match v cons. It was a bit porridge esque. The screws watching all cheered when one of our team made a hard tackle on a safe breaker and at the end one con tried to negotiate a shirt swap which was intended for him to leave with our team.

sitigeltfel
26th Aug 2016, 08:28
Never been inside a prison but have twice been up in front of a Sheriff, defending and pursuing small claims cases, both won. :ok:

I will be at Blackfriars next June for the retirement party of a Judge who is a good friend and have been promised a tour of its deepest recesses where the public don't ever see. :ooh:

This feature wall in our garden has an unusual gate. It is an old prison door from Lyon jail, circa 1800s. It could probably tell a few tales!

http://i231.photobucket.com/albums/ee201/sitigeltfel/20160826_093546_zpsh59c5swz.jpg (http://s231.photobucket.com/user/sitigeltfel/media/20160826_093546_zpsh59c5swz.jpg.html)

ChrisJ800
26th Aug 2016, 08:35
Ive done the tourist tour of Alcatraz, does that count?

troppo
26th Aug 2016, 09:02
got arrested and charged on a (bum) assault charge one sunday afternoon. i graciously declined the offer of accommodation for the night before court the next day. when told the accommodation wasn't optional, i issued just about every insult under the sun as i walked out the door. see you tomorrow i said. appear in court the next day, judge rips the prosecution a new one and throws the case out as 'a highly questionable abuse of power and process'
i got given a wide berth by the finest in blue after that.

Peter-RB
26th Aug 2016, 09:32
During a Rugby tour of the Irish Republic in the mid 1990's we were asked if we would like to visit the Jail where the IRA were held before execution , it was an eerie experience ..beside the fact that many more prisoners were held in that foreboding place..but it is most famous for those executions of the main members who took part in the uprising...in historic terms not that long ago ..!

oxenos
26th Aug 2016, 09:35
"a (bum) assault charge "

Care to re-phrase that?

TowerDog
26th Aug 2016, 09:52
Yes, spent 6 days in the brig, as in a millitary jail.

While in booth camp I decided to take a day off. Just did not show up in the morning. Goofed off instead.
Thought I had gotten away with murder, then 3-4 weeks later I got called out, chewed out and sentenced to jail. :hmm:

Wasn't too traumatic. Norway probably has the best jails on the planet, brigs included.

Ancient Mariner
26th Aug 2016, 09:56
Norway is certainly better than Brazil and Mexico, but the cage I got locked up in Fort Lauderdale was not exactly Hilton, breakfast was good though. :ok:
Per

keyboard flier
26th Aug 2016, 10:19
Was a keen diver in my younger days and one of the officers of the sub-aqua club arranged an afternoon in Nottingham Prison for the inmates to have a go (suck it and see session!!) in the prison pool.
Nervy experience and was happier under the water where I had the advantage of experience.

Captivep
26th Aug 2016, 10:50
Visited two in the course of work (Bristol and an open prison in Gloucestershire) - both of them made me very glad never to have been a naughty enough boy to be a guest therein!

On the other hand, I've thoroughly enjoyed being a guest in the old Oxford prison - now a lovely Malmaison hotel...

Hydromet
26th Aug 2016, 11:15
The WW II cells at Old Holsworthy had some good graffiti. They were used as the armoury when I was there in the late '60s, and should have been heritage listed, but someone decided to paint over the graffiti.

NRU74
26th Aug 2016, 11:48
Was at HMP Moorland only yesterday. It's located adjacent to HMP Lindholme, both are on the former RAF Lindholme. Each cell has a flat screen TV and a phone. Recreational area in each 'House Block' has a couple of Pool tables. The guy I went to see had had three months added to his release date as he'd been found with alcohol in his cell and a mobile phone in his pocket ( both items are, unsurprisingly, forbidden). With three meals a day, no work, opportunity to do educational courses, beautiful flower beds etc it must be quite a good spot for a 'holiday'.

rotornut
26th Aug 2016, 11:49
I took a tour of the old Don Jail in Toronto after it was closed. The cells were tiny and crude. Not a nice place at all.

Rossian
26th Aug 2016, 11:51
.....I was arrested for vagrancy at 1AM in Almelo and spent the night in the cell.
In the morning I was sent up the road to a cafe where I was right royally fed (no charge, which was good as I had no money!) and when I went back to the nick the bobby gave me my passport and pointed to the rather pissed off looking driver and said "This man will take you out of Holland"

I was only 18 and very naive.

The Ancient Mariner

DType
26th Aug 2016, 11:59
I'm in and out of Saughton prison quite frequently, but only to take the Sunday services (sorry about that, but you did ask for the full PPRUNE spectrum).
Male and female services are separate, and the "lead in" stories are changed according to the sex of the audience. It is fascinating to see the reactions of those who appreciate a good motoring and/or mountaineering tale - always leading to the Gospel!!!

UpaCreak
26th Aug 2016, 12:15
Had make a couple of visits to Rampton Jail in the course of my work. Needed to take my car in, car was searched quite comprehensively, but needed to take some small tools, couple of screwdrivers, side cutters, DVM, and current source. These were listed and checked. Had to leave everything else in a locker, including CD cases, as they could be used as sharp objects. Escorted everywhere, and escort stayed with me all the time.
On leaving the site, car was searched again, and CO2 monitor placed in the car to check for any one hiding in it. Also tools checked out against the list given on entry.

cattletruck
26th Aug 2016, 12:35
I used to cop a lot of verbal abuse from a jealous Albanian immigrant in my village who would like to start rumours that I liked it up the bum.

Then one day Interpol arrived on his doorstep asking about a serious car crash that had occurred in Italy seven years earlier of which he had fled the scene. Soon after our pretty boy was sent to jail for seven months in a Greek prison.

One of the reasons I believe in Karma.

ian16th
26th Aug 2016, 13:03
Was at HMP Moorland only yesterday. It's located adjacent to HMP Lindholme, both are on the former RAF Lindholme. Each cell has a flat screen TV and a phone. Recreational area in each 'House Block' has a couple of Pool tables. The guy I went to see had had three months added to his release date as he'd been found with alcohol in his cell and a mobile phone in his pocket ( both items are, unsurprisingly, forbidden). With three meals a day, no work, opportunity to do educational courses, beautiful flower beds etc it must be quite a good spot for a 'holiday'. Sound much pleasanter than when I was one of twenty to a barrack room, there in 1954-56.

Mind you I could go out to the Robin Hood at night :ok:

pzu
26th Aug 2016, 13:31
First visit was as part of 3 man escort (Grizzly little S/Sgt + self & oppo) for a scroat who had done the NAAFI one armed bandit - he'd been on fire picket, sleeping in the NAAFI and was surprised when they arrested him as he tried to spend his ill gotten gains over the bar (a load of sixpences)
Collected him from the Guardroom and off to the station with him clipped to framework in the back of the L/rover. Train to Waterloo, tube to Liverpool St then train to Colchester
In Colchester had to double everywhere till we handed him over, then to the Cookhouse - great scran, and headed for the train (whilst there noticed a gardening detail cutting grass with nail scissors!!!)
Back on train the S/Sgt asked for the clips - what clips!!! Apparently we'd been travelling without them!!!
Fortunately the L/rover driver - a mate of the S/Sgt had them and no more said!!!

Second trip, again 3 man escort this time the miscreant was the first AWOL from our unit since the end of National Service and apparently when being returned to barracks prior to his CM had tried to do a 'one under' on Waterloo Station, fortunately the escort was a very large Taff who managed to heave him back on the platform
Obviously on this trip he was permantly clipped to two of us!!!

In Freeport, Bahamas (about 1974) had to visit the CID lock up to reclaim my car battery that some miscreant had pinched, as the CID lock up was close to the refinery this guy had been held there - definetly not a pleasant place, cells about the size of a standard Loo, the walls decorated with ancient FBI posters, and as this this was just post independence, the CID were Barbadian as opposed to Bahamian and not very pleasant to the locals!!!

PZU - Out of Africa (Retired)

Bern Oulli
26th Aug 2016, 15:03
Visited a couple of prisons and a YOI (Youth Offender Institution) during my time on the Bench including our one and only floating prison of the day, HMP Weare. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HM_Prison_Weare)
Interesting chats to staff and "customers", and (we stayed for lunch) the food was not bad at all cosidering the limited budget. Wouldn't want to stay the night though!

Ancient Observer
26th Aug 2016, 17:05
No.

And it is not on my bucket list.

Seen a few police cells, though, when I was younger and fitter. That was quite enough. The police seemed to me to be quite OK, except a couple who policed a certain football ground, who decided I was their excuse for an early finish. I knew they were police, because they lied every time they opened their mouths.
They were a complete disgrace. Their mates should have put them away.

Sue VÍtements
26th Aug 2016, 17:10
are you sure they weren't airline executives?

SASless
26th Aug 2016, 17:17
Floating Prisons....seems a very British concept.

Is that due to a fear of Prisoners tunneling out or something?

We prefer Islands....like that one out in San Francisco.

No one tunneled out of that one either.

tremblerman
26th Aug 2016, 17:32
Yes, I worked in Styal prison for a short while and have no desire whatsoever to go back in any capacity.

11Fan
26th Aug 2016, 17:33
Not yet, but when the Statute of Limitations expire in two years, I can tell you about it.



;)

Gertrude the Wombat
26th Aug 2016, 17:49
The reasons were mostly associated with unnecessary violence and sexual transgressions - which I would think probably comprise the largest proportion of reasons for going inside.
I think the main reasons here are stealing in order to able to buy drugs, or mental illness, or, quite often, both.

Rwy in Sight
26th Aug 2016, 18:02
I spent about an hour in the "Imprisoned Graves" adjustment to the Nicosia prison. For those (few) not familiar with that part of Cyprus history here is an interesting link that provides some explanation:
Notabilia - People - Cyprus - Grigoris Afksendiou (1928-1957) (http://www.johnpap.net/not-en/proKypros/GrhgorhsAyjentioy.htm)
I had to go through the visitor's routine of storing my mobiles and my watch on a locker but I did not visit the main part of the prison complex.

MadsDad
26th Aug 2016, 18:28
Long time back I was in lodgings, during the week, in Wakefield with a devout catholic. I used to get back there on Sunday evening at about the same time as the evening service finished so I went out for a pint or two with my landlord and the junior priest (about the same age as us, mid-20s).

The thing was the priest was chaplain at Wakefield prison so on several occasions he took us into the staff bar there for a drink. Very strange set-up - we weren't anywhere near the prisoners but everything was plain brick and barred gates. Bit spooky really. (And the 'signing in' procedure was rather more strict than your average working-mans club).

Cazalet33
26th Aug 2016, 19:28
Saudi Arabia, twice; Egypt; Iran; and Nigeria, twice. Fort Liquordale, very nearly.

The first time in Nigeria was trivial, but uncomfortable. Driving from the Shell Industrial Area in Port Harcourt to Kidney Island I was stopped by a policeman on points duty at a crossroads. The charge was that I failed to use my indicators. I was going straight ahead, I pointed out. You should have used both indicators, he said crossly. Foolishly I was not carrying any money. Normal procedure is to slip the guy a couple of Naira and you're on your way. Second mistake I made was not to simply drive off and go back to IA and fetch another car. Whisked off to the local nick and thrown in the single large overcrowded cell. I'd told the office that I'd be going home after Kidney Island, so my absence wasn't noticed. Not until I was noted to be absent from the sundowner routine at the RA bar that chums had the wit to visit the local copshops with a handful of dosh. Six or eight hours of very acute discomfort in a dark and sweaty and stinky cell with forty or fifty locals all pleading with me to write legal letters for them. As sole representative of my race they somehow presumed that I know something about such matters (I don't).

Second time was much more serious. I'd been tasked with establishing a semi-permanent helipad in the bush a few miles SouthEast of Ekulama and setting up a navaid beacon nearby. I left a quarter ton of equipment in the care of the local Ijaw head honcho and went back to PH. Following day I returned to find what you might call 'strange fruit' hanging from a nearby tall mangrove tree. During the night a thief from a neighbouring Yoruba village had been caught trying pinch a genny and some lead-acid batteries from my stash. The Ijaw immediately hanged him. The Yorubas complained to the NPF (cops) and a few days later I was arrested as an accessory to murder. The charge was actually more serious than that, it was "instigator" of murder. It took about a week to sort that one out. Fortunately my most senior Nigerian boss was the eldest son of a very high status family within the most respected clan in the Yoruba tribe. He sorted the thing out in the customary fashion and I was free to go.

In Egypt I was driving some 212 spares from Cairo to Ras Shukier. There was one of the sporadic scares that the Israelis were going to attack, so I got hauled over at an army checkpoint and thrown into a small military prison in Zafarana just in case I was some kind of agent or scout for the bad guys. It was the tenth anniversary of an Israeli attack against Zafarana and when Nasser heard the news on that occasion he had suffered a serious heart attack. He fired the top brass of the army, the navy and the air force. On the anniversary I was just in the wrong place at the wrong time for a very jittery army. It took three days to sort that one out. Fortunately I had a couple of cartons of cigarettes and plenty of local currency, so I was able to buy water and food and toiletries and even some Stella beer. Sole occupant of the tiny jail which was intended for conscript defaulters.

The Gulf escapades were during my time as a geodesist/surveyor. First time was a simple lack of the right paperwork for operating in a restricted area. Two nights in solitary in a cell in a Beau Geste type fort at Manifa as a 'guest' of the Saudi coastguard. Easily, if slowly, sorted out by Aramco. My captors were very gracious and insisted that I share their dinner with them each evening. They were Bedou and their culture of hospitality is very strong, even towards a prisoner.

The second one was much more serious. Aboard a vessel in Saudi waters when a snap inspection discovered a still in the engine room. Very serious matter. The Captain and the Chief Engineer and I (as Chief Surveyor on the Survey boat I was held jointly liable) were thrown into Dhahran jail and given a quick trial. They each got 12 months in solitary and 80 lashes. I, as a supernumary who had not signed the ship's Articles and had only been aboard for a couple of days, was treated leniently. One month, no lashes, first week in solitary then in a more social arrangement. Made friends with a guy who was the wayward son of the Governor of Hasa (Eastern Province). His dad had thrown him in jail to give him some time to forget about his penchant for red-haired and blonde Gulf Air hosties and good malt whiskies. He and I are still good friends to this day. We still have such interests in common!

Iran was a different thing. It was at the height of the Iran/Iraq war. I was working for an American company providing survey services for a Dutch company which was building catenary anchor leg mooring buoys at Ganaveh to disperse the loading points of export tankers and reduce the risk of direct hits by the quite efficient Iraqi air force bombers. I was aboard a Dubai-registered work vessel a mile off Ganaveh when we got a call from NIOC instructing us to proceed to a point a few miles the other side of Kharg Island and search the seabed for the wreckage of an Iraqi bomber which had been shot down and to prepare proposals for recovery of the wreckage. Approaching the locus in <10k vis we were surprised to find the pilot bobbing around in his dinghy. We hauled him aboard, intending to take him to Kharg immediately as a prize. The Brit skipper and I immediately changed our minds when we found he was Belgian. We all three (four, I suppose, though he wasn't saying much) knew that if we handed him over to the Iranians they'd put his balls in a vice as an opening gambit in the conversation. We knew his chances of survival were nil. The bosun had been ordered to deflate the liferaft and stuff it into the forepeak so it couldn't be seen by any Iranian helicopters who might come for a chufti . The skipper and I agreed that the best thing to do with the poor bugger was to scoot over to Kuwaiti territorial waters and toss him and his reflated liferaft overboard. In those days (1986) the Kuwaitis and Iraqis were best mates.

When we got back to station we were asked where the hell we'd been. The authorities ashore smelled a rat and our rather thin cover story of doing baseline crossing calibrations of the hyperbolic radio nav system wasn't entirely convincing. He and I were thrown in jail in Ganaveh and subsequently transferred to Bushire for interrogation. We both stuck to our story. Meanwhile the ship wasn't able to work and this was holding up a multi-million dollar project which was vital for the Iranian economy and war effort. We were released into the custody of NIOC and nothing more was said. Iranian prisons weren't much fun. Better than Nigeria, but not as clean as the one in Dharhan.

The first line of this lengthy post makes me look like a career criminal, a serial offender. Actually only one of those encounters with bars of the round kind involved an actual crime. Rendering material assistance to an enemy combatant in a war zone is a crime in any country. The potential sentence for that crime in that part of the world in the middle of a war in which each side lost a million men doesn't bear thinking about, so a few days of discomfort in a couple of Iranian jails was a fair price to pay for not having a lifetime of guilt for handing a man over to a gruesome death.

I found that having spent twelve years at boarding school greatly attenuated the perceived discomforts of grotty victuals and uncomfortable bedding in prisons. I also found that I wasn't in the least bit intimidated by the inevitable bullies in the PH and Bushire prisons.

Democritus
26th Aug 2016, 19:28
I visited Folsom State Prison back in 1978. Scary place. Ten years too late to see Johnny Cash there......

bJ4IIhlUqrc

Ancient Mariner
26th Aug 2016, 19:37
Great stories Cazalet! My lock ups were much more mundane, for a merchant navy sailor. :E
Per

Sue VÍtements
26th Aug 2016, 19:54
Separated at birth?


http://www.johnpap.net/proImages/GrhgorhsAyjentioy.jpg

Freddy Mercury



https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQ9CLw3emlwmPIRxbE_pqHILHsTASaA2GPoI1ei92s meelllaHb

Grhgorhs Ayjentioy

air pig
26th Aug 2016, 20:50
I was asked to accompany a detective to the main Bridewell in Liverpool, which as well being the police main lock up, it was also the holding place for the Magistrates court on Dale Street. Going inside it sounded just like the start of Porridge staring Ronnie Barker, door slamming and keys turning. they let me out as I was a volunteer for an identity parade, but a scary place all the same.

On a military theme, a friend escorted someone to MCTC from Germany, arrived but forgot to take the handcuffs of the prisoner before booking him in, next thing they heard way a scream of 'you double'. That included carrying their kit as well.

mary meagher
26th Aug 2016, 20:54
Cazalet 33, you have led a worthy and adventurous life! Especially that you saved that pilot's life....you were in the clink for the right reason.

I felt I was in prison for the right reason, opposing the Vietnam war. Together with 10 other demonstrators and Father Corrigan, and my 12 year old son Martin in Oakland California, we stood arm in arm in the draft board doorway and prevented the ladies who worked there from entering, deliberately courting arrest. The California State police obliged, we did not resist. We were politely escorted to transport, and then to the clink, where men went one way, women the other, and my son had his own private cell, and spent the rest of the morning tapping out morse code on the wall between us.
We were photographed, fingerprinted, and released without bail and set for trial in a few weeks time. All of us pleaded guilty, without knowing what our sentence would be. Turned out to be 5 days and nights in Santa Rita Reformation Center.

It was an eye opening experience that I recommended ever since to all my lawyer friends. There is no substitute for being locked up. Can't help wondering how you would get out in case of fire. Otherwise, a lot like boarding school.... I did enjoy meeting the other criminals, not part of my demonstration at all, but ordinary drunks, prostitutes, and a murderer who taught me how to play knockdown whist.

All were proud to show me the pictures that Joan Baez had pasted on the cell walls when she had stayed there earlier!

My son was released in my custody! and was only required to visit the probation officer, who came round his desk to shake his hand and said he was proud to meet such a public spirited lad!

The only thing was last meal of the day at 4 pm, I soon learned to smuggle in a couple of rolls for evening snack. A demented prisoner in another cell kept screaming all night "I WANT A CIGARETTE! which made it hard to sleep. And they checked that we were in bed every hour at night.
No sheets, just a nasty mattress and a single blanket.
Also, they took my shoes and clothing away, had some sort of baggy outfit, but because my underpants (knickers) were of an ample matronly style, was permitted to keep them! If they had been the latest sexy style these days, I would have ended up with no underwear at all!

The men who took part in the demo suffered abuse from other inmates. Ended up with bruises and black eyes.

piperboy84
26th Aug 2016, 23:44
My company won a large contract to upgrade the voice and data networks and guard alarm systems at all 32 of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitations facilities ( San Quentin, Folsom, Pelicsn Bay etc.) the project lasted 5 years and I visited each facility many times and spent many weeks "inside" working throughout the prisons unguarded.

The place was hell on earth, an extremely violent, disease infested, perverted, racist, hell hole full of complete scum with no redeeming social qualities whatsoever and that's both the inmates and the guards.

A rather funny thing happened upon winning the contract, I had to assign a customer service rep to visit each prison to gather configuration info the only one available was my sister in law. I called her and asked how her current project at a Marriott resort in Hawaii was going. She said she had been there for 3 months and the Marriott had assigned her a room to live in at the hotel for the duration of the soon to finish project, she explained her room was a suite with an ocean view and she was treated just like a guest with laundry , room service and turn down service every night. She inquired excitedly as to her next assignment, I didn't have the heart to tell her until she left Hawaii and got back to the office in LA, I merely said its residential facility similar in scale to where she was but I wouldnt expect any mints on the pillow at bedtime if I were her.

She was apprehensive for the first few days "inside" but really enjoyed the governor giving her a personal tour of the death chamber at San Quentin.

One messed up place.

lomapaseo
26th Aug 2016, 23:54
She was apprehensive for first few days "inside" but really enjoyed the governor giving her a personal tour of the death chamber at San Quentin.


Wow !! every one should have that on their end-of-life bucket list

TowerDog
27th Aug 2016, 01:32
Great story Cazalet.
You should be buying lotto tickets, your lucky star may still be burning bright.
Mary and Piperboy as well: Great tales about real lives.

I did bad stuff I the Middle East 24 years ago and would still be locked up if caught.
Note to self: Do not get drunk and cut wires to nearby mosque speakers just to sleep all day.
And don't do it repeatedly, especially after the locals placed armed guards around the mosque.
And especially don't run down to the mosque, storm in and tell the mullah to shut the f... Up as you are trying to sleep.
I would still be in jail, but ran pretty fast back then and did not get caught.

SASless
27th Aug 2016, 02:34
The place was hell on earth, an extremely violent, disease infested, perverted, racist, hell hole full of complete scum with no redeeming social qualities whatsoever and that's both the inmates and the guards.


I kinda thought the same of my time in the Army.:E

parabellum
27th Aug 2016, 04:42
Similar to two or three above. Escort to a SUS (Soldier Under Sentence) going to the Military Corrective Training Centre (MCTC) Colchester. Train, taxi across London, train to Colchester all without incident. Met at Colchester station, bus to the Centre.


Directed to a long, low building with highly polished floor and wait at the end, behind a couple of desks, at which sat the senior 'Staff', around the room the SUS had to lay out their kit whilst being 'encouraged' by the more junior staff. Complete kit check ensues, as a check has to be completed before they leave their unit and any deficiencies made up, this is a formality but a harrowing experience for the participants.
When completed we are given the OK to leave by the senior warrant officer present and we were out of the door and into the transport to the station as fast as our legs would take us! It was intended that we would tell the folks back home what we had seen, it worked!

onetrack
27th Aug 2016, 05:47
I spent a night in the Police lockup in Lightning Ridge.

But only because I was flying a police aircraft, arrived too late to get a room in the (full) motel, so slept in a cell. Door open. Fortunately it was a new station and very clean, unlike the usual suspects who got locked up there - this is an opal mining town, full of people who never want to be seen by authorities and who often live underground.My father told me you could get a bed in an unoccupied cell during the Great Depression era, if you were effectively destitute, and had nothing for lodgings. Not sure how that worked out, it must have been a "position of last resort".

Now I come to think it, I'm living in the biggest British penal institution in the world! It's called Australia! :)

As my dear old (Scottish) Mum used to say when confronted with the "convict ancestry" approach - "I came here on Assisted Passage, not Insisted Passage". :)

AtomKraft
27th Aug 2016, 07:16
Spent the odd weekend in the Clink during my days in the Army. But then again, it's easy to become an offender there.....

I remember trying to 'escape' on our way to the jail in Minden with my old chum Steve Wattam.

The words, " The Army Air Corps' on the piss again" are ringing in my ears as I type.

What fun we had!:ooh:

Pontius Navigator
27th Aug 2016, 09:43
Been to Lincoln Prison, the one in the Castle. Ideal for stopping extremists indoctrinating others. All in solitary, led one by one to the chapel, each chained in a high sided cubicle facing forward so they can see the preacher.

Only those beyond redemption and condemned to death get to sit in the front row and able to converse with their fellows.

Should bring that back for some prisoners.

tezzer
27th Aug 2016, 12:42
Yes, quite a few, mainly in Asia, Thailand, Malaysia Phillipines installing technical equipment. Takes some organizing taking power tools, ladders and the like in, oddly items the authorities are a little nervous about.
Most daunting was Bangkwang, the infamous "Bangkok Hilton" worked a few weeks in there, but some, especially in Malaysia were quite nice, others less so. Always nice to know that in a few hours, you'd be back in the hotel sipping a cold one, or a G&T unlike the poor sods in there for a minimum of 15 years, unless they were executed or murdered before. Sobering.

Rosevidney1
27th Aug 2016, 12:44
It makes me wonder how much the prison system actually costs the nation - and how many innocent people are incarcerated bearing that there are plenty of villains running about the Great Unwashed Public.

vulcanised
27th Aug 2016, 16:42
Seems to me that one of the main objectives of the prison service is to keep the inmates entertained.

Add on the cost of food and heating and you have an answer on costs, which are quite outrageous.
.

ex_matelot
27th Aug 2016, 17:34
You should be buying lotto tickets, your lucky star may still be burning bright.
Mary and Piperboy as well: Great tales about real lives.

I did bad stuff I the Middle East 24 years ago and would still be locked up if caught.
Note to self: Do not get drunk and cut wires to nearby mosque speakers just to sleep all day.
And don't do it repeatedly, especially after the locals placed armed guards around the mosque.
And especially don't run down to the mosque, storm in and tell the mullah to shut the f... Up as you are trying to sleep.
I would still be in jail, but ran pretty fast back then and did not get caught.
TowerDog is offline

You big internet liar you!
Pants 'O Flame.

piperboy84
27th Aug 2016, 19:52
Another story from our California prisons job, when the engineering crew arrived they had to go thru a familiarisation class given by one of the warders which involved, things like no mobile phones past the gate , no wearing denims etc. They then had to sign an acknowledgement that if they were taken hostage the prison would be under no obligation to make special allowances or favours in order to secure their release. After the meeting one of the employees a Yorkshire native approached me looking rather perturbed, I assumed he'd gotten scared and was going to request removal from the project. Instead the tight fisted bastard in all earnestness asked would he be eligible for time and a half if any hostage situation run later than 5 and also double time if it lasted into the weekend! I actually think this calculating bastard was hoping for a riot and being taken hostage.

ian16th
27th Aug 2016, 20:56
After the meeting one of the employees a Yorkshire native approached me looking rather perturbed, I assumed he'd gotten scared and was going to request removal from the project. Instead the tight fisted bastard in all earnestness asked would he be eligible for time and a half if any hostage situation run later than 5 and also double time if it lasted into the weekend! I actually think this calculating bastard was hoping for a riot and being taken hostage. I see absolutely nothing wrong in him clarifying his terms of employment, for an assignment that I'm sure was not 'business as usual'.

But then I'm another stubborn, tightfisted Yorkshireman with short arms & deep pockets.

Shannon volmet
27th Aug 2016, 21:26
Reading this thread has convinced me that I need to get out more!😀

Rob Courtney
27th Aug 2016, 21:31
Been into Liverpool Walton to look at some renovation work on one of the wings in 93. Not sure what I expected but it was really grim and just like what you see in the documentaries.
One thing, it did convince me never to be a resident if I could help it :eek:

dublinamg
28th Aug 2016, 07:28
Got a 6 month sentence when I was 19. Got sent to St Patricks Institution – which is the Young Offenders part of Mountjoy – the main prison in Dublin. They say that Young Offenders are worse than adult prisons as there are so many young lads trying to show how tough and hard they are and trying to make a name for themselves and I’d agree with that. I wasn’t a serious criminal or anything but one drunken night got into a fight and assaulted someone pretty bad so I ended up in there. Was a tough place and there were other lads in there who were pretty messed up. The kind of people you wouldn’t want anything to do it with in the real world but others who were sound enough. I just tried to get on with everybody and avoid trouble and just get the time done.

I came from a good family who never had to deal with anybody being in prison so it was tough on them and I felt so bad about that. I had my 20th birthday in there. I still remember that day I got sentenced in court and being put in a holding cell, being scared shitless but trying to act tough. Some of the other lads who’d been there before winding me up and giving me a hard time. I remember being put in a tiny cubicle cell in handcuffs in the sweat box and the journey to prison and trying not to cry. Then having to be searched, all my personal stuff being taken away and getting my prison clothes and prison issue kit. The first week is the worst when you don’t know what the routine is or if you can trust people and trying to fit in but you get used to it quick enough.

After being in prison you appreciate your freedom so much more and being in control of what you do. Prison is very boring and routine and every day seems the same. Just being able to go outside to the yard and feel the sun or having a visit can make your day. I was lucky my family stuck by me but I lost my then girlfriend and a few mates over it. You know who your real friends are when you are inside.

The worse thing about it though is that even when you get out you have a serious criminal record that can mess up your life especially for jobs and travel. I had planned on joining the Army but got turned down for that because of my record. I grew up near the airport and was always interested in flying and aviation and dreamt of being a pilot but had to give up on that too.

That was nearly 12 years ago and lucky I haven’t been back in prison since. I’ve had a few run ins with the law but nothing serious. I last got arrested 3years ago when I was on a stag weekend in Bristol for drunk and disorderly and spent a night in the cells there. Have to say the police there were real nice to me and it was the cleanest cell I’d ever been in and even got breakfast there before making it back to the hotel where I was staying.

lomapaseo
28th Aug 2016, 13:00
the thread title is a bit limiting on this board as it asks the subject in past tense.

Some of us might still be serving with free internet and no worries :E

parabellum
29th Aug 2016, 09:24
all my personal stuff being taken away and getting my prison clothes and prison issue kit. The first week is the worst when you don’t know what the routine is or if you can trust people and trying to fit in but you get used to it quick enough.


Sounds exactly like my first three months in the Army!

oldpax
29th Aug 2016, 09:34
Steamer point in Aden ,spent one night in the mil prison for being caught out of bounds!!!Slept well as full of beer!!Lots of loud noise in the morning as the real inmates were roused and went about their business.

57mm
29th Aug 2016, 13:16
Does 5 months in the Coastel at Stanley count?

dublinamg
29th Aug 2016, 22:54
Sounds exactly like my first three months in the Army!
Suppose you are right - I couldn't join the Army so will take your word for it!

Metro man
30th Aug 2016, 00:11
Tour of Freemantle Prison in Western Australia, conducted by old school former prison officers. An insight into what "hard time" meant before today's political correctness. These guys wouldn't have been addressing the inmates as mister.

JFW
9th Sep 2016, 14:15
My job involves visiting prisons (England and Wales) every few weeks. Have access to all areas of the prison, escorted by a prison governor or officer. Was being shown around a fairly old prison and my escort pointed out the old 'death row' and execution chamber. I noted that they now seemed to use the area for office space, was told yes, now used for the 'safer custody' team. Seemed apt.

Anyone wanting sight of a prison in the London are can book a table at The Clink restaurant in HMP Brixton. Restaurant is staffed by inmates as work experience. Need to pre-book and go through security procedures on arrival but I am told the food is very good. Believe you have to eat with plastic cutlery though.

G-CPTN
9th Sep 2016, 15:05
Believe you have to eat with plastic cutlery though.
How do they prepare the food for cooking? - or do they stick to new potatoes, baby carrots and mange toutes?

KenV
9th Sep 2016, 17:22
Never been to prison. But I once shot a man and was in holding and questioned for some time. It was very unpleasant. I was subsequently released and no charges were filed. I was later asked to testify against the man I shot and his partners.

Sue VÍtements
9th Sep 2016, 18:03
? I thought you were a vicar or something ... or is that another Ken?

Chronus
9th Sep 2016, 19:11
Never been to prison. But I once shot a man and was in holding and questioned for some time. It was very unpleasant. I was subsequently released and no charges were filed. I was later asked to testify against the man I shot and his partners.
Sorry Sir Mr Ken V Sir, don`t mean any disrespect, but could I ask if it was unpleasant for you also to shoot the bloke and how come you managed to miss his partners.

rusty sparrow
9th Sep 2016, 20:30
Johnny Cash comes to mind: 'Always be a good boy, don't ever play with guns.
But I shot a man in Reno just to watch him die'

Bet there's an interesting story behind that incident Kev V.

KenV
9th Sep 2016, 20:37
Sorry Sir Mr Ken V Sir, don`t mean any disrespect, but could I ask if it was unpleasant for you also to shoot the bloke and how come you managed to miss his partners.
Yes, I did not want to shoot him and doing so was very unpleasant. As for your other question, three men tried to rob me at knife point. I brandished a gun with the intent to scare them off and stop the robbery. Two departed. One (more drunk than the other two) decided I was bluffing. In a sense I was bluffing because I really did want to shoot him. I just wanted them to leave and get myself out of there. When he continued his advance I fired one shot into (technically, through) his upper torso. He collapsed to the ground. His two partners ran back to the scene and I held them at gunpoint until the police arrived. Fortunately for me, the two partners were sufficiently drunk and shaken that they told the police what actually happened. Their account plus the account of three eyewitnesses corroborated my account and I was not charged. Self defense. I never had to actually testify against them. They made a plea agreement just before trial. I learned they were oil field roughnecks who had just gotten paid and were celebrating when on a whim they decided to rob me. I never learned what became of them. But I understand that the shot I fired entered the right shoulder and upon exiting essentially shattered the shoulder blade. He recovered but would probably have difficulty with that shoulder the remainder of his life.

KenV
9th Sep 2016, 20:40
? I thought you were a vicar or something ... or is that another Ken? A vicar? No. I never attended divinity school and graduated from the US Naval Academy. I completed flight school and flew Scooters (A-4 Skyhawk), P-3, and F/A-18 before leaving USN. I now work for Boeing as an engineer. However, I am a student of Judeo-Christian scripture and have contributed to various religious threads on this forum.

Rosevidney1
9th Sep 2016, 21:01
Ken V

Have you read 'Jesus the Man' by Barbara Thiering? If so I'd be pleased to hear your opinion.

insty66
9th Sep 2016, 21:12
Not prison but a night in Donny cop shop during the miners strike because I was d&d...

That's what the 12 in the van said, I thought I was hailing a taxi:}

KenV
9th Sep 2016, 21:14
Have you read 'Jesus the Man' by Barbara Thiering? If so I'd be pleased to hear your opinion. I have. I found it interesting, but very far fetched, especially her theory of how he survived crucifixion. Other controversial parts I can believe, like him having a wife. I have very little confidence in Pesharim and believe it has many similarities to various conspiracy theorist methodologies.

racedo
10th Sep 2016, 20:55
Yup

When at school we had 2 occasions where head asked for "volumteers" for a Sunday visit to go into a Young Offendors Institute to play football against them.

It was a bit daunting first time but was ok and seemed a good idea.

Remember mate asking what someone was in for and was car theft / burglary as drugs not the major issue then as is now.
Remember one lad said "thanks for coming as you the only school who even replied"................ his mate quick as a flash said "well that means school is definitely off burglary list forever".
We asked after when we had tea / sandwiches what he said and we just said it.

Month later played them again and guy with comment said "while he hates someone snitching what we did with his comment got him off on a fight charge from that morning as Govenor had found it funny as well".

Pinky the pilot
11th Sep 2016, 07:50
No; But I was once driven to the Pub whilst seated in the back of the 'Paddy wagon!':ooh:

A long ago and true story!