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HeartyMeatballs
25th Aug 2016, 16:38
Tesco to remove saltire flag from Scottish grown produce and replace them with the union flag.

This was in response to English customers complaining that their produce is listed generically as British and that it is unfair, hoping for Tesco to extend the same courtesy to English customers by recognising their right to a national identity. Just like they do for Welsh and Scottish customers.

However Tesco have simply removed all flags and replaced them with a generic British one with the country listed.

I can kind of see why as English flagged product would probably not sell outside of England as people would boycott them. As all I see if Scottish flags when I go shopping I very much doubt English customers boycott Scottish products in a way that scots customer would with English products. In Wales someone tweeted 'why is English milk being sold in Wales', despite Welsh milk featuring strongly in Tesco stores in south west England.

Thoughts? I think it's all or nothing. Either fairly recognise each country's right to its own identity or treat all the same. It's grossly unfair that English produce don't get their country of origin shown in the same way that Welsh or Scottish products are.

I remember the fuss that was made when Tunnocks advertised a product as 'great British snack' despite its Scottish heritage causing a huge backlash. However a vast majority of English products have to be labelled as British so why is it different in this case?

G-CPTN
25th Aug 2016, 16:45
Shouldn't it be 'Product of the European Union' - at least until Great Britain actually leaves?

HeartyMeatballs
25th Aug 2016, 16:58
It seems that Sainsbury and LIDL (the company who 'proudly serves Scotland' but doesn't have any pride in serving England) also show Scottish flags on Scottish produce but Union flags on English ones. In Scotland their store signage sign says 'proudly serving Scotland' or 'Scotland we're with you' (what on earth does that even mean - it has a very political connotations for what is a cheap and cheerful German discounter). In England we get 'freshly baked throughout the day' on our sign!

yellowtriumph
25th Aug 2016, 17:02
But the English do themselves no favours by singing the UK National anthem as 'their' anthem at some major sporting events.

HeartyMeatballs
25th Aug 2016, 17:08
There was some talk of changing that a while back. I don't know what happened. I expect it fizzled out a you say they sing the UK national anthem.

piperboy84
25th Aug 2016, 17:27
I wouldn't get to worked up about whether its a Welsh, Scottish, English or Union Jack flag on my pound of mince. I just give thanks it ain't a swastika or EU flag, both close run contests.

vulcanised
25th Aug 2016, 17:29
Just something else for folk to get neurotic about.
.

HeartyMeatballs
25th Aug 2016, 17:51
Wetherspoons at it too. Get a breakfast in England and it's a 'traditional breakfast' or 'British breakfast'. Go to Scotland and it's a 'Scottish breakfast'. Yes they're all slightly different but why do the English have to do with British and not English. A 'full English' is not available but a Scottish breakfast is available north of the border.

Tankertrashnav
25th Aug 2016, 17:53
Is the Welsh flag that dragon thingy? I know they didn't get included in the Union Jack, so I guess it must be ;)

Meatballs - we get Cornish breakfasts down here, and I believe they have an "Ulster Fry" in N.I. I think you're wrong about British breakfasts - "the full English" is still alive and well as far as I can tell. In any case they're all pretty much the same thing - a heart attack on a plate! I'm more of a poached egg on toast man these days.

Abraham Zapruder
25th Aug 2016, 17:58
Problem solved surely...

http://us.123rf.com/450wm/kursatunsal/kursatunsal1412/kursatunsal141200049/35053145-carte-de-l-angleterre-illustration.jpg?ver=6

G-CPTN
25th Aug 2016, 18:09
I worked for a Danish company, who addressed goods sent to Wales as 'Wales, England'.

meadowrun
25th Aug 2016, 18:14
The bacon I like best comes from Wales.
Don't give a toss what flag it might have.
Actually, sliced then and there and gets taken back to Abingdon in waxed brown paper.
No further though. Bloody Customs people.

HeartyMeatballs
25th Aug 2016, 18:22
Agreed. But what a delicious way to bring on a coronary.

Krystal n chips
25th Aug 2016, 18:23
" and I believe they have an "Ulster Fry" in N.I. I think you're wrong about British breakfasts - "the full English" is still alive and well as far as I can tell. In any case they're all pretty much the same thing - a heart attack on a plate

Erm, yes, they do have the infamous...:ok: "Ulster Fry" and it is indeed a heart attack on a plate......and it has to be said, it's a very convivial way of having one....if you so wished that is. ;)

As for nationality, it's no different in sport. When a sportsperson from N.I / Scotland or Wales, starts to rise to prominence, then the meedja will invariably start describing them as.....British, which is true of course, but ultimately takes away their national identity in the eyes of the public.....notably the English.

Makes you wonder who, and where, the complaints arose from re Tesco however.....probably a bunch of tossers in London, the South East and the Home counties.....we're a lot more open minded Norf of the M25.....:E

yellowtriumph
25th Aug 2016, 21:55
I've just had a look at a pack of seriously strong mature cheddar cheese 'Made in Scotland' and bought by me in my local Waitrose in Hampshire.


I see on the label that it is indeed made in Stranraer, Scotland ,and that it is made with 'British milk'. So what is it? Scottish or British?

Sallyann1234
25th Aug 2016, 22:36
Abraham
Whoever drew that map should be told that Manchester is not situated adjacent to the Scottish border.

Tankertrashnav
25th Aug 2016, 22:45
Indeed Sallyann. When I was a lad growing up in Carlisle we regarded Manchester and Liverpool as being somewhere "down South".

Now of course, living in West Cornwall I regard Bristol as being somewhere "up North"!

HeartyMeatballs
25th Aug 2016, 22:46
Yellowtriumph - I wouldn't be surprised if it was English milk. If it was Scottish milk then surely they would have labelled it. But because it's from the 'ones we don't speak of' it is labelled as British.

Cazalet33
25th Aug 2016, 22:59
Whoever drew that map should be told that Manchester is not situated adjacent to the Scottish border.

And Glasgow isn't North of Oban.

And Edinburg(sic) is in Texas, not Fife.

Peter-RB
26th Aug 2016, 11:19
Most of the Flags removed from around here in Lancashire ..are taken by Gypsies:=:=:=

HeartyMeatballs
26th Aug 2016, 11:39
Morrisons Cafe at it too. In Scotland, the menu has several Scottish flags and you're served a 'Scottish Breakfast' or a 'Scotsman'. In England you're served a 'Traditional Brekfast'.

Scotland menu: (http://your.morrisons.com/Documents/cafe%20menus/MM367576_684179_Cafe_Lectern_Reduced_Scottish_v2.pdf) Five Scottish flags on the menu and several references to Scotland or Scottish.

England menu: (http://your.morrisons.com/Documents/cafe%20menus/new_30_04_2012/MM371920_4450962_Cafe_Lectern_Reduced_English.pdf) Not one England flag. Not one mention of England or English.

HeartyMeatballs
26th Aug 2016, 12:04
AlDI - lots of Scottish branded products and in Scotland a 'best of Scotland' range. Apart from English Breakfast teabags, no mention of English produce. Given how flat and extensive the east of England is surely a good proportion of the produce will be English but are referred to a British.

You know I thought when I read this story I thought it was a little petty. But having looked into it I must say they do have a very valid point.

Why are the English not entitled to an identity when it comes to food productions?

wiggy
26th Aug 2016, 12:50
Why are the English not entitled to an identity when it comes to food productions?

...No idea but if there is a problem it looks like it's down to the UK supermarkets and the quest by some in the Uk to be ultra PC. Go into many French supermarkets and you will find the likes of "Creme anglaise" and "English Chutney".

http://offers.kd2.org/fr/fr/aldi/pkBi/

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cr%C3%A8me_anglaise

Menu anglais - 1 - Recettes de Menu anglais. (http://cuisine.notrefamille.com/recettes-cuisine/menu-anglais-18196-u.html)

Martin the Martian
26th Aug 2016, 16:01
Never mind food production. The English haven't an identity when it comes to regional government either, unless I've missed an English Assembly somewhere. Still, at least we have those Scots, Welsh and Northern Irish MPs making decisions for us.

yellowtriumph
26th Aug 2016, 17:33
HeartyMeatballs, how can those be 'proper' Scottish breakfasts if there is no black pudding!

MadsDad
26th Aug 2016, 19:15
yellowtriumph, I am led to believe that the difference between a Scottish and an English breakfast is that the English Breakfast contains Black Pudding and a Scottish Breakfast uses White Pudding*.

(* White Pudding = a slab of fried fat, without even the minimal nutrient contents of Black Pudding).

SARF
27th Aug 2016, 11:37
There are no English flags because the English don't give a crap if it's from Scotland Wales or either bit of Ireland... They assume it's close to a uk or Irish standard , fry it and eat it...
Our slightly more insecure Scottish cousins may prefer a flag on their processed dead pigs to give them that warm Mel Gibson feeling...
I'm sure the marketing bods at lidl and aldi have it all figured out

charliegolf
27th Aug 2016, 12:22
Don't give a toss what flag it might have.

Spot on Meadowrun.

sitigeltfel
27th Aug 2016, 15:12
yellowtriumph, I am led to believe that the difference between a Scottish and an English breakfast is that the English Breakfast contains Black Pudding and a Scottish Breakfast uses White Pudding*.

(* White Pudding = a slab of fried fat, without even the minimal nutrient contents of Black Pudding).

Rubbish! White pudding is mostly cereal and eaten with chips after a pub visit, not breakfast (except Glasgow where both events can coincide).

And for your information, some of the best black pud comes from Stornoway. I get friends to bring some when they visit as the local stuff is just mush, with no body to it. :yuk:

yellowtriumph
27th Aug 2016, 15:16
yellowtriumph, I am led to believe that the difference between a Scottish and an English breakfast is that the English Breakfast contains Black Pudding and a Scottish Breakfast uses White Pudding*.

(* White Pudding = a slab of fried fat, without even the minimal nutrient contents of Black Pudding).
Every Scottish breakfast I have had in Scotland has always featured black pudding. I have not heard of white pudding, but I guess it's up to the individual retailer.

rab-k
27th Aug 2016, 22:02
Lorne (square/flat) sausage, Ayrshire (round) bacon, tattie scones, sliced Stornoway black pudding, fried clootie dumpling or fruit pudding slices, grilled mushrooms and tomatoes, fried bread, a scoop of haggis, brown sauce, washed down with milky, sweet tea. Heaven... And, with or without a Saltire, the best hangover cure invented.

treadigraph
27th Aug 2016, 22:08
If you are down in Cornwall, Hog's Pudding is a worthy addition to your breakfast fry up... :ok:

Fairdealfrank
27th Aug 2016, 23:42
None of this nonsense in the 20th century, it was never an issue then.

Looks like one of the unintended consequences of devolution, just like the platforms created for the SNP and PC. The former took full advantage of the "gift" from Tony Blair, the latter did not.

As for sport, we appear to do better when organised on a UK basis (olympics) than when organised on an individual constituent country basis (football, rugby, etc.).

Just an observation, is it co-incidence? Draw your own conclusions.

sitigeltfel
17th Jul 2017, 16:15
After the furore from the Scot Nats when Tunnocks removed the saltire flag from their products, the company has announced it is putting the Union flag on its packaging to appeal to the Asian overseas market. They are also to be branded British, not Scottish.

Stand by for wailing of Chanters and rattling of Claymores!

Sallyann1234
17th Jul 2017, 16:32
Best Scottish food I ever had was a freshly made haggis from a butcher in St.Andrews.

The Nip
17th Jul 2017, 16:35
Rubbish! White pudding is mostly cereal and eaten with chips after a pub visit, not breakfast (except Glasgow where both events can coincide).

And for your information, some of the best black pud comes from Stornoway. I get friends to bring some when they visit as the local stuff is just mush, with no body to it. :yuk:

Sorry,. The best come from Bury. Fried, steamed or raw with a pint.

charliegolf
17th Jul 2017, 16:38
Shouldn't it be 'Product of the European Union' - at least until Great Britain actually leaves?

Welsh lamb has never been labelled as such...

CG

Pontius Navigator
17th Jul 2017, 16:56
I go shopping I very much doubt English customers boycott Scottish products in a way that scots customer would with English products.

Not so, Nottingham raspberries rather than Ayrshire ones. Mind you, our Coop pulled a flanker - Nottingham 250g or 2 and Ayrshire 170g. Oddly the Ayrshire ones didn't sell before the Nottingham ones.

The flanker? They have repackaged Nottinghams at 170g or a whopping price rise of about 50%. Now to boycott!

radeng
17th Jul 2017, 17:07
I have never understood how 'Cheddar' became a generic term - Canadian Cheddar, Irish Cheddar etc while Stilton has to come from limited geographical area. A number or other regional cheeses come from where the title originates. I suspect there isn't much cheese made round Cheddar these days.....

KelvinD
17th Jul 2017, 17:39
radeng: I did hear an explanation many years ago of how an appeal for protected status for the name was refused. Trouble is, I can't remember what it was! I believe it went along the lines of it has been out there for so long it would be a bit of a bolting the stable door after Dobbin legged it.
Some years ago, my sister lived in the heart of God's country (Cheshire) and her neighbour was a cheese factory, producing Cheshire cheese. I couldn't help noticing how many tankers went to and fro from this factory and all with German registrations. It seems they only needed to move so much milk stuff as feedstock, containing the local Cheshire cheese rennet/whey or what ever it is they use to make the cheese from this factory to Germany. It could be incorporated into cheese in Germany and, believe it or not, return to the same factory as Cheshire cheese in a much larger quantity and sold in Cheshire as Cheshire cheese!

G-CPTN
17th Jul 2017, 20:18
We were in Caerphilly.
Opposite the castle was a cheese shop (actually 'diary products').
"Have you got any Caerphilly cheese?"
"Never heard of it . . ."

charliegolf
17th Jul 2017, 20:44
"Have you got any Caerphilly cheese?"
"Never heard of it . . ."

What accent were you projecting,Boyo?

(More likely, you pronounced the name properly and they were flummoxed!)

CG

ORAC
17th Jul 2017, 20:49
Tunnock’s adds Union flag to wrappers to appeal to the Japanese (https://www.thecourier.co.uk/fp/news/politics/scottish-politics/470713/tunnocks-adds-union-flag-to-wrappers-to-appeal-to-the-japanese/)

G-CPTN
17th Jul 2017, 20:57
Looks like the 'cheese' shop is now a charity shop:-
Caerphilly 'cheese' shop opposite the Castle (https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@51.576259,-3.2177349,3a,75y,90h,83.25t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1soXNyZLgMfbVUXfTvR7EmGQ!2e0!7i13312!8i665 6).
It was a long long time ago (45 years at a guess).

radeng
17th Jul 2017, 22:38
I didn't know they had a cheese shop in the Science Museum....


Sorry! Wrong Caerphilly Castle! Not 4073....

reynoldsno1
18th Jul 2017, 01:59
What happens if your Scotch Eggs are made in Somerset ...?

https://www.ocado.com/productImages/946/94624011_0_640x640.jpg?identifier=7011636cc5a2a5710deab85db8 3b9ff7

Metro man
18th Jul 2017, 03:10
Unfortunately the George Cross could be seen as a right wing racist symbol and minorities could be offended by displaying it on products. Whilst it's perfectly alright to fund Islamic terrorism by paying for halal certification, people might think they were funding the National Front or English Defence League if they bought items displaying the flag.

eal401
18th Jul 2017, 08:29
If food in Tesco is displaying a British flag, I'd be grateful. Given the volume of products they have, particularly sandwiches, where the chicken comes from Thailand. :eek:

feueraxt
18th Jul 2017, 09:47
Having met many people from the Great Britain over the years, I have often observed that English people may identify themselves as either English or British, and describe their country of origin as either England, Britain or the UK.

Welsh and Scottish people, on the other hand, will invariably identify themselves as such, or describe themselves as being "from Wales" or "from Scotland", with no reference to Britain or the UK.

My take is that as they are the historical conquerors of their neighbors, the English are much more comfortable with use of the inclusive terms "Great Britain" and "United Kingdom", and the use of the Union Jack. I can understand residents of the conquered lands being less comfortable with relevant terminology being shoved in their faces.

Piltdown Man
18th Jul 2017, 10:12
Reynolds - were they Scotch or Scot's eggs. There is a difference in the eyes of a pedant. Overall, what I find refreshing is that there is a group of people who spot hypocracy and corporate PR bullcrap. Keep it up chaps.

PM

BizJetJock
18th Jul 2017, 10:56
Feueraxt
I am quite happy being British and Scottish, as are most of the other Scots I know. When talking to Americans I don't even press the point of not being English...
However, what will upset Scots is if you start saying things along the lines of the English having conquered Scotland. They invaded many times and occupied fairly large parts for periods, but history records that the two countries were united when the reigning King of Scotland was invited to take the throne of England as well. Of course the union of Parliaments was distinctly more messy, but what do you expect with politicians involved.

sitigeltfel
18th Jul 2017, 11:23
What happens if your Scotch Eggs are made in Somerset ...?


The French use the word "Scotch" as a generic name for adhesive tape.

G-CPTN
18th Jul 2017, 11:48
ScotchTape (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scotch_Tape).

Meanwhile in Oz:-
http://www.advertisingarchives.co.uk/preview/50556/1/Magazine-Advert/Durex-Tape-Sellotape/1950s.jpg

Pontius Navigator
18th Jul 2017, 14:10
I would admit that a Welsh or Scottish flag may be a disincentive too buying. I chose English butter partly on cost grounds as I don't want to pay a premium on French.

As for Spanish strawberries, I avoid them like the plague.