PDA

View Full Version : Houston, we have a problem!


piperboy84
24th Aug 2016, 23:28
If mission control in Houston managed to receive Armstrong's "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind" crystal clear radio transmission from a quarter million miles away on the moon almost 50 years ago, why can't those pricks at British Telecom hook me up with a wifi box that works in every room in the house?

SASless
25th Aug 2016, 00:08
Must be you are not paying enough TV Tax!

meadowrun
25th Aug 2016, 00:25
Actually, that could have been an alternate title for the new Tom Hanks film.


"La Guardia, we have a problem".

Hempy
25th Aug 2016, 00:36
You can get an amplifier for your router.

Sallyann1234
25th Aug 2016, 08:10
WiFi routers are inherently limited in range due to their specified power; the environment they operate in (walls and other blocking objects); and interference from other devices in the vicinity - including neighbouring properties.

No basic device handed out by any service provider is guaranteed to cover every room in a house, although some routers are a little better than others.

I've had to do some work to get reliable coverage through the house, garage and garden.

You can find plenty of advice on the web to help you get round most of the problems.

ORAC
25th Aug 2016, 08:17
The problem isn't/wasn't the Tx - the ones on Voyager and the probes around Jupiter and Saturn put out less power than your router, it's the sensitivity and size of your receiver......

http://i.stack.imgur.com/M3Oej.png

NutLoose
25th Aug 2016, 08:52
18 best Powerline adapters 2016 UK - Test Centre - PC Advisor (http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/test-centre/network-wifi/18-best-powerline-adapters-2016-uk-3490638/)

:)

Curious Pax
25th Aug 2016, 08:52
Fickle thing technology. When I'm in Cornwall there are a lot of phone reception black holes, however when on holiday in Kenya on safari recently in the middle of the bush, no problem!!

Sallyann1234
25th Aug 2016, 09:12
the ones on Voyager and the probes around Jupiter and Saturn put out less power than your router
But they operate at a very much lower data rate than the WiFi router, due to that pesky Shannon guy. :cool:

Carry0nLuggage
25th Aug 2016, 09:15
CP: One of those black holes is right next to the site of Marconi's wireless experiments to ships and the other side of the Atlantic. :hmm:

Sallyann1234
25th Aug 2016, 09:35
Those Cornish gaps and many others are due to be filled, as EE/BT expand their cellular coverage to take over the emergency services' communications. There will be hundreds of new 4g sites.

le Pingouin
25th Aug 2016, 09:46
And I don't think NASA had to contend with walls or floors so the clear message is to get the sledgehammer and chainsaw out. Can't beat clear line-of-sight :}

Tankertrashnav
25th Aug 2016, 14:54
Sitting in my office in my Cornish farmhouse with its 3' thick granite walls I've got no mobile phone signal from my nearest O2 mast, but I can get it if I move into the sitting room next door.

SASless - your dig about "TV Tax" is off the mark as you don't need a TV licence to have a wifi service in the UK (as I'm sure you knew). However paying it does enable us to have access to some very good TV uninterrupted by the constant commercial breaks which you have inflicted on you in the US.

MG23
25th Aug 2016, 16:28
However paying it does enable us to have access to some very good TV uninterrupted by the constant commercial breaks which you have inflicted on you in the US.Netflix is cheaper than the TV tax, has no ads, and has shows that aren't politically correct.

Back on topic, all you really need to do is attach an antenna the size of NASA's to your wi-fi and it will work fine.

Tankertrashnav
25th Aug 2016, 17:02
My daughter has netflix. When we were staying with her she said we could watch a film if we wanted. After trawling through dozens of American films, most of which I had never heard of we ended up watching a couple of old episodes of Dinner Ladies - a BBC sitcom!

They were excellent :ok:

John Marsh
25th Aug 2016, 18:28
Re. powerline adaptors: unfortunately, there's a downside to these. They transmit interference on short wave radio frequencies, thus disrupting reception for listeners and radio amateurs.

Really, they should be illegal. As they aren't, it's up to the individual consumer to decide whether to install any.

Relevant legislative changes are possible:
The telecoms regulator has started a new consultation that proposes to expand the remit of its existing wireless telegraphy legislation in order to tackle electronic devices that create “undue interference“, which among other things could target consumers that make use of bad Powerline Adapters (HomePlug) for their home computer networks.Ofcom Propose to Prosecute Owners of Bad Powerline Network Adapters - ISPreview UK (http://www.ispreview.co.uk/index.php/2015/01/ofcom-propose-prosecute-owners-bad-powerline-network-adapters.html)

andytug
25th Aug 2016, 19:01
It may be you need more than one router/access point to get decent coverage throughout the house. Also gives more wireless bandwidth as a single g class router often gives you less bandwidth than what comes down the wire, if you're on fibre especially. A second selling point, you put the kids on router/AP2 and can disconnect or time bar them without affecting your own access.

Gertrude the Wombat
25th Aug 2016, 19:57
If mission control in Houston managed to receive Armstrong's "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind" crystal clear radio transmission from a quarter million miles away on the moon almost 50 years ago, why can't those pricks at British Telecom hook me up with a wifi box that works in every room in the house?
I don't regard it as the telco's job to design my home network for me. (I'm certainly not paying them for such a service.)


I take the telco's broadband router, disable any wi-fi features it might have, then wire it up to my routers, switches, hubs and, yes, wi-fi access points. But these are all of specs that I've chosen, are located where I want them, and are configured how I choose to configure them.


And it all works absolutely fine. And continues to work when, every few years, the telco replaces the cable modem - I just have to make sure that the installer turns off any clever gizmos the new one contains, such as Wi-Fi access points, and configures it to be a plain vanilla modem.

radeng
26th Aug 2016, 15:26
NASA had 60 foot diameter dishes for antennas. WiFi routers are limited to 100mW EIRP at 2.4 GHz (the Harmonised European Standard is from ETSI and is EN300 389) and 400 mW at 5 GHz.

Powerline adaptors are SUPPOSED to notch out the HF amateur bands, just as many wall mounting power supplies are SUPPOSED to have filters to stop radio interference. Frequently, the holes are there on the PC board and the components aren't.

DirtyProp
26th Aug 2016, 15:50
If mission control in Houston managed to receive Armstrong's "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind" crystal clear radio transmission from a quarter million miles away on the moon almost 50 years ago, why can't those pricks at British Telecom hook me up with a wifi box that works in every room in the house?
Shurely those big bush wheels you installed some time ago are too large and block the signal.
:}

ORAC
26th Aug 2016, 16:36
You could always switch to LiFi-X....

pureLiFi? LiFi-X - pureLiFi? (http://purelifi.com/lifi-products/lifi-x/)