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LowNSlow
16th Aug 2016, 14:11
When is the official end of an Ice Age?

Is it when the polar ice caps melt completely?

Is it when the glaciers retreat to a point where nobody either lives or cares?

Is it when somebody in government decides that taxing us until we squeak is no longer going to work?

Ancient Mariner
16th Aug 2016, 14:49
That will be when Ice Age XXII is released sans the squirrel.
Per

Una Due Tfc
16th Aug 2016, 15:02
When a man can go for a swim without his bits becoming an internal organ?

LowNSlow
16th Aug 2016, 15:25
AM noooooo, you've got to have the squirrel!!

Random SLF
16th Aug 2016, 15:41
Agreed, it evolves into Wile E. Coyote!

SASless
16th Aug 2016, 15:53
When the Polar Ice Cap completely melts?

In that case we are still in an Ice Age and any warming cannot be attributed to AGW as we have to pass through a "normal" period before we can get to the abnormal which the AGW Zealots think has happened with the advent Man Involved Fire.

Ancient Mariner
16th Aug 2016, 16:05
When a man can go for a swim without his bits becoming an internal organ?
No hope in the forseeable future for us Norskies then. :(
Per

Una Due Tfc
16th Aug 2016, 16:11
No hope in the forseeable future for us Norskies then. :(
Per

You have nice spas so all is not lost, and you all must be doing something right to keep those blonde beauties happy.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=7Znw7Da1n6c

Ancient Mariner
16th Aug 2016, 17:04
You have nice spas so all is not lost, and you all must be doing something right to keep those blonde beauties happy.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=7Znw7Da1n6c

Yup, we stay well away from our frozen beaches.
The North Sea belongs to fish, seals and whales, or food as we like to call it.
Per

Sue VÍtements
16th Aug 2016, 22:49
The two events may well coincide

James 1077
16th Aug 2016, 23:38
When is the official end of an Ice Age?

An ice age is defined as the presence of continental and polar ice caps; this means that we are still living in an ice age as we have continental ice caps (Greenland, Antarctica) and polar ones (Arctic Ocean and Antarctica again).

Colloquially people tend to call glacial periods (the colder bits, when ice caps tend to advance) "ice ages", and interglacials (the warmer parts, when they retreat) as "not ice ages". This isn't technically true as they are simply different parts of the single ice age (however, due to the current ice age starting 2.6 million years ago it is reasonable for most people to think that the current conditions are "normal", even though they have only occurred about 4 times before now).

Interglacials tend to last about 12,000 years before things get cold again; and we are about 11,000 years through the current one. But the one before this lasted about 25,000 years so we may have a bit to go. The main driver behind glacials and interglacials are Milankovitch Cycles (variations in Earth's orbit) and if you mark these out then we may have even more to go in the current interglacial as these don't predict another glacial for 50,000 years or so. So, even if driving your SUV made a difference, I wouldn't recommend doing so as humankind will probably have left the planet before you notice it anyway!

LowNSlow
17th Aug 2016, 10:02
James, thanks for the breakdown. I wont bother telling my grandkids to buy thick coats then!

funfly
17th Aug 2016, 11:57
James you make a sensible point. While we are all aware that the human race contributes to 'global warming' many people think that it is all due to us and forget that is it a natural cycle of the planet as indeed are the various species that inhabit it. I live in Cheshire and children are amazed when I tell them that only 12,000 years ago there was over 1,000 feet of ice covering this area.
I understand that the planet Earth has actually spent more periods of time with no ice caps at all that with any, with the resulting higher levels of seas. Perhaps James could enlighten me on this.

G-CPTN
17th Aug 2016, 17:45
Whilst I realise that you are talking in 10s of 1000s of years, there is 'evidence' of minor variations within the last 1000s of years - for example the scant clothing worn by the Romans during their occupation of Northern England around 100AD and the festivals held on the frozen River Thames in the 16th Century.