PDA

View Full Version : Drunk gets into police cruiser thinking it was a taxi cab


rotornut
7th Aug 2016, 15:16
Police arrest intoxicated man who hopped into police cruiser after mistaking it for cab | CP24.com (http://www.cp24.com/news/police-arrest-intoxicated-man-who-hopped-into-police-cruiser-after-mistaking-it-for-cab-1.3018450)

tarantonight
7th Aug 2016, 15:38
Police arrest intoxicated man who hopped into police cruiser after mistaking it for cab | CP24.com (http://www.cp24.com/news/police-arrest-intoxicated-man-who-hopped-into-police-cruiser-after-mistaking-it-for-cab-1.3018450)

No doubt more than one member of the Thin Blue Line with a Sherry or two on board has got into a brightly coloured Taxi thinking it was a mate on nights who could take them home......

RAT 5
7th Aug 2016, 15:58
Classic case of misrepresentation of a story by the headlines.

Ancient Mariner
7th Aug 2016, 17:50
Police arrest intoxicated man who hopped into police cruiser after mistaking it for cab | CP24.com (http://www.cp24.com/news/police-arrest-intoxicated-man-who-hopped-into-police-cruiser-after-mistaking-it-for-cab-1.3018450)
Did the same thing, Fort Lauderdale 1970, 16 years old and with more than a few too many on board.
The next morning the judge wanted to know if I had been intoxicated the night before. Considering I've flagged down a police cruiser I could see no point denying.
Cost me 75 USD, a fortune at the time.
Fun thing, in the next cage a colleague had a bigger hangover than I.
The captain was not overly pleased when we showed up at the dock around lunchtime.
Per

Rwy in Sight
7th Aug 2016, 19:05
Not really an achievement.

My father went to meet a school friend who studied nuclear science, I think, in Tennessee. My father arrived late at night and was looking for a cab to go to his friends place. However only a cruiser was around and its crew spotted my father and offer him a ride to check his story (why he visited the area and if his friend was real). So they did drove him to his destination, made sure who his friends was and wave them goodnight.

rotornut
7th Aug 2016, 22:45
US cops aren't all bad. I've only had good experiences with them.

air pig
8th Aug 2016, 00:01
Did hear of a case when I was in Dubai some years ago of two guys come out of a club and get into a police car and were taken to the police HQ in Bur Dubai, locked up and given a good kicking before being released next day.

Another case of a guy driving whilst under the influence in Saudi, chased by the Mutawa ( religious police) and arrested taken onto the local police station. Got away with it because the desk sergeant demanded he was handed over to his custody and because he was as drunk as the driver he got away with it also he hated the Mutawa.

Lonewolf_50
8th Aug 2016, 01:37
The 33-year-old man, investigators say, thought the vehicle was a cab and officers later learned he was wanted on an outstanding bench warrant.

It is not known what charge he was previously facing.The fellow did the cops' job for them, in terms of being brought to account for that other matter. Inadvertent civic mindedness, I suppose.

Stanwell
8th Aug 2016, 01:43
The Religious Police?
Sergeant Murphy was certainly one of those.
The difference was that he'd drop you home with an instruction to drop a couple of dollars in the poor-box next Sunday.
Times have changed, have they?

pattern_is_full
8th Aug 2016, 02:08
One would think the miscreant would get a little credit for at least attempting to take a cab while drunk - rather than driving himself.
____________

From a slightly different angle: Once while on a Denver high-rise balcony, I and friends heard a classic automotive "BANGCRUNCH!" from the street below. Leaning over, we espyed a car that had failed to stop for a red light, and rear-ended the stopped car in front.

The car in front was - of course - a police cruiser. In pure Car 54, Where Are You? TV comedy style, both policemen in unison slowly opened their doors, stepped out, hitched up their belts with deliberation, and turned to stare at the offending driver, shaking their heads.

Couldn't see their faces from our angle and height - but I am sure they were struggling to keep straight faces. "Oh, you poor, poor schmuck!"

alwayzinit
8th Aug 2016, 11:03
A few years ago walking back from the Flying Saucer in Houston I caught my toe on a raised pavement slab. Did the standard jig and stumble, though managed to stay upright JUST.
Immediately a siren whooes and disco lights come on behind me and a HPD cruiser slides to a halt next to me.
After a brief chat the lads in blue gave me a lift to the hotel!! Seems I was lucky!

treadigraph
8th Aug 2016, 13:09
I got a lift in a police car to the pub once - I was giving them a hand with a surveillance task; after they had set up their kit in my house, they aksed where I was off to next - "the pub". "We'll give you a lift then". Sadly it was a "plain clothes" CID car and they declined to use the blues and twos as we approached the door of my regular...

TWT
8th Aug 2016, 13:33
After a party at a friend's house,I ended up at an unfamiliar, deserted railway station at 2am one morning,hoping for a train to come along.I had very wobbly boots.I saw a police car pull up.The 2 cops walked up to where I was and enquired as to what I was doing there.When I told them,they looked at each other,and told me they'd give me a lift to the next well populated,brightly lit station a few stops along.The station I was at had a bad reputation,they said.They were 'good cops'.

Reverserbucket
8th Aug 2016, 14:00
A colleague of mine was visiting for work from out of State for a week and was in town for the Labor Day holiday. Staying in a bar-less hotel but a busy metropolitan district, he strolled along to the local 7-eleven and bought a 6 pack of Coors Light or similar with the intention of enjoying a couple of cold ones whilst watching the game later.

Strolling back to the hotel (this was around 11am), adult beverages protected by a brown paper bag, itself carried in a double grocery bag, he was 'pulled over' by a cruiser - lights and sirens on, whereby the cop tells him to put the bag on the floor then proceeds to question him at length about his intent and why he is walking along the sidewalk carrying what appeared to be adult beverages that were identifiable apparently, despite the triple protection of the bags and before noon. He told me the cop had his hand resting on his firearm during the entire conversation whilst my colleague showed him ID and explained what he was doing.

He was let go with his beers but said that he was aware the cruiser was following him for the final couple of hundred yards to the hotel. This was a Texan in a professional occupation, smart/casually dressed and stone-cold sober visiting another U.S. State in the 21st Century. He was quite shaken by the experience.

MadsDad
8th Aug 2016, 14:47
Lots of years ago, got home from a party at about 3.00 am and realised I had forgotten my key. Dad was due to be getting up for 'earlies' at about 5.00 so I just set off to wander round the village for a while until the lights came on at home. Couple of minutes later Constable Smith pulls up alongside me:-

"What are you doing this time of night"

I explain my predicament.

"You had better come along with me then" said the Constable. And proceeded to take me to the local police station, where they gave me a cell to kip in for what was left of the night (and did not lock the door).

G-CPTN
8th Aug 2016, 14:49
Lots of years ago, got home from a party at about 3.00 am and realised I had forgotten my key. Dad was due to be getting up for 'earlies' at about 5.00 so I just set off to wander round the village for a while until the lights came on at home. Couple of minutes later Constable Smith pulls up alongside me:-

"What are you doing this time of night"

I explain my predicament.

"You had better come along with me then" said the Constable. And proceeded to take me to the local police station, where they gave me a cell to kip in for what was left of the night (and did not lock the door).
Was it comfortable on the crossbar?

Traffic_Is_Er_Was
8th Aug 2016, 14:54
As a young man stumbling home very "happy" after a pub crawl, I flagged down what I thought was a taxi and jumped in the back to find two men in blue looking at me over their shoulders from the front seats. Somehow I managed to communicate my mistaken intentions to them, and they drove me home. Score another for the good cops.

Tigger_Too
8th Aug 2016, 15:36
Walking down Strait Street ("The Gut") in Valetta in the early hours of a Saturday morning. About 100 yards ahead was a dark blue van. Two shore patrol sailors hopped out of the van and walked briskly into a bar. 30 seconds later, they re-appeared with a slightly unstable, and much less smart, sailor held firmly between them. Into the back of the van he went. We were walikng slowly, so this scene repeated itself about three times along the road before we got close to the van. Now, we reached the back door of the van just as the two sailors with big sticks entered another bar. Feeling sorry for the occupants, and having noted that the back door was secured only with a metal bar, we decided to set them free. About six of them hopped out and legged it (without a word of thanks - bloody rude). So as the shore patrol exited the bar, the only ones left were .... us.

We didn't think it was a taxi, but we did get a ride in a police car!

Rwy in Sight
8th Aug 2016, 20:00
they gave a cell to kip

A lady friend's father was a gendarme. At times her mother had to visit the son of the family in a fairly far away city so dad was alone in charge of the little daughter. Obviously when he was in night duty she gathered her stuff and spent the night in the kip of the precinct her father worked.

Stanwell
8th Aug 2016, 20:42
Thanks for that, Tigger.
Made my day, it did.
You owe me a new keyboard, BTW.

Sue VÍtements
10th Aug 2016, 00:26
I was in California once, outside Santa Barbara and had dinner with my family at The Cold Spring Tavern (http://www.coldspringtavern.com/index.html). They tried to get me to drink something, but back then (I kid you not) I was a little angel so refused on the grounds that I was driving and the two just didn't go together. They kept trying and I kept refusing.

Which was good because it's half way up a mountain, along a really winding road and on the way back down I noticed there was a vehicle behind me with a red light about where the door mirror was. A shitey and very confusing system, ffs, why can;t they have gumballs like a proper scuffer mobile, but regardless I got the hint to pull over.

These two young lads got out and said that I had crossed the yellow line and therefore they wanted to do a sobriety check. I couldn't help it but responded "Hey it's a rental and it's apiece of shit" Seriously you had to drive with about 40 degrees or right aileron down just to go in a straight line and I challenged them to give it a go.

My family was sniggering (which fails the spellcheck) and when they asked me why I recounted how they had tried to get me to drink some of the wine we'd had, but that I'd refused. They started the "field sobriety checks" got through a few of them and then said "Look we're sorry, it's obvious you've not had anything to drink, but we've started so we have to continue.".

I said "well let's go on then - because it was interesting and finally they made me blow into a machine that would read breath alcohol level. At that point it became a little more serious because a machine was now sitting in judgement, rather than a human, so I asked what would happen if I refused. "Then we'd take you downtown" they said, so I agreed. I blew into this thing and it read zero, so I was free to go ... but not before I made them pay for it.

Somewhere I have a picture of me with two of California Highway Patrol's youngest and brightest, with big smiles all around.

It worked out.