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dazdaz1
5th Aug 2016, 12:25
Why pay more for rapeseed oil? When one can purchase (UK) vegetable oil, take a look at the 'ingredients' on the vegetable oil label...... Rapeseed!!

I suspect a con going on.

Metro man
5th Aug 2016, 12:28
Try gluten free if you want to see a con in progress. Find a product which doesn't contain gluten anyway, stick a "Gluten Free" label on it and mark it up 20%.

radeng
5th Aug 2016, 12:38
Isn't it rather like the 'organic' label - meaning basically grown in manure? As opposed to non-organic - grown in the same chemicals?

Tesco's vegetable oil is rapeseed. It's interesting how old the use of rapeseed oil is - it was used in lamps in the 1800s and probably before.

57mm
5th Aug 2016, 13:39
One of of our Sqn Navs was known to nip home to his OMQ, throw a groundsheet over the bed, then empty a gallon of cooking oil over it. Then he and his good lady would climb on board for some wrestling......

vctenderness
5th Aug 2016, 14:29
A couple of slippery customers indeed!

meadowrun
5th Aug 2016, 14:56
Surprised the PC crowd hasn't been all over yer rapeseed oil.
They were here - or at least the marketing PC folks. It's called Canola Oil,

vulcanised
5th Aug 2016, 16:33
You can't beat Castrol R
.

Krystal n chips
5th Aug 2016, 16:47
" Isn't it rather like the 'organic' label - meaning basically grown in manure? As opposed to non-organic - grown in the same chemicals?"

Organic is basically a marketing inspired con ( note: this excludes those providers who do genuinely use organic farming methods ) used by the supermarkets to delude the gullible. The best one I ever saw was organic cat food.....c/o JS.

However organic has now been surpassed with...."artisan created" and "locally sourced produce" in restaurants in particular .....which I suppose is true, there are various forms of markets in Manchester, Glasgow, Leeds etc...but a distinct shortage of, erm, farms.

Stanwell
5th Aug 2016, 17:00
Ah yes, Castrol R.
Organically grown - and, good for coughs, colds and sore holes.
Most efficacious when inhaled at concentrations no greater than .001% and at temperatures above 1200deg C.

ShyTorque
5th Aug 2016, 17:12
One of of our Sqn Navs was known to nip home to his OMQ, throw a groundsheet over the bed, then empty a gallon of cooking oil over it. Then he and his good lady would climb on board for some wrestling......
I can imagine the scenario: "Sorry dear, I'm just slipping back out because I have to go back to work...!"

Fairdealfrank
5th Aug 2016, 21:56
Cooking oil
Why pay more for rapeseed oil? When one can purchase (UK) vegetable oil, take a look at the 'ingredients' on the vegetable oil label...... Rapeseed!!

I suspect a con going on.

Try gluten free if you want to see a con in progress. Find a product which doesn't contain gluten anyway, stick a "Gluten Free" label on it and mark it up 20%.
Isn't it rather like the 'organic' label - meaning basically grown in manure? As opposed to non-organic - grown in the same chemicals?

Tesco's vegetable oil is rapeseed. It's interesting how old the use of rapeseed oil is - it was used in lamps in the 1800s and probably before.
Also check out the "low fat, "reduced fat", "light", healthy (sic) versions of various foods, usually stuffed full of SUGAR!

Tankertrashnav
5th Aug 2016, 22:05
However organic has now been surpassed with...."artisan created"

As far as I'm concerned "aritisan created" (see also "artisanal") means overpriced and intended for sale to gullible mugs. There's a bloke (sorry "artisan") in the Cotswolds flogging loaves of bread @ 21 a pop - and apparently he can sell as many as he can make!

G-CPTN
5th Aug 2016, 22:07
I heard of a family who called their pet feline 'cooking fat'.

Takan Inchovit
5th Aug 2016, 22:36
I heard of a family who called their pet feline 'cooking fat'.


Did it get nervous when the bottle of oil came out?

Hydromet
5th Aug 2016, 22:49
I heard of a family who called their pet feline 'cooking fat'. Ah yes, the Spooner family, I think.

meadowrun
6th Aug 2016, 00:16
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/new_diamond_shreddies.jpg

onetrack
6th Aug 2016, 04:07
Insect spray in pressurised cans - and "name brand" laundry detergents - are two of the greatest "price cons" around.

Went to buy some insect spray, and examined the listed chemical content and makeup of the ingredients, between the supermarket "home" brand, and the well-known, constantly-advertised, global-corporation brand - and discovered the chemical content and makeup was precisely the same, as regards the constituents and their percentages!

But the price difference was - $2.80 for the "home" brand, and $9.60 for the global-corporation brand!!
But I must admit, the "home" brand can was only 300g, and the "name" brand was 350g.
Regardless, even the extra 16.666% in volume doesn't justify the 342% difference in pricing for the "name" brand.

Laundry detergents all comprise similar cleaning-oriented chemical compounds - and there's a similar discrepancy between the "home" brands, and the "name" brands, with those products as well.

meadowrun
6th Aug 2016, 05:49
I suppose it would be amusing to get into the 100% Virgin Olive Oil aspect of this.
Some estimates run around 80% not.
Even the old "you get what you pay for" does not protect you.

cavortingcheetah
6th Aug 2016, 06:00
Beef dripping: roast potatoes and spread on bread or hot toast.
Pork dripping: fried bread and anything that smacks of British culinary taste.
Fish and chips: Battered with mix of flour and water or beer. Not cooked with oil.
Olive oil: foreign imports used with vegetables and salads which are not British dietary foods.
No cooking oil is essential to British food preparation.

onetrack
6th Aug 2016, 07:18
CC - So, what are your fish and chips actually cooked in? Every fish and chip I've ever seen has a huge deep fryer filled with oil.

Down here in the underworld, it's usually "blended edible vegetable oils" in the deep fryers, which gives the manufacturers plenty of leeway to vary the constituents.
Cottonseed oil is a very large % of the blended oil content (because it's cheap) - but the blend can also contain safflower oil, canola oil, peanut oil, sunflower seed oil, and soy bean oil.

You'd better advise about 20 million cooks and chefs in Britain about that requirement for "No cooking oil is essential to British food preparation".
Stepdaughter spent several years in the U.K., and regularly complained about how, "the British deep fry everything!" :yuk:

She was desperate for some simple steamed vegetables when she was in a restaurant once, and saw vegetables offered as a side dish.
She ordered them, thinking that she was going to get all her much-desired, lovely simple steamed vegetables - and every single vegetable turned up, coated in batter and deep fried!! :rolleyes:

Metro man
6th Aug 2016, 07:47
Proper chips are fried in beef dripping which is more expensive than cooking oil but gives a better taste.

Cooking oil is essential in Scotland so they can deep fry pizza and mars bars. The closest any Scot comes to fresh vegetables is baked beans and chips.

UniFoxOs
6th Aug 2016, 08:27
Proper chips are fried in beef dripping which is more expensive than cooking oil but gives a better taste.

Very few places use this nowadays - I only know of one. I don't think it's the cost of the dripping as much as the power and time needed to melt it before heating it to frying temperature.

We only use rapeseed oil for frying (shallow, we don't deep fry) since our local expert chef informed of the problems with heating olive oil. We buy the supermarket own brand but check the label first as "Vegetable oil" or "Cooking oil" could be anything.

Tankertrashnav
6th Aug 2016, 09:48
Rick Stein's chippy in Falmouth uses beef dripping

Nice chips - but expensive!

ricardian
6th Aug 2016, 09:53
Proper chips are fried in beef dripping which is more expensive than cooking oil but gives a better taste.

Cooking oil is essential in Scotland so they can deep fry pizza and mars bars. The closest any Scot comes to fresh vegetables is baked beans and chips.
Try mince & tatties, or stovies

Yamagata ken
6th Aug 2016, 12:02
Stepdaughter spent several years in the U.K., and regularly complained about how, "the British deep fry everything!"That's a curious thing. I've spent much of my life in the UK and never had deep-fried vegetables with my lamb and potatoes. Perhaps she was going to the wrong sort of restaurant?

I've also spent plenty of time in Oz, and come across the ''meat pie'' aka ''gravy pie'' aka ''slurry pie''. When you come across the famous ''Australian meat pie'' there are a few tricks to bear in mind. It comprises a waxy case filled with brown slurry. Be careful. Opening the slurry pie carelessly will result in a deluge of hot brown fluid. Don't bother looking for meat: there is none. Check the packing carefully. There may be a lecture on cuisine from an Australian smartarse.

meadowrun
6th Aug 2016, 12:53
Part-time, once upon a time Aussie, There is a fair amount of gravy in a good pie but there is usually a good portion of meat as well.
Main thing to worry about is not burning your mouth to hell and back with the first bite.

Metro man
6th Aug 2016, 13:09
Buy a supermarket own brand economy pie and you can't expect too much. Buy a good one from a recommended source it will be much better with discernible chunks of meat but it will cost more. Surprised ?

dazdaz1
6th Aug 2016, 13:24
That reminds me K&C post #9 Organic.... I've noticed supermarkets sell organic honey, how do the bee keepers/producers know where the bees feed on nectar, it might be some roadside verge a few miles away. I can only presume each bee has a tag and is followed to ensure the flowering bud is organic.

piperpa46
6th Aug 2016, 13:39
That reminds me K&C post #9 Organic.... I've noticed supermarkets sell organic honey, how do the bee keepers/producers know where the bees feed on nectar, it might be some roadside verge a few miles away. I can only presume each bee has a tag and is followed to ensure the flowering bud is organic.
You are probably not going to like this, but it is regulated by EU regulation 834/2007.
http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2007:189:0001:0023:EN:PDF


In order for honey to be labelled organic, every nectar and pollen source within 2 miles of the bee hives must bee organic. That is regulated by making sure all farms in the area are organic and it is assumed that the roadside verge in the radius are organic as well.

G-CPTN
6th Aug 2016, 13:40
That reminds me K&C post #9 Organic.... I've noticed supermarkets sell organic honey, how do the bee keepers/producers know where the bees feed on nectar, it might be some roadside verge a few miles away. I can only presume each bee has a tag and is followed to ensure the flowering bud is organic.
In Northumberland (and elsewhere) apiarists place their hives 'out on the moors' (where heather and wild blossoms grow).

Those bees would be unlikely to fly long distances when there is ample pollen available locally.

dazdaz1
6th Aug 2016, 14:25
Your posts Piperpa46 and G-CPTN make sense. Myself sounding pedantic.... "Those bees would be unlikely to fly long distances when there is ample pollen available locally"

10.000 bees per hive (give or take 1000) and maybe 30-50-100 hives that's one hell of allot of bees. "In order for honey to be labelled organic, every nectar and pollen source within 2 miles of the bee hives must bee organic"

Presuming birds carry seeds (from afar) in their plumage and these seeds fall to ground and germinate I fail to accept claims that the honey is 100% organic in an open environment.

meadowrun
6th Aug 2016, 14:34
Or that the road and rail verges in the 2 mile radius are not dutifully sprayed to cut back on over growth.

vctenderness
6th Aug 2016, 14:38
I know this thread is drifting a bit but I read recently that most Manuka honey sold is fake as there are not enough of the bees in existence to produce that amount.

dazdaz1
6th Aug 2016, 14:43
No problems with a thread drift.

Daz OP

G-CPTN
6th Aug 2016, 14:50
Or that the road and rail verges in the 2 mile radius are not dutifully sprayed to cut back on over growth.
The locations that I am thinking about - there are no highways (and certainly no railways) within 2 miles.

Map:- https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/Northumberland/@55.3727758,-2.3279685,9z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x487d857e0c6f64cd:0xbfbaeefce462c499!8m2!3d 55.2082542!4d-2.0784138

http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01371/phoney1_1371571c.jpg

vctenderness
6th Aug 2016, 16:30
Those bloody burka clad Muslims get everywhere!

Cazalet33
6th Aug 2016, 17:45
Bees travel a hell of a lot more than two miles to forage.

Have a look at this well-researched academic paper:
Long-range foraging by the honey-bee (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1046/j.1365-2435.2000.00443.x/pdf)

Summary
1. Waggle dances of honey-bees (Apis mellifera L.) were decoded to determine where
and how far the bees foraged during the blooming of heather (Calluna vulgaris L.)
in August 1996 using a hive located in Sheffield, UK, east of the heather moors. The
median distance foraged was 61 km, and the mean 55 km. Only 10% of the bees
foraged within 05 km of the hive whereas 50% went more than 6 km, 25% more than
75 km and 10% more than 95 km from the hive.

G-CPTN
6th Aug 2016, 17:49
Bees travel a hell of a lot more than two miles to forage.

Have a look at this well-researched academic paper:
Long-range foraging by the honey-bee (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1046/j.1365-2435.2000.00443.x/pdf)

50% went more than 6 km, 25% more than 75 km and 10% more than 95 km from the hive.
Amazing that bees can find their way back (presumably to their home hive) after travelling so far.

I'm not questioning the distance, merely amazed at the ability to return.

How fast do they travel?

Cazalet33
6th Aug 2016, 18:07
About 12mph outbound, about 8mph with a full cargo.

Their ability to navigate is amazing enough, but their ability to communicate nav data to other bees is truly astonishing.

The waggle dance communicates a bearing and a distance, but that's Rho-Theta is from the hive to the locus. It's not a QDM. If the bees have to fly around a major obstacle such as a high hill, they somehow do the traverse maths in their heads to compensate for all the legs of the flight sector, both when giving a waggle dance and when using that nav data to do the cross-country flight having seen someone else's waggle dance.

Amazing critters. Endlessly fascinating.

Tankertrashnav
6th Aug 2016, 22:42
Going back to deep frying. If you think about it, if you coat fish in batter then deep fry it, you actually end up with nice moist fish which has been steamed in its own juices, encased in fried batter. Actually much less fatty than fish which has been shallow fried in a pan.

My wife dislikes fried food, so when we buy fish from the chippy she peels off the batter and then has a nice tasty piece of steamed fish to eat.

Personally I eat the lot, which may account for the fact that I weigh more than twice than Mrs TTN!

Stanwell
6th Aug 2016, 22:49
TTN,
So what?
I've been told that life is a death sentence, anyway.

Cazalet,
Must go along with your post #40.
.

mgahan
6th Aug 2016, 23:07
As my old RAAF mate Shagger used to tell ATC Students at C Flight CFS:

"Life is a sexually transmitted terminal disease."

MJG

dazdaz1
7th Aug 2016, 13:40
Slightly along the theme of Tankertrashnav post #41 If taking home the fish & chips never have vinegar added to the bag, it makes the batter soggy.

radeng
7th Aug 2016, 16:48
Regarding 'organic' stuff. Anybody know what the difference is between 'organic gin' and Tanqueray or Plymouth?

Effluent Man
7th Aug 2016, 17:01
Ref the "cooking fat" name for the cat, I dubbed my mate's neighbour. "Strange Container"
His name is Bunny Fox

BigEndBob
7th Aug 2016, 20:55
Notice how cooking oil prices follow diesel prices, always a few p cheaper, but never enough to warrant it's use as fuel, ever since the Government said that for personal use 4,000 litres was the limit for not paying duty.
Cooking oil prices should be way lower.
Like 20p litre when I use to put it in my car.

jimtherev
7th Aug 2016, 22:19
Ref chips or (because they claim to be the inventors) French Fries or (because they claim to have a better claim to be the inventors but don't bother to call them...) Belgian Fries:
Has anyone else visited the Chip Museum in Bruges? Yes, really. Lots of information on the best type of potato and best temperature to (always double-fry) chips. But concealed in all this plethora of info, but nevertheless there to be spotted, is the Belgian claim that the very best chips are cooked in a mixture of beef and horse dripping.


Erindoors was disgusted when I told her this, and refused to believe it. So I still haven't told her that the delicious steaks that we had eaten the evening before were also horsemeat.
Well, a chap has a sense of self-preservation...

underfire
7th Aug 2016, 22:22
Olive oil facts.

'First cold pressed': it is all first cold pressed, there is no warm pressed, and olives are not pressed, ie run through a centrifuge, more than once. Time is of the essence in production, and with the olives coming in and ripening, there is no second run (except see below).

Virgin and Extra Virgin: The title is completely based on pH. Olives get ripe for oil and there is a very short time to press them. The Spanish typically wait, as the olives get bigger and have more oil, but the pH goes up. They then cut the oil with other oil to get the pH down to call it Virgin or Extra Virgin. Much of the time this is short lived for the 'test' and what you actually buy is not either.
The Italian olive oil is also cut, and typically with other oils than olive to get the pH down. Olive oils that failed to meet the ‘extra virgin’ olive oil standards:
Bertolli
Carapelli
Colavita
Star
Filippo Berio
Mazzola
Mezzetta
Newman’s Own
Safeway
Whole Foods

Olive oil 'light': This oil is typically only partially olive oil. This is usually made by taking the left over olive mash from the centrifuge and heating it to extract a bit more oil. This is very low quality oil.

In two studies, UC Davis researchers analyzed a total of 186 extra virgin olive oil samples against standards established by the International Olive Council (IOC) The brands that failed to meet the extra virgin olive oil standards, according to this study: Bertolli, Carapelli, Colavita, Star, Pompeian. Eat Grown Local also reports: Filippo Berio, Mazzola, Mezzetta, Newman's Own, Safeway, and Whole Foods in this list; the data may be from the earlier 2010 study when more brands were evaluated.
Of the five top-selling imported "extra virgin" olive oil brands in the United States, 73 percent of the samples failed the IOC sensory standards for extra virgin olive oils analyzed by two IOC-accredited sensory panels. The failure rate ranged from a high of 94 percent to a low of 56 percent depending on the brand and the panel. None of the Australian and California samples failed both sensory panels, while 11 percent of the top-selling premium Italian brand samples failed the two panels. Sensory defects are indicators that these samples are oxidized, of poor quality, and/or adulterated with cheaper refined oils.

Tankertrashnav
7th Aug 2016, 22:54
I remember when your mum got a little bottle of olive oil from the chemist, warmed some up on a spoon and poured it in your ear when you had earache.

No idea if it was virgin, extra virgin or old slapper. Didn't matter, she never actually put the stuff on our food!

Metro man
7th Aug 2016, 23:12
Modern Diesel engines require a very high quality fuel, pouring in cooking oil through a sieve is guaranteeing engine damage and will likely void any warranty. The days of the rugged diesel motor are over, turbo chargers and all the emissions gear have increased complexity and reduced reliability.

Stanwell
7th Aug 2016, 23:41
So what do I do with my old cooking oil now then?
Dear Martha, I need advice on this.

UniFoxOs
8th Aug 2016, 06:22
Anybody know what the difference is between 'organic gin' and Tanqueray or Plymouth?

About five quid a bottle?

meadowrun
8th Aug 2016, 07:20
The organic probably refers to the botanicals used in making the gin.

gemma10
8th Aug 2016, 11:40
Just had a look at my bottle of Tesco vegetable oil. Ingredients- Rapeseed oil.

Karearea
9th Aug 2016, 05:04
Is "rice bran oil" commonly used in the Northern Hemisphere? It seems to be much promoted here, yet would not have been heard of a few years ago. :suspect:

DirtyProp
9th Aug 2016, 05:47
The closest any Scot comes to fresh vegetables is baked beans and chips.
A-ha, that's why they speak so funny.
The poor things are always constipated.

Metro man
9th Aug 2016, 07:03
The famous Glasgow salad.

http://s252.photobucket.com/user/scotttswan/media/munchy-640-3.jpg.html

underfire
9th Aug 2016, 08:02
In the 1970s canola was created through traditional plant cross-breeding by removing two things found in the rapeseed plant: glucosinolates and erucic acid. Erucic acid was removed because it was believed to be inedible or toxic in high doses. The newly developed plant was renamed "canola" – a combination of "Canadian" and "Oil" (or ola) to make this difference apparent.

Surprised you can still buy rapeseed oil, thought it had been sent to 3rd world countries. Oh never mind.