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NorthernChappie
3rd Aug 2016, 17:47
I got an email today (and a text). The email is reproduced below EXACTLY as it was received. I haven't substituted any characters including all the $$. Now I don't bank with NatWest, so naturally it was a scam. Except it wasn't. Thought I would just check as I did make a (larger than normal) payment to a new payee.


I do bank with RBS and there was a payment that was being queried. Took an hour on the phone before the payment went through.


What the fcuk are you supposed to do other than assume that the text below is a scam





Your partial postcode: $$Second_Part_of_Postcode
Please refer to the Security section in the footer of this email for information about this.

Dear $$title $$full_name

We are contacting you as we have noticed an unusual payment leaving your account. Although this may be genuine, it was picked up by our fraud monitoring service as potentially fraudulent.

Payment details are as follows: $$value on $$date to $$beneficiary.

Since we were unable to make contact with you by phone, we decided to delay the payment for your protection. As a further precaution we have temporarily suspended access to your online banking.

The funds will be held for 72 hours from when they were due to leave the account. If we do not receive confirmation that it is genuine within this time the payment will be automatically rejected.

Please contact us URGENTLY on the following numbers: -

Dialling from within the UK: 0800 161 5165 or 0345 301 4121
Dialling from outside of the UK: +44 1268 508 222

Should you be unsure of the validity of this email and the contact numbers please contact us on a number that you know to be genuine.

We look forward to hearing from you to resolve the issue; however if you have already spoken to us regarding this issue, please disregard this email.

Please don't reply to this email. This email is not monitored.

oldchina
3rd Aug 2016, 19:48
If they use your correct full name and they have your correct phone no. why assume it's a scam ?
On second thoughts there's NO reason to think it's a scam.
That's what banks do to protect you.
RBS=NatWest even in Alba.

G-CPTN
3rd Aug 2016, 19:57
If they use your correct full name and they have your correct phone no. why assume it's a scam ?
On second thoughts there's NO reason to think it's a scam.
I regularly receive spam telephone calls to my landline and to my mobile addressing me by my full name, so that's no guarantee.

Geordie_Expat
3rd Aug 2016, 19:57
If they use your correct full name and they have your correct phone no. why assume it's a scam ?
On second thoughts there's NO reason to think it's a scam.
That's what banks do to protect you.
NatWest = RBS.

Just beat me to it. Agree with all of the above. Personally, I am reassured that the bank checks before doling out loads of my cash. Easy to knock RBS but I have been with them since 1972 with no complaints.

Smeagol
3rd Aug 2016, 20:27
I think the point the OP was making was receiving an email full of $$$ instead of full name etc.

Or is it me that's missing something?

NorthernChappie
3rd Aug 2016, 20:30
I think the point the OP was making was receiving an email full of $$$ instead of full name etc.


Precisely.

Fairdealfrank
3rd Aug 2016, 20:30
If they use your correct full name and they have your correct phone no. why assume it's a scam ?
On second thoughts there's NO reason to think it's a scam.
That's what banks do to protect you.
RBS=NatWest even in Alba.

No, everyone sells lists of names and addresses, even councils sell the electoral roll which is why the "edited register" was introduced.

It's a big money earner but makes a mockery of data protection.

So always be careful and vigilant.

Bank at your branch not on the internet,yes it's inconvenient but it's safe. Use good old cash wherever possible, that will also help reduce cyber-crime.

That said, it's good to see banks looking out for unusual activity and monitoring peoples' accounts.

VP959
3rd Aug 2016, 21:19
Long ago I refused to give my current email address to any bank or card company. I was getting far too many scam emails and it was just too much effort trying to sift emails that might, possibly, be valid from the majority that most probably weren't.

Now I can just delete any email I receive from any bank or card company, as they have to be scams. If my bank or card company need to contact me they can write a letter.

Seems to work fine, and is a hell of a lot easier from my perspective.

Hydromet
3rd Aug 2016, 22:44
It will be a scam. If you have any doubts, ring the bank on a publicly available number e.g. from the telephone directory. Do not use the one in the email. Do not reply to the email.

Pace
4th Aug 2016, 00:31
Anyone know about Binary trading scams ?

llondel
4th Aug 2016, 01:24
Long ago I refused to give my current email address to any bank or card company.

I have an email address that I only use for the bank. That means I will at least look at it to decide whether it's genuine or not. I do remember forwarding one dodgy-looking email to the bank security department because I wasn't sure, and they told me it was a real one.

Metro man
4th Aug 2016, 01:26
NEVER EVER click on a link in a email such as this and access your account through it. Call on a number which you know to be genuine but be wary of anyone calling you.

There was a scam a while back where calls were made to people and they were asked to call back on the banks genuine number, however the scammer never disconnected the line and the call was straight back to him who now seemed 100% credible.

megan
4th Aug 2016, 04:00
The email saysShould you be unsure of the validity of this email and the contact numbers please contact us on a number that you know to be genuine.I may be dumb, but a scam would not be saying that.

Peter-RB
4th Aug 2016, 06:59
I have only once in the last few years had a suspicious e mail from a Bank, mine is in a nice little Village about 4 miles away takes 10 mins to go there and ask a nice smiling attractive lady to check, she does , and cor blimey its genuine, but it is nice to get out and see a nice attractive lady who will smile at you..!!

Blues&twos
4th Aug 2016, 08:35
Both my daughter and I have received texts at different times from NatWest asking us to confirm or reject suspicious transactions. Being naturally sceptical I rang the bank helpline rather than responding to the texts. They were genuine. Turned out my card had been cloned. Same outcome for my daughter.

ian16th
4th Aug 2016, 08:41
There was a scam a while back where calls were made to people and they were asked to call back on the banks genuine number, however the scammer never disconnected the line and the call was straight back to him who now seemed 100% credible.

Which means that you don't get a dialing tone!

VP959
4th Aug 2016, 08:45
My bank occasionally rings me to check whether a transaction is genuine or not, and always goes through a security check process to be reasonably confident that they are speaking to me, rather than an imposter.

This seems like a very much better approach than using email, if only because the email scammers are getting to be so good that it's pretty hard to tell whether the better ones are genuine or not. My wife received an email, supposedly from her bank, and assumed it was genuine. By pure luck (knowing that I've made a fuss about fake emails from banks before) she showed it to me on her iPad. It looked genuine, well-written, correct logo, authentic looking disclaimer at the bottom, etc. I decided to double check, logged into her email account from a PC (she only ever uses her iPad now) and looked at the email header. That showed it was a fake, albeit a very good one.

She's now done the same as me and asked her bank to not ever send emails, but to always write or 'phone.

Pontius Navigator
4th Aug 2016, 09:00
NEVER EVER click on a link in a email such as this and access your account through it. Call on a number which you know to be genuine but be wary of anyone calling you.

There was a scam a while back where calls were made to people and they were asked to call back on the banks genuine number, however the scammer never disconnected the line and the call was straight back to him who now seemed 100% credible.
Actually scammers often 'steal' the whole of a bank web page and modify only their little bit. Megan is also incorrect; scammers may lose 99% of those they spam but they only need it to work once.

I have an empty Lloyds account. Once received an email, clicked the link, took me to the bank web site. Every link, telephone number etc was genuine and worked. All I had to do was log in as requested; that was the scam.

What they hope is you do NOT ring a trusted number. Same with the telephone scam, use a different phone.

Pontius Navigator
4th Aug 2016, 09:02
My bank occasionally rings me to check whether a transaction is genuine or not, and always goes through a security check process to be reasonably confident that they are speaking to me, rather than an imposter..

Ah, but THEY ring you. I have had a few genuine calls where THEY call me then attempt to go through MY security details. I counter challenge and refuse to discuss my details as it was they who initiated the cold call. I was advised by the DPR that this was acceptable but I thought it a nonsense and where they do it more than once I set up my own authentication passwords that THEY have to use. Gets them every time but it works.

VP959
4th Aug 2016, 09:06
Ah, but THEY ring you. I have had a few genuine calls where THEY call me then attempt to go through MY security details. I counter challenge and refuse to discuss my details as it was they who initiated the cold call. I was advised by the DPR that this was acceptable but I thought it a nonsense and where they do it more than once I set up my own authentication passwords that THEY have to use. Gets them every time but it works.
True, but the security check is reasonably good, I think. After checking my name, address and date of birth, they ask me a question that I gave them when I opened the account, and which it's unlikely anyone else would know about.

They also prompt me to change this question once in a while, which I do. It's probably not 100% secure, but it seems more secure than email to me.

Allan Lupton
4th Aug 2016, 09:32
I get a number of e-mails "from banks" each month and as most are from banks where I have no account, it's not too difficult to identify the fraudulent ones. I have the security e-mail addresses for all the banks and forward these e-mails to the appropriate one. Over the years I've only done that to one that proved genuine.
Even the computer-semi-literate could sometimes spot that the originating e-mail address is not that of the bank it claims to be (or is in Cambodia) and hovering the mouse pointer on links often reverals a link that is very different from the one that shows.
e.g. I had one with the helpful subject
Your account has been revoked
and it came from "Barclays<[email protected]>"
It had several hopeful looking links, such as "Barclays Accounts Help Center" which was a link to somewhere impossible to identify but nothing to do with Barclays - and they wouldn't have used the US spelling for Centre!

ETA and that example wasn't even addressed to me, but was part of a BC list and the recipient was the same as the sender. Pretty transparent!

ExXB
4th Aug 2016, 09:56
I got a similar message from the knatwest. They couldn't reach me by phone because they refuse to call any non-UK phone number.

Payment was valid and they told us to resubmit it as it was impossible for them to do so. So we did so the following business day.

A couple of days later ... Another e-mail saying they had detected an unusual payment leaving my account !! AND they were unable to contact me by phone ...

We've moved most of our s to an IOM account who seem to understand the world is bigger than England.

Avtrician
4th Aug 2016, 12:31
The email, looks like it was supposed to be an auto fill where the $$Fullname etc is. However, the database doesnt seem to have been there.

The correct action is to go to / or ring a number that source from a phone book...

A bank shouldnt send open info or request contact via a link in an email.

vulcanised
4th Aug 2016, 12:35
I must applaud GMail for all the spam they catch purporting to be from a Bank.

They do sometimes slip up, but it's rare.
.

racedo
4th Aug 2016, 20:36
Both my daughter and I have received texts at different times from NatWest asking us to confirm or reject suspicious transactions. Being naturally sceptical I rang the bank helpline rather than responding to the texts. They were genuine. Turned out my card had been cloned. Same outcome for my daughter. .

I get texts when balance is below a certain amount, Card frozen today and got text from same source indicating another text would come from specific number asking me to confirm transactions. Text arrived seconds later confirmed transactions and card was unblocked. No issues in that regard as really no difficulty,

4mastacker
4th Aug 2016, 20:49
I've received a couple of scam e-mails recently purporting to come from i-Tunes. It is in the form of an invoice for 23.94 and is supposedly for an order placed on "Oyinlola's i-Phone". Easily spotted as I don't have an i-Phone and I don't do i-Tunes and my name isn't Oyinlola.

radeng
5th Aug 2016, 01:12
Some years back I had this problem with BT, who wanted to sell me some different services. They asked me to answer 'security questions' and I refused - one was 'What is your telephone number?'.

Answer " You bloody well dialled it so you should know. What did you dial?"

"can't tell you that for security reasons".

response " OK sunshine, bu**er off"

Call BT operator and ask if I should call the Police. BT operator gets all flustered and says it's genuine. I tell her that I don't believe her and call the police......A couple of hours later, lots of apologetic telephone calls from BT backed up by a latter of apology, and nothing since....

megan
5th Aug 2016, 02:27
Megan is also incorrect; scammers may lose 99% of those they spam but they only need it to work once.Quite correct in what you say PN. How many of us read the fine print when we purchase an airline ticket, hire a car, read the acceptance/agree note on software etc. If you get taken there is only one person to blame.