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View Full Version : Jeepers! I’ve got an immigrant in my bed!


larssnowpharter
3rd Aug 2016, 16:45
And it’s great!

She’s a Filipina and we met in the Middle East, married 13 years ago and decided to return to the UK, with our two sproglettes, nearly four years ago. Easy peasy you may thing. Well, no.

There were lots of requirements.

English Language Test. She actually scored 8.0 on IELTS which was probably higher than the natives of Norfolk where we were headed.

Money. I had to show an income of over GBP 18,000 pa. Fair enough as this coincides (I think) with something called tax credits available in UK. Problems getting certified 12 months accounts from 3 different countries.

Housing. We had to give details and prove ownership of our abode in UK. Again fair enough but some ‘issues’ as there was no mortgage on the property.

Health. Needed certificate from clinic in Manila some 1200 km away which was the only one in the country certified to provide this document. Return flight, hotel etc.

Application. Cost about GBP 800 plus courier costs for the 1 kg of supporting docs plus another flight to Manila and hotel.

Well, we eventually got the ‘spousal visa’ and made it to the UK and have just finished the ‘Leave to Remain’ process.

New requirement before the application can be made. Must pay GBP500 to National Health.

Application again supported by a kg of supporting documentation cost GBP 811 plus additional outlay for a BRP (Biometric Residence Permit) which is basically an immigrant ID card for non-EU migrants.

In another 3 years we will go through the whole process again and – perhaps – get her Permanent Leave to Remain and –again, perhaps – British Citizenship if she can remember the patron saint of Wales for her Life in Britain exam.

I should add that this great Lady got a job working with children within 6 weeks of our arrival. It’s only for 24 hrs/week but she loves it and is still doing it. She has also started her own small business and employs one person full time and four part time staff. Next year she plans to open a children’s nursery or soft play area with café attached.

I love my immigrant!:ok:

G-CPTN
3rd Aug 2016, 16:50
:) :D :ok:

Rather be Gardening
3rd Aug 2016, 17:47
So good to read a cheerful post when the news is full of doom and gloom. Wishing you and your lady every happiness!

Fairdealfrank
3rd Aug 2016, 19:22
Do the British Citizenship as soon as she is eligible!

Seldomfitforpurpose
3rd Aug 2016, 19:34
Now just imagine if the 180,000 EU Economic migrants coming here year after year had to go through that exact same process, now thats a nice thought.

Lonewolf_50
3rd Aug 2016, 21:04
I did the math. GBP 800 + GBP500 + GBP 811 = 2111 GBP.
If each "immigrant" arriving were to pay that fee upon arrival, would not more of them be welcome?

Seldomfitforpurpose
3rd Aug 2016, 21:25
Its about way more than the money.

G-CPTN
3rd Aug 2016, 21:44
I find it hard to resolve the OP's story with the recent influx of (obviously economic) non-EU migrants.

Parading as 'asylum seekers', when they become 'failed' (ie their application is turned down), how come they remain in the UK?

Why don't they have to jump through the same hoops?

Gertrude the Wombat
3rd Aug 2016, 21:56
I find it hard to resolve the OP's story with the recent influx of (obviously economic) non-EU migrants.
The ones I've employed recently have involved months of (non-earning) hoop-jumping, thousands of pounds in costs (not forgetting the fees to the consultants who manage the process for us), and in some cases multiple flights so that the several pieces of paper can be hand delivered by the applicant, as required, in the several right places.


And then they could disappear each time their visa runs out, until several years down the line they can apply for ILR (at more cost, and with no guarantee of getting it).


If all that cost and hassle starts applying to EU workers as well I can see management just giving up and offshoring the entire operation ... thereby losing a bunch of British jobs (including mine).

G-CPTN
3rd Aug 2016, 22:06
I wasn't questioning the stringency of the requirements for workers such as yours, rather the failed asylum seekers who seem to proliferate in certain areas.

llondel
4th Aug 2016, 00:20
It's gotten harder over the years. Back at the end of the last century it was cheaper and easier and a lot less hoops to jump though. I think during the whole process from foreigner living in the US to British Citizen, the only contact my wife had with British officials was a phone interview with the British consulate in Los Angeles. They never even contacted her references on the citizenship application. I know that converting the temporary 1-year visa to ILR took about a week from posting to receipt. When it dropped back through the door so quickly we assumed we'd done something wrong with the application and it was being returned so we could fix it but no, it was approved.

Of course, now I'm the immigrant and she's back in her native country.

Metro man
4th Aug 2016, 00:32
Cheaper to pay a people smuggler who has more chance of success. Had you gone down that route instead you would have got a free house and far more money in benefits than working would bring.

Also family members could come afterwards and receive similar treatment.

vapilot2004
4th Aug 2016, 02:09
Excellent! How's her cooking? I ask because Filipino food is among my favorites.

BlankBox
4th Aug 2016, 03:37
...been there done that...biggest chuckle was watching RCMP officer's face ...when I told him I wanted my wife finger printed... :ok:

Lonewolf_50
4th Aug 2016, 03:39
Its about way more than the money. I was making a joke. Never mind, it wasn't a very good one.

NutLoose
4th Aug 2016, 08:55
She has also started her own small business and employs one person full time and four part time staff. Next year she plans to open a children’s nursery or soft play area with café attached.

Well done !

And that in its own way makes the £35K Earnings threshold requirements stupid, You could get some Polish couple etc who have started a business, are employing people and growing that business who are living on far less as all the profits are being plowed back into the shop(s) to maintain the growth.

How do you then say to them that their earnings fall below the threshold, especially as they are bringing much needed employment and shops in areas that may well have been deprived of such in the past.

classic example

https://www.theguardian.com/money/2016/mar/12/eu-workers-deported-earning-less-35000-employees-americans-australians




.

larssnowpharter
4th Aug 2016, 09:32
Excellent! How's her cooking? I ask because Filipino food is among my favorites.

Actually, her cooking is only average! I, on the other hand am a dab hand in the kitchen and do most of the cooking including some of her Filipino favourites. When we were in the Phils I had a food blog that was moderately successful and focused on a fusion of Italian/Filipino food. That said her favourite is an English breakfast served with rice!

Its about way more than the money.

Absolutely! However, money provides the chips with which we play the game of life. At a rough calculation she paid around GBP 25,000 in taxes, National Insurance, business rates etc last year. This money goes directly into the local or national exchequer. However, she has written in bold on her visa and ID card: NO RECOURSE TO PUBLIC FUNDS.

She is a well traveled well educated lady who has adapted to life here like a duck taking to water. There has been no hint even of any racial discrimination towards her which rather confirms my view that Brits are the most tolerant people I know of. Our children settled into school very well and get glowing reports. (We do seem to be stricter than other parents here as regards homework and behaviour, though). Its hard to believe that the elder sproglette will be starting high school in September. Oddly, both sproglettes took up football at the earliest opportunity and play for local sides. They are, invariably, the most slightly built kids on the pitch and the only eurasian ones in the league but they both tackle like Nobby Stiles!

As others have remarked, our experience does contrast hugely with that of 'asylum seekers' and illegal immigrants.

vapilot2004
4th Aug 2016, 09:49
Actually, her cooking is only average! I, on the other hand am a dab hand in the kitchen and do most of the cooking including some of her Filipino favourites. When we were in the Phils I had a food blog that was moderately successful and focused on a fusion of Italian/Filipino food. That said her favourite is an English breakfast served with rice!


Oh,well well, that's quite a mix, Italiano and Filipino fusion. I have an idea I would enjoy the pairing. Grilled tomatoes and bacon and eggs with rice is something I share with my better half, also a wonderful Filipina gal. Cheers Lars!

Expatrick
4th Aug 2016, 09:50
Emigrating (retiring) to Hungary (as EU citizens) we had to go through an extensive process of registration & checks, proving independent solvency, etc with copious supporting paperwork & mandatory interview -cost about 250 Euros each, a process I found entirely reasonable.

DirtyProp
4th Aug 2016, 10:38
As others have remarked, our experience does contrast hugely with that of 'asylum seekers' and illegal immigrants.
That's because you both chose each other and started a relationship based on trust and respect, not exploitation like the asylum shoppers that want to go in the country with the most generous welfare and think they have the right to go anywhere they please.

Avtrician
4th Aug 2016, 11:21
Your Lady sounds like an intelligent hard working person who would be a great asset to British Society.

Don't think they want that sort of person in the country..

:cool::cool::cool::cool:

Loose rivets
4th Aug 2016, 15:21
The Rivetess was furrin - born down the road from Sir Ciff and Spike, she was. However, at the end of the Raj they, Anglo Indians, were offered an Indian or British passport. (I'm not sure that applied to everyone, but I can't see why not.)

What is incredible is that there were only c 400,000 of these folk trapped in that gap. They'd developed their own society, and to a large extent found it difficult to venture out of it. When the father 'departed', the mother and her four kids managed to head to the UK. They really had a difficult time - not regulations, but being thrust into a totally different culture. Their life had almost been more 'British' before they left. In north London, it was @$#@ awful by comparison but by a lot of hard work, and a premium bond no less, they got started on a long journey of rebuilding their lives. Then we met on a blind date.

How different life would have been for both of us if somehow that had been missed.

tj916
4th Aug 2016, 16:33
Oh,well well, that's quite a mix, Italiano and Filipino fusion. I have an idea I would enjoy the pairing. Grilled tomatoes and bacon and eggs with rice is something I share with my better half, also a wonderful Filipina gal. Cheers Lars!
MMMM...... Adobo.........
Had some great times with a fantastic Philipino Girl.
Well done and enjoy your life.

llondel
4th Aug 2016, 16:42
How different life would have been for both of us if somehow that had been missed.

Yes, we had an improbable sequence of events - met on-line (before it was fashionable, still dial-up modems and pay per minute phone lines) while 5500 miles apart. I certainly wouldn't be sitting in California now.