PDA

View Full Version : Do you remember the first time as a child?


meadowrun
24th Jul 2016, 19:22
You were given a pomegranate? (What the hell do I do with this?)
You were given pistachios? (Hardly worth the effort to un-shell)
I won't even mention Artichokes.

G-CPTN
24th Jul 2016, 19:38
I was 35 before I encountered artichokes.

Probably later for pistachios.

I remember pomegranates from about age 8.

ChrisVJ
24th Jul 2016, 19:45
Must have been damn near 40 before I had sushi. Now they do it as 'Sushi day' at elementary school.

Kulverstukas
24th Jul 2016, 20:02
When I was about 5, my Grandpa, who lives next door to my parents, sometimes takes me to the "Gastronom" grocery store (food supply for railroad workers) at the ground floor of his 5-story building. He bought 0,25 vodka for himself and 100 gram of black caviar for me. Woman in white coat takes caviar from the barrel with steel scoop and put it to the piece of coarse wrapping paper to weight it...

PS: Building is still there (https://goo.gl/maps/5nCCRvgiuEy), alas no black caviar for small boy any more.

Pomegranates we have quite frequently as they grew somewhere at Black Sea region of USSR, but I don't like it. Definitely no pistachios or artichokes. But there was forest and pine nuts and we don't know that caduus is edible...

Gertrude the Wombat
24th Jul 2016, 20:11
No pomegranates or pistachios as a child.


But my father did grow artichokes on his allotment, so I got taught what to do with them.


Don't think I've been served one since leaving my parents' home though.

DirtyProp
24th Jul 2016, 20:59
I love artichokes dearly, esp. dipped in olive oil and lemon juice.
Super-yummy!
And don't place salted pistachios next to me, or you won't find any in no time.

Pontius Navigator
24th Jul 2016, 21:47
Peanuts - dock side covered in them about 6 inches deep. Dockers deliberately ripped the sack and would help themselves.

I would scrape off top inch or so, bag from the next few inches and leave ones on the ground. Same with tea though I gave that to my Ps, must have been 6 at the time.

lomapaseo
24th Jul 2016, 22:01
Not me, but my offspring remember my sharing with them at their young age pistachio nuts that I couldn't open as well as a bag of macadamia nuts in their shells direct from Hawaii.

They still have found memories of the macadamias bouncing off the street pavement as they pounded them with hammers and their broken finger nails from trying to prise open the pistachios rejects from my bag.

Fishtailed
25th Jul 2016, 00:16
Pomegrannets, we had them as kids (this is the 50s) for a treat, mam would give us a half with a pin or needle to get the seeds out with:} elfnsafety:yuk:

malcolm380
25th Jul 2016, 01:03
First had pistachios at University back in the late 70s, courtesy of an Iranian student with whom I shared accommodation. He was happy to be one of us and was known to all as Persian Mike. The pistachios he brought from home were the best I've ever had, and, thanks to his friendship, I formed a lifelong opinion that Iran, its people and its produce, was a good thing.

Lonewolf_50
25th Jul 2016, 01:10
First pomegranate age 8, was a rare food in Virginia in the 60's. My older brother and I made a game out of getting the fruity bits out.

First pistachio was in a Baskin Robbins ice cream cone. First time I had to open one myself I was in my teens.

Artichokes: forced myself to eat some in a salad while on a date with a gal I was trying to impress. (Age 19) It was a weird taste. I have since grown to like them in salads and occasionally on a pizza.

vapilot2004
25th Jul 2016, 01:13
Artichokes were often around growing up in California. I believe I must have been 3 or 4, pulling the petal, refusing to dip it in mayonnaise, and pulling the goodness off through my baby teeth. I didn't discover pomegranates until I was in my early teens. Pistachio shells were always cleaved by the parents prior to my having access to the lovely nuts inside.

I recall making fried ham sandwiches for my mother and grandmother at the age of 4. Mother was fit to be tied upon hearing 'lunch is ready' - worried I damaged her new-fangled teflon pan, but I used an 'egg catcher' as I called it - plastic not metal, to manage the frying and the kitchen step-stool to reach to stove.

llondel
25th Jul 2016, 01:38
I don't think I've ever eaten a pomegranate and it's a while since I've been a child.

I remember the local pub banning us from eating pistachios because the shells that hit the floor apparently played havoc with the vacuum cleaner. We were pretty good at cleaning them up too.

As for artichokes, I tried one once and didn't like it, so that's something my wife gets to eat on her own. I don't think I tried one before we got married.

Peter-RB
25th Jul 2016, 06:57
I have vague recollections of being given a Banana in 1950/1 (aged 3/4) rationing was still partially in force on certain items after the War years, up to then the only Orange I every heard or seen was a daily spoonful of a very thick and strong tasting syrup sort of juice poured out from what seemed like a medicine bottle.. :ok:

sitigeltfel
25th Jul 2016, 08:55
I remember the local pub banning us from eating pistachios because the shells that hit the floor apparently played havoc with the vacuum cleaner. We were pretty good at cleaning them up too.

Not a childhood memory, but I remember a bar on Stearns Wharf in Santa Barbara, California where you helped yourself to a handful of unshelled peanuts from a big barrel.
It was de rigueur to drop the empty shells onto the floor to be crunched underfoot by people walking around.

KelvinD
25th Jul 2016, 09:02
Peter, I too remember well the National Health orange juice. It was collected from the local clinic, along with other stuff such as Scotts Emulsion and that bloody cod liver oil. I enjoyed the orange juice which, if I remember rightly, was diluted to drink. Bananas seemed to appear in a rush in the early 50s and at one stage we were eating (and enjoying) banana butties.

G-CPTN
25th Jul 2016, 09:18
One of my earliest genuine memories has to be the trips to the clinic (in my TanSad push chair) to collect the glass bottles of (delicious) orange juice and (revolting) cod-liver oil.
https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/81/ed/c4/81edc4a2b66a1d02b93e512d8d4c77c6.jpg
There were still tins around that had contained 'National dried milk' - but I don't remember receiving any of the milk.
http://www.homefrontthirsk.org.uk/newimages/driedmilk.jpg

gruntie
25th Jul 2016, 09:30
the only Orange I every heard or seen was a daily spoonful of a very thick and strong tasting syrup sort of juice poured out from what seemed like a medicine bottle..

Lovely, delightful, the stuff dreams are made of. Used to come from the NHS, I used to nick my younger brother's. Unfortunately unavailable for many years: bit like Sainsbury's with marble counters and women beating big blocks of butter with wooden paddles.

Tone
25th Jul 2016, 09:35
As a child of the 40s I had me first woodbine before any of this foreign muck came into the shops.

Tankertrashnav
25th Jul 2016, 10:49
It was de rigueur to drop the empty shells onto the floor to be crunched underfoot by people walking around.

There's a real ale pub in Truro (Cornwall) which has the same convention.

Not me, but I remember reading about someone who had grown up during WW2 being given his first banana when they reappeared in the shops, and trying to eat it without peeling it!

Stayed in a gite in Brittany one summer when there was a glut of artichokes and the farmer insisted on giving us dozens of the things. Never really fancied one since.

Gertrude the Wombat
25th Jul 2016, 12:28
There were still tins around that had contained 'National dried milk' - but I don't remember receiving any of the milk.
http://www.homefrontthirsk.org.uk/newimages/driedmilk.jpg
Yes, the tins had flour or rice or whatever in them in our larder.

vapilot2004
25th Jul 2016, 13:46
Steamed or par-boiled then grilled properly, artichokes are sublime.

MadsDad
25th Jul 2016, 16:00
Gertrude:- Yes, the tins had flour or rice or whatever in them in our larder.

And they've got drill bits in them in my garage.

jimtherev
25th Jul 2016, 18:31
No-one's mentioned National Dried Egg yet. Me gran made wonderful scrambled egg with the stuff. I remember crying when given scrambleys made of eggs from hens. Didn't taste like the real thing at all.

Groundgripper
25th Jul 2016, 19:48
And then there was Virol...:yuk::yuk::yuk::yuk::yuk::yuk::yuk::yuk::yuk::yuk:

GG

G-CPTN
25th Jul 2016, 19:50
And then there was Virol...:yuk::yuk::yuk::yuk::yuk::yuk::yuk::yuk::yuk::yuk:

GG
Virol was great! :ok:

Fareastdriver
25th Jul 2016, 20:00
I was jumping into bed with five year old girls when I was five.:eek::eek::eek::eek:

They were trying to get me to catch measles, chicken pox, whatever.

It wasn't the clap.

treadigraph
25th Jul 2016, 20:53
There's a real ale pub in Truro (Cornwall) which has the same convention.

I was there last year and observed a bloke doing just that - I thought he was being a right oik! The Old Ale House isn't it?

Saintsman
25th Jul 2016, 21:03
Funny enough, I was in Cyprus last week with the family and I pointed out a tree with pomegranates growing on it.

They had their photos taken next to it.

Then I had to point out lemon trees, orange, figs, bananas etc.

So much different to seeing them in bag on the supermarket shelf.

Peter-RB
25th Jul 2016, 21:23
Hey Group,
was that Virol a very thick Malt extract stuff, my Mum used to wrap a spoon in the stuff it was really like a liquid malt bread, took ages to lick the spoon clean, then after that was something called Fever-cure a clear liquid that tasted like a piece of iron should taste like,... all this talk of yesteryear has livened up some cells that ceased to work... :D

Tankertrashnav
25th Jul 2016, 22:29
treadigraph - that's the one. I used to join a couple of mates who were dedicated real ale fans there some lunchtimes. I'm not much of a beer drinker myself , so while they were drinking pints of Old Shepherd's Scrotum, or whatever, I'd exasperate them by asking for a half of "whatever is the weakest beer you have". I tried ordering a G & T once, just to annoy them, but the place only has a beer licence and can't sell spirits.

treadigraph
26th Jul 2016, 08:12
My beery mates were on the real ale, being a "local" (by birth) I was on the real cider! We stayed off the pistachios though.


I remember eating my first olive at about the age of eight. Put me off them for life. Tried one again recently and thought "ok, not bad", but I still don't ever bother with them.

Kulverstukas
26th Jul 2016, 20:41
Heh... Found illustration for my memories about black caviar:

http://img-fotki.yandex.ru/get/6108/74257169.6ec/0_96a30_1f15bda3_XL.jpg

Hempy
26th Jul 2016, 21:10
Heh... Found illustration for my memories about black caviar:


eoD0FHV4wP4

Tankertrashnav
26th Jul 2016, 22:13
That's not a genuine photo of a Russian fishmonger Kulverstukas, as there isn't a cat in the picture.

When I was in Russia in 1992 I discovered that there appeared to be a law that every butcher's and fishmonger's had to have a cat sitting on the counter!

Acquired quite a taste for caviare, which unfortunately I had to lose when I came back to the UK :(

Kulverstukas
26th Jul 2016, 22:20
That's not a genuine photo of a Russian fishmonger Kulverstukas, as there isn't a cat in the picture.

When I was in Russia in 1992 I discovered that there appeared to be a law that every butcher's and fishmonger's had to have a cat sitting on the counter!

:}

hhPS1Y4cD4g

PS: it's aviation related because it's shoot at UHWW :E

Tankertrashnav
26th Jul 2016, 22:40
Glad to see they are keeping up the old traditions Kulverstukas :ok:

Looking at the caption on the film clip, when I flew out of Sheremetyevo in 1992 you could have bought the complete contents of the single food outlet for 60,000 roubles. Times have certainly changed!

TWT
26th Jul 2016, 22:49
It was a surprise when visiting the Long Bar at Raffles in Singapore to see the peanut shells all over the floor too.Peculiar custom (obviously not a local one).

BlankBox
27th Jul 2016, 00:06
...winter of 49/50 we stayed at granny's in St Just. Since I was just a wee fella and a cuzzin from the colony ...she was alotted all kinds of rare stuff from the rationing board that she hadn't seen since before the war. I remember weekly shopping for bananas, oranges, eggs, milk (bottled), cheese and some weird brown concoction that looked like axle grease that I had to lick off the spoon. Best thing I remember (and I would trade my left *n*u*t* for...) was the almost daily trips to the Pasty baker to get our daily supply...those were the days...:)

G-CPTN
27th Jul 2016, 00:12
some weird brown concoction that looked like axle grease that I had to lick off the spoon.
That would have been the aforementioned Virol (malt extract).

Peter-RB
27th Jul 2016, 06:39
One memory of my old dads car would be 1949/50 he had a Ford V8 Pilot painted in matt green, which I found out much later was called drab olive, no seat belts in those days I had to stand in the foot well to see over the dash board, it seemed to have a really nice engine noise and very comfy seats, I have never seen one on the road since then, after that he had an Austin truck with a hole in the roof over the pax seat, which was a wizz to just get my head through when he was driving.
This thread is really waking up my old brain cells, I can remember a street party in Bolton that must have been the Coronation of our Queen..!

Barksdale Boy
27th Jul 2016, 06:47
Perhaps the street party was held to commemorate the award of an honorary doctorate to Sam Allardyce by the University of Bolton.

Peter-RB
27th Jul 2016, 09:36
It wasn'y a Uni then, it was the Bolton Institute and Night school allied to the Barlow Institue, they didn't do grand titles in those days,.....
but in the late 50's my now deceased Uncle was a student there (part time) to study Textile manufacturing and machinery, thats when Cotton was King, the UK was busy under the Labour Government showing the rest of the uneducated World on the Indian Subcontinent how to manufacture cloth from the raw material they grew, that was the start of the decline in the of the British Textile industry,
Bolton Wanderers Club was at Burnden Park nestled between three railways lines with the only star of the time being Nat Lofthouse..he was paid 50 shillings a week in those days the rest of the team did it for the pleasure of playing..!:ok:

Tankertrashnav
27th Jul 2016, 23:50
My older brother always wanted a V8 pilot Peter, but the nearest he got was an Austin 16, which wasn't quite the same. Here's a nice one, have a listen to it when it starts up!

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=Ford+V8+pilot&rlz=1C1CAFB_enGB603GB603&espv=2&biw=1366&bih=667&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiV-saV25TOAhXJIsAKHYtjDAEQsAQIKg&dpr=1#imgrc=Ffe4aAIqLbSDAM%3A

Yamagata ken
28th Jul 2016, 12:30
Late 1958 my family returned to the UK from Australia (first time for me, I was 6 and born in Oz). Lots of memories from the 4 weeks sailing (Strathnaver). We landed at Southampton and travelled to London, small hotel for the first night.

That first night (late December) I went out into the front yard/street. The sky was black. Silently drifting from the blackness into the lamp-light and onto the ground was a cascade of monster snowflakes. Magic squared. I've loved snow ever since and love it now despite it being such a trial in my heavy snow area.

vctenderness
28th Jul 2016, 15:57
As a child I remember being told by other slightly older children never to eat pomegranate as they were the cause of appendicitis!

I to this day never eat them.

Rossian
28th Jul 2016, 17:20
...I used to spend summer holidays on my uncle's farm in Aberdeenshire and he had one.

Friday was market day in Aberdeen, so off we'd go bright and early. He'd take me to the dining room and brief the ladies that I was to be well fed and he'd settle up later.

After a day of total freedom (including the slaughter house next door (I had a strong stomach)) about half past four we'd set off on the 25 mile journey home with he being very well lubricated.

The straight road out of town was punctuated with roundabouts with the tram tracks going straight across. He didn't "hold" with roundabouts. He needed to fire up his pipe so I was instructed to "hold the wheel and never mind wi' these bloody things". This involved carving off a plug of Mitchell's XXX bogey roll, much rubbing between hands and tamping into the pipe. Matches were struck and large clouds of smoke billowed around me as I tried to keep in the tram tracks.
How we never hit anything I have no idea but there was a lot of hooting behind us.

How he (and I) survived was a miracle, but he was apparently blessed by someone as he was never ever done for drink driving.

His opinion of the V8 Pilot was that it would "pass anything apart from a petrol pump".

They really were happy days for me I was only 9; it was only later in life that I realised just how bloody dangerous it all was. But I'm still here.

The Ancient Mariner