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rans6andrew
21st Jul 2016, 23:34
At the beginning of the week and due to the wonder of modern local anaesthetics I had the dubious pleasure of being able to watch a surgeon cut into my abdomen to remove a dodgy looking mole. All painlessly after the initial injection of anaesthetic. This was not the first time I have had this type of operation but it is the first one in a position that I can see. Fascinating and sort of surreal at the same time. Just keeping my fingers crossed that it turns out to be harmless when the lab tests it.

oldpax
22nd Jul 2016, 00:41
Yes, watching a camera travel round your heart arteries was also a surreal experience !Local where the catheter went in and a tranquilser!!Strange experience,had it twice .Oh yes and an MRI when a dye is injected which gives you an instant hot flush from top to bottom in seconds!!!

lomapaseo
22nd Jul 2016, 01:07
Had them all. No longer interested in listening for an oops!! or "come see this"!! to another doctor assisting.

They do vary in the level of drug so don't plan on watching, but do plan on waking up in another room

Hydromet
22nd Jul 2016, 04:36
Had a granuloma removed from my eyeball under a local anaesthetic a couple of weeks ago. Wonders of modern science. Painless, stress free, even without sedation.

Nervous SLF
22nd Jul 2016, 04:44
I had a local when they put a camera down my throat - never again it was horrible
and if I ever need it again it will be a general. Mind you I am a bit of a coward when
it comes to having operations.:O

rjtjrt
22nd Jul 2016, 05:54
Anaesthesia, both general and local, are something we (many of us) in modern society have become complacent about.
It is one of the miracles we should all be eternally grateful we have, especially General Anaesthesia.

G-CPTN
22nd Jul 2016, 06:13
Anaesthesia, both general and local, are something we (many of us) in modern society have become complacent about.
It is one of the miracles we should all be eternally grateful we have, especially General Anaesthesia.
And I believe that they really don't know how anaesthesia works.

Peter-RB
22nd Jul 2016, 06:19
Surreal is just the word, I once had a spinal block so that a surgeon could remove a thumb nail sized sliver of high speed steel from the very centre of my left Calf muscle, I never felt the sliver gong into my shin and burying itself deep in my calf,..but the resultant bright red line going up my leg and into my groin about 16- 20 days later indicated some problem, the x-ray found a line which indicated the entry and path of travel...seemingly said red line(poison) was creating the urgency, so due to a shortage of doctors they asked could they give me the block, after I agreed, they said I could watch the preceedings. it was very interesting to watch a scalpel and probes delving deep into my calf from the shin side to locate said razor sharp sliver of HSS (high Speed Steel) I didn't feel a thing until about 4 hours later when I was at home with a leg throbbing like a 30 litre diesel engine..:ooh:

ChrisVJ
22nd Jul 2016, 06:29
I went to have a thingy poked up my thingy to scrape out the inside of my prostate.

"Would you like a lcal or a general?" the surgeon asked.

"Can I watch if I have a local"

"Sure. We'll just give you a tiny sedative to start with."

Woke up an hour later just as he was finished.

"You missed it," he said.

G-CPTN
22nd Jul 2016, 06:48
I have had several 'endoscopy' procedures under the influence of memory drugs that, apparently leave you alert and aware during the operation but then wipe the memory.

For the first one I emerged from the theatre and gave a full verbal account to my wife of what had happened, then, after a brief sleep awoke and denied of all knowledge the events.

For subsequent operations I was unaccompanied, but I have absolutely no recall of any intrusive activity.

Apparently (or so I was told) the drug administered is a derivative of valium.

handsfree
22nd Jul 2016, 07:29
Of late a kidney biopsy, skin biopsy and a cystoscopy, all done
with the aid of a local and I can honestly say that all three
procedure were painless if a little uncomfortable.
The problem starts when the local wears off :uhoh:

VP959
22nd Jul 2016, 07:45
Anaesthesia, both general and local, are something we (many of us) in modern society have become complacent about.
It is one of the miracles we should all be eternally grateful we have, especially General Anaesthesia.
This seems true, and yet gets little or no publicity.

As an example, I had a "keyhole surgery" hernia repair around 20 years ago, when the procedure was still very new here. The surgery was fine, just a bit of mild discomfort for a few days. The after effects of the general anaesthetic were something else. They kept me in hospital for 48 hours then sent me home, with the warning that the general anaesthetic would probably leave me feeling a bit rough for a day or two (it did - it felt like I'd done 10 rounds with Mike Tyson).

Three years ago I had to go in and have the same operation again (the other side this time - should have done both sides the first time). I was admitted at 08:00 on a Saturday morning, had the surgery around 09:30, was out of theatre and back in a ward by 11:00 and my wife picked me up to take me home at around 14:00. As far as I could tell there were no after effects from the general anaesthetic at all; I was waiting for them (based on my previous experience), but I felt generally fine, just a bit sore. Even though I'd been told not to drive for a week (an instruction I followed), I felt perfectly well enough to drive after three of four days.

I can only assume that the balance of drugs they use when giving a general has changed, and they are now more able to give you just enough to knock you out, without overdoing it so you suffer after effects.

Tankertrashnav
22nd Jul 2016, 10:30
I was given the option of an epidural prior to an operation to repair damage to my urethra which had occurred during an operation to remove a bladder cancer. It turned out to be a terrifying experience. The doctor injecting my spine seemed really nervous, breathing hard and saying things like "can you feel anything, is that ok?" etc. The op itself went ok, although it was very odd seeing my legs up in stirrups when my brain was telling me they were still flat on the operating table. After it was done and I was in recovery I had a total panic, as I lay there still unable to move my legs, wondering if he had buggered it up and I was going to be permanently paralysed. Huge feeling of relief when sensation gradually returned. I vowed then I'd opt for a general next time, if given a choice.

sidevalve
22nd Jul 2016, 11:20
A doctor friend once told me that general anaesthesia is the closest we ever get to death.. One of those comments I wish I'd never heard!

Loose rivets
22nd Jul 2016, 11:31
The issue is, can it be dangerous to have a general anesthetic? When offered a local for retinal eye surgery I was dumbstruck. Not for long. I questioned the surgeon closely about 'generals' and finally he said wherever possible, don't have them. Much more work for the hospital as well. I had the back of my eye worked on while listening to the general chatter in the room.

"It's coming off, (scar tissue over my fovea) but in small pieces."

Trying to see around the air bubble for days was kind of trying.


Had several endoscopes, from both ends, and never any calming stuff. Last time, looking for Gluten Celiac gut sample, I wondered if I'd made a mistake when a 40-ish year old bloke came out with the most horrendous look of distressed misery on his face. I lay down and nursey put on a latex glove and clapped her hand over my mouth, tight around the pipe, and then pulled me tight into her bosom clamping me there for the next quarter of an hour.

I was trollied out with a silly grin on my face.

blue up
22nd Jul 2016, 11:44
I had a an epidural and spinal block when they went exploring round a spinal injury. They gave me the memory-wipe drugs so I have no recollection of the Op. For the next stage which involved a 12 inch cut up the back, removal of the rear of 3 vertebrae and insertion of lots of metalwork I was obviously going to out cold so I asked if I could have one of the staff take occasional photos. I ended up with 40+ clear colour photos of my spinal cord surrounded by metal and what looked like Chilli con carne.
The team like to get photos so they can use them for teaching so it is always worth asking, so long as the camera is clean.

One of our pilots showed me the photos of his haemorrhoid Op. Think 'Close-up shotgun wound'. :yuk:

Ascend Charlie
22nd Jul 2016, 11:49
Had a general prior to prostate surgery - the anaesthetist rigged up my wrist with the little tube and as he injected the Good Stuff, he said

"You are about to have a Miley Cyrus moment!" - and all went black.

yellowtriumph
22nd Jul 2016, 11:49
I have had several 'endoscopy' procedures under the influence of memory drugs that, apparently leave you alert and aware during the operation but then wipe the memory.

For the first one I emerged from the theatre and gave a full verbal account to my wife of what had happened, then, after a brief sleep awoke and denied of all knowledge the events.

For subsequent operations I was unaccompanied, but I have absolutely no recall of any intrusive activity.

Apparently (or so I was told) the drug administered is a derivative of valium.
Yes, I've had the same thing. Fully compliant, conversant and alert during the 'inspection' but the drug stops the brain from making memories from the moment of application until it wears off. Sounds like a variation of yours? Brilliant stuff.

G-CPTN
22nd Jul 2016, 12:10
Yes, I've had the same thing. Fully compliant, conversant and alert during the 'inspection' but the drug stops the brain from making memories from the moment of application until it wears off. Sounds like a variation of yours? Brilliant stuff.
Apparently, the drugs used are 'abused' as date-rape drugs.

david1300
22nd Jul 2016, 12:37
I went to have a thingy poked up my thingy to scrape out the inside of my prostate.

"Would you like a lcal or a general?" the surgeon asked.

"Can I watch if I have a local"

"Sure. We'll just give you a tiny sedative to start with."

Woke up an hour later just as he was finished.

"You missed it," he said.

That sounds like a great outcome :ok: I'm not keen on watching people cut me up or do other things to me either :p

Yamagata ken
22nd Jul 2016, 13:04
Eternally grateful for the 7 hour general I had earlier this year. No discomfort or pain from the operation. I woke up in a panic of claustrophobia and had to be held down. The only post-op problems I had was soreness in the buttocks from being 7 hours in one position on my back and unexplained pain in my right shoulder. Both now gone. Genuinely ''your life in their hands''. Thanks medics.

Martin the Martian
22nd Jul 2016, 13:08
Back in my nursing days I worked on a cardiac day unit, assisting in a number of procedures including trans-oesophageal echocardiograms (TOEs) in which an echo device is inserted down the oesophagus to take a close look at blood flow through the heart. The sedation normally used is midazolam, which is a member of the benzodiazepine family, which does indeed include valium (diazepam) and are commonly used in date rapes.

The only problem with receiving sedation for that type of procedure was that, understandably, the patient would often attempt to (sleepily) resist having a tube put down their throat. As it was my responsibility to administer the drug, keep their head in the right position and make sure they were comfortable, I would be the one who a couple of times received a sock to the jaw. Ah well, if you can't take a joke...

More recently I had an endoscopy and a colonoscopy in one sitting, which I guess was a kind of poetic justice. I declined sedation for the endoscopy, but had some midazolam prior to the colonoscopy, which left me nicely happy while the doctor was busily going where no man had gone before.

lomapaseo
22nd Jul 2016, 14:31
The only problem with receiving sedation for that type of procedure was that, understandably, the patient would often attempt to (sleepily) resist having a tube put down their throat. As it was my responsibility to administer the drug, keep their head in the right position and make sure they were comfortable, I would be the one who a couple of times received a sock to the jaw. Ah well, if you can't take a joke...

a far bigger problem for me is the numbing stuff they give you in the mouth before the la la stuff begins to work.

You would swear that somebody has closed your windpipe and you are choking to death even before they start.

dazdaz1
22nd Jul 2016, 14:39
After a TURBT procedure in June I have been informed I had a 'Ta '(non invasive) after the removal. The tumour was classed as a Grade 3 Happy days.

ehwatezedoing
22nd Jul 2016, 15:08
I had a general to have my gall blader removed.
A little panick moment when nurse put the mask on me to dose me off.
It felt like I could not breath anymore and was going to die from lack of oxygen.
Anybody else got this kind of feeling!?


It lasted only one or two seconds as I went to sleep pretty quickly. Woke up afterward and left the hospital the same day (morning actually) very efficient!

Rossian
22nd Jul 2016, 15:42
.....my B-i-L after his open chest multiple by-pass had hideous nightmares of giant spiders and cockroach-y things coming for him. It took five nurses to pin him down and the string of obscenities could be heard in downtown Exeter.
I asked my Norwegian psychiatrist mate about this and he murmured "Ah yes, post operative psychosis, very common".

Spare me that please. Because he does still remember that bit of the procedure and you can see in his eyes how traumatic it must have been.

The Ancient Mariner

lomapaseo
22nd Jul 2016, 16:26
I had a general to have my gall blader removed.
A little panick moment when nurse put the mask on me to dose me off.
It felt like I could not breath anymore and was going to die from lack of oxygen.
Anybody else got this kind of feeling!?

Yes, but you get used to it knowing that it's only seconds before lights out.

Next time count down ... it will give you something to do

G-CPTN
22nd Jul 2016, 17:46
I still recall the smell of chloroform (or was it ether?) and being asked to count in advance of removal of several teeth (due to 'crowding') - about 65 years ago.

Windy Militant
22nd Jul 2016, 18:01
Local anaesthetics - brilliant
The title of this post reminds me of a time around 1983 when I went for a filling.
As the dentist applied the Novocain to my gum there was a whoops! he'd managed to hit a vein. Fortunately for me not much was injected, but I did have to wait a couple of hours before I felt safe to ride my motorcycle home.
It was a couple of fairly mellowish hours I seem to recall in a hazy sort of way:\

NutLoose
22nd Jul 2016, 18:06
Yes, watching a camera travel round your heart arteries was also a surreal experience !Local where the catheter went in and a tranquilser!!Strange experience,had it twice .Oh yes and an MRI when a dye is injected which gives you an instant hot flush from top to bottom in seconds!!!

http://www.pprune.org/images/statusicon/user_offline.gif http://www.pprune.org/images/buttons/report.gif (http://www.pprune.org/report.php?p=9447808) http://www.pprune.org/images/buttons/quickreply.gif (http://www.pprune.org/newreply.php?do=newreply&p=9447808)Had the same, watched him popping in the stents too, flush in through the crutch, both stent procedures from the wrist.

G-CPTN
22nd Jul 2016, 18:14
Had the same, watched him popping in the stents too, flush in through the crutch, both stent procedures from the wrist.
The idea makes me cringe.

Before my first top-down endoscopy I interrupted the physician when he started to explain how they would introduce the camera - and I told him firmly that "I did not want to be there when the procedure was being done", however he insisted that I needed to be cooperative for them to succeed, so I was made to listen!

Loose rivets
22nd Jul 2016, 18:45
Date rape drug of some concern to the authorities is Zolpidem. In simple terms it works on the benzodiazepine receptors despite not being benzodiazepine. He said, sounding sure without being arsed to look it up. I had my pills taken away from me when I had my back done - an overweight nasty looking nurse took at least a dozen of my 'Zolps' and the hospital seemed unable to find me a single tablet despite getting approval. It led to one of the most miserable nights I've had. Not too much pain, but a mind that wouldn't shut down. In Texas a judge would have been asking her to explain.


A lumbar block and stuff squirted in, was done under a light sedative. I had the canular thing in and gamely settled myself in a prone position for the procedure. Before I'd had time to say Alice in Wonderland, I was there. Everything brilliantly white with magnificent crystals growing in tufts here and there. I tried to crack a joke but now words would come out. Then some of the crystals turned a dull stained colour and shortly I could see my outline like a pen drawing. Nothing in it but my vertebra. Then I felt pain - just enough to not like it, but one thing, I knew it was on the left and I was glad they'd got that right. (I was trying to avoid saying that. :suspect:

Anyway, it was done, and for some weeks my back was very much worse. Suddenly it got better, so much so that I considered delaying or cancelling the full procedure. But I didn't and now, some days, it's very good. Sometimes a bit not so good. But on a good day I can walk a couple of brisk miles and hurry up the cliff steps, 72', without much ado.

I'm fully expecting something else to fall off before long. Not that I've got long.:p

rotornut
22nd Jul 2016, 19:24
I'm not keen on watching people cut me up or do other things to me either
I agree. I had neurosurgery when they drilled a hole in my head to remove a subdural haematoma. Glad I had a general and when I came out there were no side effects.

jolihokistix
22nd Jul 2016, 20:08
They woke me up from an artificial coma to ask for permission to operate with a local anaesthetic. Better for judging patient response, they explained. 70% chance of success, and was I happy for them to go ahead? I couldn't speak so I nodded my head. Oh, and would it be all right to tie my hands and feet down, as they would only have one shot at it? They only had a limited supply of my blood type. Who, me struggle? Far too much of a gentleman. I shook my head. I have a clear memory of a doctor struggling to push a filter up a main artery to a position below my heart. Later I heard that I lost a lot of that precious blood, internally and externally.

We'll give you some shots in your crotch so this will be painless, but we need to stitch you up, the doc explained. OK, I nodded. The stitches were painless with a tugging sensation, except for the last one where I felt a sharp jab of cold pain as the needle went in, then a burning heat, a sort of rope burn as he pulled the thread right up taut. Ouch, I muttered. This area is crisscross-complicated, he explained; however much we inject you, there will always be sections which get missed out. Then why TF did you say there would be no pain, I thought?

Such small details pale into insignificance compared to the overall excellent job they did. Full of gratitude and admiration for the doctors and nurses and what they do.

air pig
22nd Jul 2016, 20:26
Surgeon I knew of the cardiac variety always had a running battle with the anesthetists about sedation for patients. He would have been more at home in the pre anesthetic days when they just tied the patient down and got on with the job. He believed that anesthesia dropped the B/P too far and being more awake kept it up by the body liberating adrenaline and nor-adrenaline.

Had personal experience of both general and local anesthesia, general offt o sleep and woke up without a problem, local twice in the past few years for upper GI scoping, first time small dose of Midazolam, rememebr seeing the room but not the procedure or people. Second time no sedation just anaesthetic, my choice, far different experience but when the scope was inside reminded me of John Hurt in Alien.

lomapaseo
22nd Jul 2016, 20:29
Forget about the anaesthetics, it's the oddest feelings when they reverse a procedure without the need for anaesthetics.

examples

pulling a drain tube out of your belly or bladder. wholy crap does that feel weird

or pulling pins out of bones with a slide hammer.

But it's really not that bad compared to waking up outta of your mind after being put out for hours after a major operation

Null Orifice
22nd Jul 2016, 21:04
Had an epidural for my knee replacement a couple of years ago.
The nice man who sticks needles in people talked me into it (the epidural) with the promise that (a) I would be out of hospital in 3 days, rather than the 5 days if I had a general and (b) he also said I wouldn't have any after effects. He was right on both counts!
I can't pretend that it was particularly pleasant having the needle inserted in my back, but the rather nice nurse who held my hand was a thankful distraction.
The op itself was a surreal experience; background music by Coldplay and The Beatles (the surgeon's choice, not mine - they said they didn't do requests!). The surgeon and his assistant were obviously keen cricket fans from the sub-continent (it being 'closed season' in UK) and they kept asking one of the theatre staff for updates on the score - I wasn't aware of which two countries were playing, they just referred to 'us' reaching 77 for 1 at some point.
Interspersed with the cricket score updates and the background music, I was also entertained by the sound of power tools being used, unfelt and unseen by me due to the cloth screen that spoiled the view.
Apart from a few specks of blood (mine!!) appearing on the cloth screen, I saw little of the actual operation apart from a partial reflection on the rim of the theatre light wherein I caught an occasional, tantalising glimpse of some of the tools being used; among these was a large hammer that was used to 'technically tap' the femural component of the implant into position. This resulted in my body jerking upwards with each hammer blow but with no sensation other than that of floating on a water-bed.
The sound of what seemed like hundreds of staples being inserted in my knee signalled the impending close of play; a voice announced that the job was finished in 63 minutes - not sure how that rates, in surgical terms. The epidural began to wear off in a couple of hours, just like the man said!
My admiration to the doctors, nurses and physios who got me mobile again, and thanks to the NHS for giving me my new knee. I know I'll never play football again but who cares? After all, I am in my mid-70s :)

ShyTorque
22nd Jul 2016, 22:13
I wish they'd offered me an anaesthetic of any sort when they decided they needed to put a camera in my bladder. There's only only one way in and out and I can honestly say it was the most painful thing I've ever experienced.

Nervous SLF
22nd Jul 2016, 22:38
When I had a few generals many years ago I had weird feelings and sounds in my ears when coming around.
I mentioned this at the time but no real explanation was given. Fast forward 20 years and I had to have more
generals so I mentioned this and was told don't worry we use different stuff these days. No after effects
were suffered thank goodness. However I have to admit that I am tad naughty as instead of counting
backwards when the first needle goes in I always say "goodbye cruel world". You should see the staffs reaction
but of course you have to be quick before it all goes black :):)

lomapaseo
23rd Jul 2016, 01:02
and they always start off trying to confirm they have the right patient and correct procedure to be done.

check and double check.

So while I lay on the cold slab some face leans over me with a clip board and asks what am I here for today.

I replied a Penis implant

so they went looking for the big guy who wheeled me down from the upper floors as I blacked out

FullOppositeRudder
23rd Jul 2016, 01:36
I've had four general anaesthetic procedures in the past 18 months as part of my PC adventure, and another more recently for a hernia repair. Happily they all went well, and I simply woke up from a good sleep, apparently without embarrassment to myself or the wonderful staff at the hospital. Most recently I had cataract surgery on one eye - that was a partial knock-out - again all went well. I was a aware of someone maintaining a steady touch on my right hand for the duration of the event; perhaps it was the rather attractive anaesthetist - I'd like to think so anyway .....

These outcomes are a huge improvement from general procedures earlier in my lifetime when they used 'gas' or ether / chloroform. I threw up for almost a day after each one of these, bad enough in itself, but complicated to a painfully serious degree following the appendix removal back in 1969 :(.

FOR

India Four Two
23rd Jul 2016, 02:19
I had an epidural/spinal block when my broken ankle was operated on.

A very interesting experience. I had to sit up on the operating table while an anesthetist inserted a long needle into my spine. Shortly afterwards, I had no feeling whatsoever from the waist down.

After the operation, as the anesthetic wears off, feeling comes back progresssively in the order that the nerves branch off the lower spine. So gradually sensation came back into my legs as the lumbar and sacral nerves became unblocked. However one of the last nerves to come back into play is the pudendal nerve.

So for quite a while, everything felt fine, except an important part of my anatomy which was completely without feeling. Very worrying while it lasted! :eek:

wakefield
23rd Jul 2016, 09:30
Had two skin cancers removed from the opening of my ear canal. Very strange listening to the sound of the scalpel slicing away. Happily did not feel a thing!

Hydromet
23rd Jul 2016, 10:01
Had a tiny skin cancer removed from my eyeball - didn't even realise they could grow there. They gave me the sedation while they injected a block behind the eyeball, then woke me up to do the operation. Interesting to hear them talking, see the instruments coming in and hear & smell the diathermy, all while feeling nothing.

Loose rivets
23rd Jul 2016, 23:06
when I was about 19 I finally plucked up courage to have my tonsils out. I'd been afraid of losing control of my mind, not the cut of the scalpel.

"Hold me down by my throat, I'm used to that." I can still hear the words in my mind. Goodness knows what they thought.

I'd been a judo fanatic for some time and of course a lot of judo is strangles and chokes. The former could be totally disabling in a moment while the latter was simply annoying.

One of our club members was a German girl of about 18. She was 8" shorter than me and medium build. "Watch her, she's good at strangles."

"Yeh, yeh. But just a girlie." Thinks I.

"Hajime!" I recall hearing . . . just before the lights went out. I found myself kneeling in front of her.

In the same way, we had a diminutive first dan that I found hard to believe gained that status (not many of them in those days) But he had won every contest with a strangle hold. I thought I could manage him with no trouble but again in a moment the room faded from view.

The point of this is, if some kid can render you unconscious by gripping your collar and rolling the sternomastoid muscles clear of the carotid arteries and applying pressure to the latter, why the Bloody blue blazes did we ever have to go through the first moments of gas? Surely a kindly strangle followed by whatever, and it would be a free lunch - providing oxygen was back in the brain within a couple of minutes.

blue up
24th Jul 2016, 11:37
When I snapped the Volar Plate and Intercostal Ligaments in both thumbs during a car crash I could fold my thumbs flat against my wrists. To fix them they drill the length of the thumb bones and insert pairs of thick stainless rods called K-Wires.

When the repairs were all done they remove the wires. I turned up early and the Doc said the tools hadn't been delivered yet. Upon asking what sort of tools they needed I mentioned that I had a Leatherman pocket tool in my bag. "That'll do!" Very weird watching a 4+ inch rod being pulled out of your thumbs, accompanied by a sound reminiscent of a wine bottle cork being removed. No drugs required because there are no nerves involved so you just sit there as he pulls the wires out like giant splitpins.

Got some lovely pics of the repair operation...

http://i82.photobucket.com/albums/j279/foggythomas/thumbrepair1a-1.jpg (http://s82.photobucket.com/user/foggythomas/media/thumbrepair1a-1.jpg.html)

G-CPTN
24th Jul 2016, 12:16
I'm afraid that I cannot bear to watch that.

Strange - I was first on the scene of a collision between a pedestrian and a car where the pedestrian was 'scalped' by the header rail of the front windscreen - but I was able to remain cool and dial 999 and request a doctor in addition to an ambulance (this was 50 years ago before paramedics, when ambulance drivers were just that).

RedhillPhil
25th Jul 2016, 00:38
I almost lost my left ear lobe in an accident about five years ago. Three injections of local prior to stitching it back had absolutely no effect so nursey in A&E at NESH said, "you'll just have to grit your teeth, I can't give you any more and if I give it 24 hours so you can have more the earlobe probably won't take back on". So I just gritted my teeth.
The pain was exquisite.

Loose rivets
26th Jul 2016, 23:10
I steeled myself to stop at a road accident at Frinton Gates, c 1970. It was pub turning out time and the traffic was pretty active - and not well driven. There was no other car involved but the four young people were in various states, one lying in the middle of the dimly lit road. I got the Rivetess to park astride the white line and flash the headlights at every car coming around the bend 200 yards away. It worked.

I could see right into the girl's neck. Pipes, blood vessels, and things I knew little about. There was no major bleeding although my suede jacket was soon soaked.

Then followed the longest 25 minutes of my life. I made one huge mistake: I assumed death in once case because of the lake of blood. Very, very wrong. I was told there were no fatalities, but to this day I'm not totally sure.

Years later I felt sure I saw the girl working in Schiphol Airport. I would love to have talked to her but what could I say? I knew the victim was Dutch, and this one was the right height and build. The scarring at once identified her and barred an enquiry. I looked at her from afar and remembered her words that remarkably, could still be uttered. "I want to go home." Even with that damaged neck I could recognise the accent.

With my drinking jacket off I was kind of in uniform. People did pretty much what I asked them to. Strange thing, uniforms.

Hydromet
26th Jul 2016, 23:13
People did pretty much what I asked them to. Strange thing, uniforms.
Back when I first started as an apprentice >50 years ago, I remember reading of an accident/incident, where pax wouldn't do what cabin crew instructed, until a steward put his cap on. Then they recognised his authority.

Wyler
28th Jul 2016, 10:58
Had spinal blocks for both hip replacements. Also added some sedation so no memory of the Op and no side effects.
Was told to expect some discomfort after the Op.
No kidding!!!! First week only tolerated with large doses of liquid Morphine and Tramadol :ok:

rans6andrew
28th Jul 2016, 13:47
I had to pop down to the local GP surgery today to have my stitches removed. Or, to be more precise, have the remaining stitch removed. Since Monday evening the stitches have been getting looser because the knot at the end of the blanket stitch pattern had worked it's way undone and by this morning I was down to just one tight stitch and a couple of loose loops with an end sticking out. I was in two minds about troubling the nurse, I could have snipped the remaining stitch out and pulled the ends through for myself.

Er Indoors offered to get a needle from her sewing kit and put them all back in to make my visit worthwhile! The nurse was amused as well.

tartare
29th Jul 2016, 04:49
Two years ago, somewhere in North Sydney.
In the nets, with Master Tartare pitching a googly at me.
Take smart-arse hook shot.
I rotates beautifully through 90 degrees, lovely follow through.
And suddenly falls on my back.
Looked down to see that while I'd turned, my right foot had not and was now rotated 45 degrees and pointing sideways from my calf.
No `crack' - nothing. Just an intense burning pain.
What's known as a Stage 3 rotational internal fracture of the tib and fib.
From bloody cricket!
Anyways - to get back on thread, just before they put me under to straighten the bastard out (before installing a plate and fourteen screws) I says to the bloke at the head of the table "Right - I'm going to try and be conscious of the precise moment the anaesthetic puts me under."
He simply smiles behind the mask, and pushes the syringe plunger.
A kind of ice-cold feeling moves halfway up my forearm - and a second later - I kid you not - I'm in recovery!
How the hell does it work?
They still don't really know - do they?
Something to do with making brain cell walls more permeable I seem to remember reading somewhere... but that's about the extent of knowledge I believe.

Rosevidney1
29th Jul 2016, 22:50
I had 2 ops last week for a malignant carcinoma. The first was with a local anaesthetic which I found to be quite painful when the first few injections took place. After that I didn't feel a thing. The second op was with a general anaesthetic which I much preferred. If I get the choice again I will definitely opt for a general. I was informed today that the last biopsy showed all was clear so I'm a happy old bunny!