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Effluent Man
18th Jul 2016, 09:11
I have not done a manual job since I was 19. Recently I bought a cottage with a decent garden plot and a large double garage. The previous owner did car repairs, it's a pretty little Suffolk village. I got planning consent on the side garden for a new 3 bed cottage.

Over the past month I have done an awful lot of manual work, clearing the site, demolishing the garage and removing all the debris. I cleaned 2500 bricks from the garage to use below DPC. I must say that I have felt as fit.

Kulverstukas
18th Jul 2016, 09:26
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:ok:
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charliegolf
18th Jul 2016, 09:45
Building my own house remains one of the most satisfying (and financially astute) things I have ever done.
Land, 0.3 acres £26k
Build, all in £54k
Build time to move-in, 17 weeks.
Main failure: too financially conservative at the time.

1995 prices!

CG

Loose rivets
18th Jul 2016, 10:15
You pulled down a large garage that you could have fettled cars in??!! Aaaaaaaagh.

tartare
18th Jul 2016, 10:17
Well done sir.
There's something about rolling up your sleeves and embarking on a major physical project, regardless of age.
Using new tools, learning how to do new things, teaching yourself different techniques and skills.
Very affirming... reminds one of one's essential blokishness... much under valued in this day and age.
Where's that power-drill...

yellowtriumph
18th Jul 2016, 11:05
Similarly we live in a development of flats in London. There is a website where residents communicate with each other . More often than not it is full of requests from fellow residents asking how to do this that and the other ranging from sorting out plumbing problems to how to replace their smoke and heat detectors.

An as over 60 I get of lot of pleasure from assisting my mainly young (and largely impractical) neighbours to solve their problems. There's much pleasure to be had in passing down the knowledge we've all built up over the years to the next generation - much the same as it was at work. I'm sure you'll all agree.

PDR1
18th Jul 2016, 11:40
You pulled down a large garage that you could have fettled cars in??!! Aaaaaaaagh.

Indeed - now you have to put up with the wife's continual whining about having the lathes and the mill in the sitting room...

PDR

Yamagata ken
18th Jul 2016, 12:45
I'm 64. You'll get my shed/workshop (aka double garage) out of my hands when I'm dead. I'm not planning on that happening soon.

G-CPTN
18th Jul 2016, 13:00
When I was looking for my first house, my brief was 'a large garage with a small cottage attached'.

oldpax
18th Jul 2016, 13:15
i live in a village where everone grows rice and I am happy to watch them do so!!

Loose rivets
18th Jul 2016, 14:41
I could move fast up to 55 years old. Here I'm adding a tad of height and a pitched roof to a dormer I'd built 25 years before.

Can you believe regs now prohibit the use of old wood for rafters? Much of this wood is the high spec from the last job.

Got the roof off and back on in a week by myself. Had to really move to catch the weather. Never needed the tarps.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v703/walnaze/Building%20and%20buildings/Madcarpenterlow.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/walnaze/media/Building%20and%20buildings/Madcarpenterlow.jpg.html)


On the Texas house things were easy. Route from garage changed and a utill cupboard put in the space, then this dining server alcove plus walk in pantry. Total cost with toughened glass shelves less than 500 bucks.



http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v703/walnaze/Home/Centre%20Units%201_zpsgsg9p6qj.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/walnaze/media/Home/Centre%20Units%201_zpsgsg9p6qj.jpg.html)


Don't know what happened - posting second pic wiped the first. Never happened before.

Loose rivets
18th Jul 2016, 15:08
However, a word of warning. In the last photo I was in my 70's and slowing down a lot. It meant the mess lasted longer and I noticed the Rivetess, rather than pitch in was tending to spend time on the other side of the Atlantic. The novelty of DIY had probably worn off 20 years before.

Now as many of you know, she refuses to live under the same roof. I can't imagine why. :\

Not that she didn't pitch in, in the old days. I came back from a flight one night to find 3" hoses hanging out of a bedroom window. she'd tacked plastic bags as funnels to port the rain out from a roof that was half built. Not my fault this time as I was paying a carpenter more than I earned as a pilot, and still the F:mad: wouldn't turn up unless he felt like it.

Oh, and one time I came home and she'd hired a full size road drill and a compressor as long as a car. 'I'm so tired I can't lift the drill out of the hole' says she. But . . . but, I only said use your initiative and get rid of that oversite - not drill it up yourself.

301 sq feet 4" thick that :mad: Readymix had forgotten to put the sand in.

So, things don't always go right, and wives don't always stay the distance, though 50 years is I suppose, not bad. (She's just left, so I have to say nice things in case she reads in.):}

er340790
18th Jul 2016, 17:00
I got planning consent on the side garden for a new 3 bed cottage.


Well, there's your retirement funded!!! :D :ok:

Effluent Man
18th Jul 2016, 17:16
The way I spend money probably even if I live to get the telegram from King Billy.

hiflymk3
18th Jul 2016, 17:23
Just spent today, (hottest of the year so far) on my hands and knees sanding floors with a 4" belt sander and helping a colleague plasterboard a ceiling in a Victorian house. I'm lucky that I still can do these things and enjoy it. And LR, it's nice to put a face to your name in those pics.

Effluent Man
18th Jul 2016, 17:29
CG, your costs are interesting, my calculations come to almost exactly double at £110 for the build. Given that it's twenty one years on I suppose that us about right.

charliegolf
18th Jul 2016, 19:19
EF, my build cost came out at about £32/sq ft. That's about £350 /sqm. Now it's about £1000-£1100 for a decent finish. How's that estimate sitting with yours? I'd have loved to do another, but my wife loves ours so much she won't hear of it unless we don't sell ours until the new one would be done! I don't have the dosh!

CG

Effluent Man
18th Jul 2016, 21:39
I am working on around £900 per square metre. The builder has given me a good quote and he has just put me onto a materials supplier whereby I get everything at cost price. Additionally I have salvaged enough bricks from the demolished garage take the new house up to damp proof course, this should save about £1500. I also intend to do all the internal decorating.

John Hill
18th Jul 2016, 22:24
When I was a mere 63 or so I decided to retire back to the old hometown so we sold our city home with the sea views and the 3 garages and moved to the small town and a new, much smaller, easier to clean, no steps, etc etc retirement house.

I had intended to take part in the building of the new house but SWMBO asserted her authority after declaring that it took me 30 years to finish the last house and just how long did I intend to be around to finish this one.

UniFoxOs
19th Jul 2016, 06:43
70 years old, building my retirement bungalow by extending a much smaller one to about double its size. Couple of years of building work so far - new walls outside the old ones, old roof off and new roof on. Property now watertight and installing floors. Was expecting to be in for Christmas but we'll see.

Pace
19th Jul 2016, 08:03
Can we please remove that word "retirement " from the dictionary ? It is the most negative word I know and conjures up a picture of old age, being put out to grass, end of your useful life, waiting for God
With people working longer and longer having multiple partners and many heading off into new business ventures of their own please guys don't use that word
Mick Jagger is running around at the age of 73 with a 29 year pregnant girlfriend
Ok he has the dough to be a play dad
But get my gist ? Do not be a retirement guy you just change your life direction

DirtyProp
19th Jul 2016, 08:28
Can we please remove that word "retirement " from the dictionary ? It is the most negative word I know and conjures up a picture of old age, being put out to grass, end of your useful life, waiting for God
With people working longer and longer having multiple partners and many heading off into new business ventures of their own please guys don't use that word
Mick Jagger is running around at the age of 73 with a 29 year pregnant girlfriend
Ok he has the dough to be a play dad

And no conscience whatsoever, it seems.
That is utterly gross. :yuk:
Where are the raging feminists when you need'em?

Pace
19th Jul 2016, 09:27
From her point of view he will probably purchase her a $3 to 5 million home hers till the kid is 18 and give her an annual payment far in excess of what she could dream of making herself
Her other option get together with a 32 year old, get pregnant and end up as a single mum on
Benefits so maybe quite a calculated clever decision by her

He has already said they will lead seperate lives so from his side he has all the benefits of being a play dad without the commitment and a pretty young thing to jump in bed with him when he's in town
As for feminists ? In our society where anything goes gay men old with young, transvestites and all the other combinations imagine able why the discrimination against an old guy with a young woman ? She is 29 ! Hardly a 16 year old and fully responsible for her own decisions
Having a Mick Jagger baby as was put in the media is a bit like having a Gucci handbag for some women and with that comes the financial and security benefits with a touch of fame
A win win for both it would seem? He gets what he wants she gets what she wants

hiflymk3
19th Jul 2016, 16:41
So there you go, Mick hasn't retired and look what he gets. There's hope for us all.

UniFoxOs
19th Jul 2016, 17:09
Well I was hoping that, like old racehorses, I'd be put out to stud, but it seems less likely each year.

DirtyProp
19th Jul 2016, 17:29
From her point of view he will probably purchase her a $3 to 5 million home hers till the kid is 18 and give her an annual payment far in excess of what she could dream of making herself
Her other option get together with a 32 year old, get pregnant and end up as a single mum on
Benefits so maybe quite a calculated clever decision by her



My point exactly.
Having a baby from a rich, famous rockstar is nothing more than a great business proposition for way too many young, hot chicks.
So much for women rights and emancipation and the usual crapola spewed by the raging fems...

Ok, no more OT.
Back to "Old Farts can still be useful!" Program.

hiflymk3
19th Jul 2016, 19:33
On a hot day like today and sanding floors again, I don't feel fit enough to be put out to stud. The knackers yard is all I'm fit for.

Effluent Man
19th Jul 2016, 19:46
Just finished chain sawing up an oak tree and loading it into my mate's van. It's back to about 20c here now, just waiting for the full moon to rise then a walk round the village ending with a well earned pint at The Star.

Cazalet33
19th Jul 2016, 20:17
Don't wait for the fekkin moon, man.

Just neck the pint.

SpringHeeledJack
19th Jul 2016, 20:32
I remember some years back that the NAAI (?) governing body of insurers in the USA, had a statistic that the average corporate warrior who retired at 65 lived for 3 more years. The crazy thing being that 'they' had probably worked and saved and dreamt of and for their golden years, and then boom, gone before any real enjoyment was had. Life back then was linear for most, but the main reason was lack of purpose, which led to a mentality of being of no use, which led to the organism shutting down, either gradually, or swiftly. Statistically, those who had retired earlier through planning, good fortune, or mild illness lived longest. This seemed to be primarily due to them getting other interests that gave a sense of purpose that…..kept the organism ticking along for many more fruitful years.

Modern life is much easier physically than for our forefathers, though conversely more difficult psychologically and the consequent debilitating stress that ensues. The human body is capable of much at a later stage in life, as attested in this thread, and as long as one is mindful of limitations in strength and flexibility, 'hard' manual labour is possible. To do such things gives much satisfaction, we were designed to do such things. Bravo to all!

charliegolf
19th Jul 2016, 21:36
On a hot day like today and sanding floors again, I don't feel fit enough to be put out to stud. The knackers yard is all I'm fit for.

Why aren't you using a 12" drum sander?

ShyTorque
19th Jul 2016, 21:59
However, a word of warning. In the last photo I was in my 70's and slowing down a lot. It meant the mess lasted longer and I noticed the Rivetess, rather than pitch in was tending to spend time on the other side of the Atlantic. The novelty of DIY had probably worn off 20 years before.

Now as many of you know, she refuses to live under the same roof. I can't imagine why. :\

Not that she didn't pitch in, in the old days. I came back from a flight one night to find 3" hoses hanging out of a bedroom window. she'd tacked plastic bags as funnels to port the rain out from a roof that was half built.:}
Yes, well you should have put the tiles back on it....

hiflymk3
19th Jul 2016, 22:15
Charliegolf, I refuse to use a 12" drum sander because they rip the life out of Victorian floorboards, it makes them look like new. Prospective clients ask me the same question. When I show them pictures of my work they want the same antique look, a few imperfections like coal burns near the fireplace, even a few old scratches. It simply gives the floor a nice patina.

Krystal n chips
20th Jul 2016, 05:52
" had a statistic that the average corporate warrior who retired at 65 lived for 3 more years. The crazy thing being that 'they' had probably worked and saved and dreamt of and for their golden years, and then boom, gone before any real enjoyment was had. Life back then was linear for most, but the main reason was lack of purpose, which led to a mentality of being of no use, which led to the organism shutting down, either gradually, or swiftly. Statistically, those who had retired earlier through planning, good fortune, or mild illness lived longest. This seemed to be primarily due to them getting other interests that gave a sense of purpose that…..kept the organism ticking along for many more fruitful years.

That's a pretty good summation actually, albeit not exclusive to the corporate world.....the military encounter the same inability to make the psychological transition when retired as indeed do many who have spent their working lives with one organisation.

Thankfully, one has spent a lifetime preparing for the day when one becomes officially "old" and thus the transition will be a non event...:E....as this will be early next year, one has already commenced the planning. There is a real danger of some form of cardio vascular activity taking place and, even getting the pinkies dirty at times !.....however, this trauma will be alleviated by being able to plan ones days watching cricket and traveling .

The world , on the cheap obviously, no point in paying some of these profiteering tour company's after all, beckons.

Indian railways have a long standing appeal, as does India, and indeed, Oz/ NZ although they are expensive.

At the other end of the scale.....America ...I know, but, having been there before, and survived...one feels another visit is warranted....any suggestions would be welcome....:p

hiflymk3
20th Jul 2016, 07:43
K&C, you can always,

Rent a cottage on the Isle of Wight,
If it's not too dear,
You can scrimp and save.

Effluent Man
20th Jul 2016, 08:19
I hear that there are 4000 holes in Blackburn, Lancashire going cheap.

hiflymk3
20th Jul 2016, 09:07
I wonder how many holes it takes to fill the Albert Hall.

yellowtriumph
20th Jul 2016, 10:53
" had a statistic that the average corporate warrior who retired at 65 lived for 3 more years. The crazy thing being that 'they' had probably worked and saved and dreamt of and for their golden years, and then boom, gone before any real enjoyment was had. Life back then was linear for most, but the main reason was lack of purpose, which led to a mentality of being of no use, which led to the organism shutting down, either gradually, or swiftly. Statistically, those who had retired earlier through planning, good fortune, or mild illness lived longest. This seemed to be primarily due to them getting other interests that gave a sense of purpose that…..kept the organism ticking along for many more fruitful years.

That's a pretty good summation actually, albeit not exclusive to the corporate world.....the military encounter the same inability to make the psychological transition when retired as indeed do many who have spent their working lives with one organisation.

Thankfully, one has spent a lifetime preparing for the day when one becomes officially "old" and thus the transition will be a non event...:E....as this will be early next year, one has already commenced the planning. There is a real danger of some form of cardio vascular activity taking place and, even getting the pinkies dirty at times !.....however, this trauma will be alleviated by being able to plan ones days watching cricket and traveling .

The world , on the cheap obviously, no point in paying some of these profiteering tour company's after all, beckons.

Indian railways have a long standing appeal, as does India, and indeed, Oz/ NZ although they are expensive.

At the other end of the scale.....America ...I know, but, having been there before, and survived...one feels another visit is warranted....any suggestions would be welcome....:p
I would thoroughly recommend South Africa. Beautiful and cheap for UK visitors, we're going again in a couple of months.

vulcanised
20th Jul 2016, 11:26
The only place in the USA that has any appeal for me is Jackson Hole, Wyoming..

https://www.seejh.com/webcams/jacksonhole/jackson/town-square-cache
.

larssnowpharter
20th Jul 2016, 15:48
Hit 65 a few months back but gave up paid full time employment at 60. Since then have:

1. project managed the construction of a 12 room guesthouse in thw Philippines that is now running successfully.

2. Moved family back to UK.

3. Started a small property development business that makes money and keeps me out of trouble.

4. Continued working for former employers (and others) as a consultant investigating accidents and unplanned 'events'.

Not on the Mick Jagger scale but Senora Lars is 20 years younger than me and getting more beautiful by the year; some ladies are like that. Our 2 children - 9 and 10 - keep me busy with school runs, homework and after school activities. I even help coach the local under 11 girls' team.

Next project is the renovation of a pile of stone sitting in a couple of hectares of olive grove in Puglia, Italy.

I wouldn't call it retirement!!

funfly
21st Jul 2016, 15:20
My philosophy is to do sod all and sit around a lot.
Highly recommended.
Not too concerned about life starting at any age, it is the finishing that is more relevant.

P.S. have you noticed how, as you grow older, you have to use the spellchecker more and more?

charliegolf
21st Jul 2016, 18:30
P.S. have you noticed how, as you grow older, you have to use the spellchecker more and more?

Kno I do knot!

broadreach
21st Jul 2016, 22:38
I began retiring at around 65 and succeeded - I think - at around 68 or 69. Projects, at least for me, are very necessary and I have two on the burners right now. Quite aware of the statistics about people kicking the bucket as soon as they've retired.

Loose rivets
21st Jul 2016, 23:04
I drove about 120 miles yesterday evening in a 150mph car - all within 3mph of the speed limits.

It's a bit like having fallen in lust with a teenager but forgetting quite why.

Effluent Man
6th Aug 2016, 19:15
My site is ready for pouring concrete to form a steel reinforced ring beam. Should take place next Wednesday. I have a sales background and I am finding the civil engineering aspect fascinating. Last week we discovered an old brick well, sadly it's right under the corner of the house so we had to fill it in.

katya2607
6th Aug 2016, 20:32
Good Evening all. "effluent man" I have an old brick well too, thankfully at the front of the house and the water was checked as "potable" 25 years ago. The brickwork is absolutely amazing, looks like new, although the house was built in 1927. Having drained it a few times whilst watering the garden, it would take 40 minutes to replenish.

My late husband thought we could use it instead of having mains brought to the property. he being of the "old school" flight crew. With me being a bit younger, all I could think of was blimey how is the dishwasher and washing machine going to cope when I need to sort out his crew shirts at short notice. We got mains water!

Fast forward 15 years from widowhood to now. "larssnowpharter" with your string on our dear old hm.gov.uk immigration.
I laughed my socks off reading about you and Mrs. Lars and the nonsense and hoops you had to traverse. I am only half way down the road you've travelled.

At the ripe old age of 63 in June 2016, am now 64, I re-married a wonderful South African aged 64 in Cape Town.
Well one couldn't believe the red tape there with the Home Affairs (I understand there is yet another change from the 6th June 2016). I've been to most of the Police Stations in the Southern Suburbs getting certified copies, having produced the originals of everything except my inside leg measurement. If anyone here is contemplating this, I would be most happy to assist, please PM me.

We married June 4 and the visa application (completed with the NHS surcharge was lodged 6 June). At the interview he was recommended by the outsourcing Visa Company to get testimonials from friends/families in the UK and South Africa to ensure this wasn't an arranged or scam marriage. Durgh at our age?! I fully expected the Home Affairs Office to request a formal letter of authorisation from our parents:-)

Husband is still awaiting a decision from the British Embassy in Pretoria as to whether a spousal visa will be issued. Like yourself, within the visa application they need to know how many rooms are my house, excluding bathrooms/toilets and kitchens, though no mention of hallways or landings!

I can appreciate there is a "script" which has to be followed on all visas, though if husband was a asylum seeker he would be met with open arms at Dover with the keys to a house and a car plus money for living and booked onto a course for English Language. Husband did the IELTS whilst here on a 6 month tourist visa, albeit a native English speaker, yet South Africa is not on the list of English speaking countries. Durgh!!

wife missing husband......

Effluent Man
6th Aug 2016, 20:49
My builder explained the ingenious method employed in constructing these old wells. Apparently a shallow hole was excavated to take a few courses of bricks. Then they dug under the bricks so that their weight caused them to sink and another course was added. They carried on in this manner until the well reached the required depth.

Hydromet
6th Aug 2016, 21:27
EM, we used exactly that method for constructing float wells for recording water levels. Nowadays, it's all done with electronics.

katya2607
6th Aug 2016, 21:42
Goodness, are East Anglian wells different in composition/construction from those in the New Forest?
Having sledge hammered off the re-inforced concrete cap, the sight to behold was amazing. Bricks at 60 degree angles, circular all the way to at least 15 feet in depth. Nowadays a metal cap so I can plop the water pump in for watering., as and when required. Unsure if it can be used with the pressure washer:-)

G-CPTN
6th Aug 2016, 21:42
My builder explained the ingenious method employed in constructing these old wells. Apparently a shallow hole was excavated to take a few courses of bricks. Then they dug under the bricks so that their weight caused them to sink and another course was added. They carried on in this manner until the well reached the required depth.
I understood the description, but how did they prevent the spoil from falling into the 'well' and was the well builder suspended on some sort of trapeze harness?

If the bricking was done before the well was 'sunk', how did they know that the well was being built in the place where the water could be found?

Bull at a Gate
6th Aug 2016, 22:48
I am another who has discovered the joys of "projects" as I transition to complete retirement from a very sedentary job. So far I have built a deck (complete with outdoor bath and shower so I can get clean under the stars), a wood shed, and a garden shed. No skills at all when I started and have taught myself as I go. I learn from my mistakes - and, believe me, I have made many.

Next project is another shed which we will call "The Office" which will be needed as place to put all my the contents of my current office at work.

I find it all immensely satisfying!

Sue Vêtements
6th Aug 2016, 23:03
Recently I bought a cottage with a decent garden plot and a large double garage. [snip] it's a pretty little Suffolk village.

That's ok, but you now have to watch out for people dying or mysteriously disappearing. Don't worry though, there's probably an old lady somewhere in the village, or a clergyman, or maybe two women one of whom has the best arse in England. They'll take care of things for you.

It took me four years to redo my bathroom, though I must point out that in those four years I also remodeled the kitchen, built a 500 ft2 deck on the back of the house and IIRC completely remodeled a rental unit. Unless it was the kitchen that took four years. It all blurs together now. We've been in this house for 16 years now and sometimes I stop and mentally list all the stuff I've done to it. That takes a while which is ok, but means that I'm making real estate mistake #1 ... becoming emotionally involved with a property. But when you've put so much of yourself into a place for so long, how can you not?

UniFoxOs
7th Aug 2016, 07:48
If the bricking was done before the well was 'sunk', how did they know that the well was being built in the place where the water could be found?

They would have used the services of a diviner.

Effluent Man
7th Aug 2016, 08:47
An interesting point. However where I live is probably no more than six metres above sea level so it's likely that the water table will be at less than that depth. Once the build is done maybe I will try my hand at well digging in the garden.

I presume the spoil would be removed in exactly the same manner as the water comes up, in a bucket on a rope.

Hydromet
7th Aug 2016, 12:07
We used to use either concrete, MSCL or Armco pipe. Digging inside the pipe, spoil was removed in a bucket. As it was removed from the edge of the hole, the pipe dropped. I'd imagine that if you were using bricks, each new course would be laid under the one above as the spoil was removed.

dsc810
7th Aug 2016, 12:59
Back in those days at the bottom they used to put an old waggon wheel with the spokes and centre knocked out to give a "stable " base.
As others said they then dug underneath from inside while piling on more bricks on the top as the entire cassion of the bricks shaft sank into the ground - helped by its increasing weight.
There is a limit of depth beyond which this is not practical as the sinking bricks tends either to go off centre or jam up against the sides and will not drop smoothly.

On mine (12 meters deep) the bottom section is made up of a just a few rows of bricks which are sandwiched between two circular rings of oak which are (presumably) bolted together at the back to give a solid block.
The subsequent bricks are then laid with no mortar round the circumference.
This "bottom sandwich" helps as the brick cassion drops down to the point where the clay starts below the sandstone aquifier and prevents the bottom rows falling into the water over time and the well collapsing from the inside/bottom up.

The other method is indeed to dig down in "lifts" of perhaps 6ft and then build up the brickwork from the bottom of the hole up to the bottom of the previous lift and then grout seal behind to bind it into the earth behind to prevent the lift brickwork sagging down while you are digging the next lift down. On these wells you can see the discontinuity in the brickwork at each lift.

My well is from the late 1800's as was just one of several wells for a large estate. When the estate was broken up in the 1920's it was used instead as water supply for a house to be built on the site.
I now use it for all garden/external watering, cleaning etc with a proper pump, pipe feed up, electric switch on a wall and outlet spout adjacent.

DType
8th Aug 2016, 08:43
When I retired at 65, I realised that I only had some 80 Munros (Scottish hills over 3000 ft) to do to complete the tally, so that kept me fit and out of mischief for a few years. Trouble was my climbing partner (3 years older) had already done all the Munros and was targetting the Corbetts (between 2500 and 3000 ft), so we ticked them off turn about. It certainly took us to some v interesting places, because the geology of Scotland is so varied. You can do the boring hills in winter when it can get quite challenging! Several overnight camping trips, mountain bike, etc., but the inflatable with outboard was NOT a success despite the tempting "easy" access by loch to some of the hills. No mobile phone signal at the back of beyond, so got a satellite beacon for emergencies, which also sends OK messages to reassure the family.
Completed them all just before 72 yo.

tartare
8th Aug 2016, 09:07
At aged 50 - Just bought a new De Walt cordless power drill.
Managed to install Ikea shelves in laundry perfectly straight and level.
Anchored to a masonry wall made of extremely aged NSW bricks I might add, gentlemen.
So far said shelves have been loaded to the max and have not pulled the house down - or extracted themselves from the wall - yet.
Madame Tartare was actually impressed for once.
I am now eyeing the wall between the study where I type this missive to you fine fellows - and the kitchen.
It begs to be removed - but has a load bearing look about it.
Slight step up from shelves I know, but...

Fareastdriver
8th Aug 2016, 09:20
I am now eyeing the wall between the study where I type this missive to you fine fellows - and the kitchen

Leave the wall there. The cooking will fog up your computer screen.

DType
13th Aug 2016, 08:16
Amazing what you can forget!
Thought I would earn a few Brownie points by upgrading the kitchen door. Found a really cheap discontinued metric size that could be cut down to my Imperial doorway. Cut it perfectly to size and tried to insert it.
The non-rectangular doorway just laughed at me.
And of course the supplier said "We told you it was discontinued, would you like the new version at 10x the price?"

funfly
15th Aug 2016, 10:54
So, I'm 78 today and plan to go out for a ride on my bike later on.
Have to admit it's battery assist but it's not a bad way to get fresh air.
Still trying to get my wife a transparent shirt as mentioned on another thread today (about wasps I think) but the thought got me all of a tizzy. Still I did have my birthday present last night :=

larssnowpharter
15th Aug 2016, 14:27
Do you have to wait until your next birthday before your wife gives you another present? Seems 'thin gruel'.:}

finfly1
15th Aug 2016, 15:46
Forties- tri weekly
Fifties - try weekly
Sixties - try weakly

G-CPTN
15th Aug 2016, 18:08
Very early in my married life, a work colleague told me that if I was to put a 'bean' into a jar every time I had sex during the first year(s) of married life, then took one out for every time in the subsequent years, then the jar would never be emptied.

I never tried it as I couldn't find enough beans . . .

UniFoxOs
16th Aug 2016, 07:49
They told me to use pins and a pincushion - but ours wasn't big enough.

Ascend Charlie
17th Aug 2016, 06:09
Filled and emptied the jar many times, had to get a second jar.