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bugg smasher
13th Jul 2016, 23:22
In view of the dumbing and gunning down of America, as has been made clear by the evident success of the Trump campaign, and the intransigence of the NRA lobby re recent events, I challenge all of the JB Illuminati to take this test. I scored a 31000 word vocabulary, with the exception of 'avulse', as in to avulse a ligament, tear apart, the antonym being 'suture'.

We don't actually know what we don't know, until someone actually asks. Only then, perhaps, can we act...

Online English Vocabulary Size Test (http://www.arealme.com/vocabulary-size-test/en/)

57mm
14th Jul 2016, 00:02
30500 for me; not bad for an airframe driver.

G0ULI
14th Jul 2016, 00:12
29625 - Seems a bit low, but I'm tired after a long day.

vapilot2004
14th Jul 2016, 01:16
http://i63.tinypic.com/rm8gt2.png

That was fun. I admit guessing on a few of the answers.

Um... lifting...
14th Jul 2016, 01:33
31K & change. Put me in the Top 0.01%. I guessed on one or two, and made an highly probable guess on 'avulse'.

ORAC
14th Jul 2016, 07:19
30500, what's the maximum?

Senior Paper Monitor
14th Jul 2016, 07:35
Err - whats an antonym thingy ?

chuks
14th Jul 2016, 07:41
29975?! I demand a re-count!

Lonewolf_50
14th Jul 2016, 08:23
30500
Had to pay attention when it switched from syn to ant. some of those words I'd not seen in years.

ImageGear
14th Jul 2016, 08:44
29800

- no GCE's, No A-Levels, No Degrees, Hey who needs 'em. :ok:

Imagegear

Pontius Navigator
14th Jul 2016, 08:54
Churchill says basic English is 1000 words.


Not sure about participles and declensions.

4mastacker
14th Jul 2016, 09:15
22950 for me, but there again, my first language is Geordie.

Carry0nLuggage
14th Jul 2016, 09:21
bugg smasher: Avulse - thanks for that :ok:

Loose rivets
14th Jul 2016, 09:25
Mmmm . . . 3015, and several uncertainty-moments. Bum, as a wannabe writer, I didn't feel all that good about it. I'm at the age where science tells us our vocabulary is at its zenith. Well, I was 6 years ago.

There's a study of about 70000 people that has run for most of their lives from 1946 I think it was. Brain power was one of the main facets of the project.

That's a seriously long project and I'll post on it when I have time. Somewhere on FB as Tech Insider - relentless but mostly interesting.

Karearea
14th Jul 2016, 09:42
"Shakespeare", 30325, top 0.01%.
Interesting.

chuks
14th Jul 2016, 09:49
It would be useful to see the results word-by-word. Some of those questions were a bit loose. Other questions, such as the meaning of "avulse," asked about words that nobody but a specialist needs to know.

Inspissation, anyone? (Once, as a junior FO, I was tasked with doing a Q&D review of meteorology for our group of new-hires, when one jumped me with that word, one I had no idea of. V. impressive trick, that, except that I then asked him a few questions about the basics of meteorology, which he flubbed. Down in flames he went, after having drawn the attention of the whole class.)

Peter-RB
14th Jul 2016, 11:33
I only need a few like..

Yes Dear coming.....=3

Please may I have another Gin and tonic with Ice and a slice....11
(a & I are letters)

I will be at the Rugby club Saturday afternoon, please would you collect me at 20:00hrs say 15 .

When is breakfast/lunch/dinner ready..4 x 3 times =12 Total 41

So possibly I could survive being a normal man type person..! :ok::D

AtomKraft
14th Jul 2016, 11:52
29800

Add more characters

Loose rivets
14th Jul 2016, 12:23
Pah! I looked each one up and gave it thought. I got less.


I hate when that happens.:*



Maybe it's got a "you looked that up" detector, and deducts marks. I've a notion a lot of people are since googoide is finding the word even faster than instantly i.e. given instantly would be after you'd entered it. This gets it at about synonym f . . . and it's there.

Sallyann1234
14th Jul 2016, 13:21
30500.
I'm sure you need a lot more than 50 words to get a reasonable assessment of someone's grammar.

Did anyone else get a pop-up message to 'Slow Down' ?

I would have thought the quicker you could respond, the better.

Jhieminga
14th Jul 2016, 14:23
30150, not bad for a second language. I'm not sure I'm Shakespeare material though...

Lonewolf_50
14th Jul 2016, 15:02
Would you settle for Marlowe (http://www.theshakespeareconspiracy.com/shakespearevsmarlowe.html)? :)

er340790
14th Jul 2016, 15:20
29,800.

I have to confess, I'm a little disappointed there. :{

I blame it on living with all these Colonials who don't talk English proper. ;)

goudie
14th Jul 2016, 15:24
29951, not bad for someone from Sarf Lunnon, know wot I mean?

bnt
14th Jul 2016, 16:14
As a statistical exercise, you could get away with 30 questions and be reasonably confident about the results, so 50 is good. The results are relative to the population of test takers, so me getting "top 0.16 percent" is more interesting than my absolute score (29800). Most of the posters in this thread are in the top 0.2% or so, so I have to wonder ... who are all these other people doing the test, getting "average" scores in the 15-16000 range?

IBMJunkman
14th Jul 2016, 17:41
http://i63.tinypic.com/rm8gt2.png

That was fun. I admit guessing on a few of the answers.
I obtained the same. We both be geniuses!

finfly1
14th Jul 2016, 18:35
"Most of the posters in this thread are in the top 0.2% or so, so I have to wonder ... who are all these other people doing the test, getting "average" scores in the 15-16000 range? "


My guess is that a tremendous number are on the book of faces.

This same quiz was found there, and the range of scores and level of intelligence of those on that particular corner of the internet are far FAR from those here.

The results may be further skewed by those who took the test and did not post their scores, myself included. My 'wife's family' all took the test on fb and three of them had perfect scores. She and I each missed one question, and I'm kind of dubious about their opinion on that one anyhow.

treadigraph
14th Jul 2016, 18:42
30150, leaves room to improve but I'll have to forget something first...

G-CPTN
14th Jul 2016, 18:54
My 'wife's family' all took the test on fb and three of them had perfect scores. She and I each missed one question, and I'm kind of dubious about their opinion on that one anyhow.
I must have missed that - what is the maximum possible score?

finfly1
14th Jul 2016, 19:30
To best of my knowledge and belief...30,500.

CATIII-NDB
14th Jul 2016, 22:18
30150 for me.

A bit disappointed.

CAT III

bugg smasher
14th Jul 2016, 22:56
Is there a count out there somewhere of total number of words in a given language? One seems to recall the Chinese have 45000 or so, each represented by its own pictogram, the dictionary beginning with one-stroke characters, progressing to 45 or more. How big is that typewriter?

Fitter2
14th Jul 2016, 23:11
http://i63.tinypic.com/r7ruw1.jpg

Looks like the max is 30500

vapilot2004
15th Jul 2016, 01:30
I obtained the same. We both be geniuses!

Excellent IBMJ! What shall we do with the combined power of our massive encephalons? World Peace? Another go at Cold Fusion? Feeding the Masses? Space Exploration? Educating the Ignorant? The possibilities seem endless. :ok:

G0ULI
15th Jul 2016, 01:59
Bill Bryson wrote an excellent book, English the Mother Tongue (and how it got to be that way). There can be no accurate count of english words because in addition to the 450,000 words in relatively common use, there are archaic words, technical terms and chemical names, and a huge number of adopted words. I seem to recall that there are something like 1.2 million unique chemical compounds that have been described. So a complete list of all English words would surely exceed a couple of million.

Similarly, it is extraordinarily difficult to assess someone's vocabulary. Even the most erudite person can be stumped trying to define an everyday word if the question is sprung on them without any context. However when a word is used in context within a sentence we either dredge up the meaning from our memory or, if it is an unknown word, we work out its meaning from the rest of the text and context.

Keen readers and scholars probably have a vocabulary in excess of 150,000 words. Even the barely literate can probably make sense of 35,000 words if english is their native language.

There is probably a core of a couple of thousand words that will allow you to conduct the basics of everyday life, buy food, ask for directions, etc., but even at this most basic level you would be constantly learning and adding new words to your vocabulary.

The biggest complaint I have heard from expats who have learned a second local language is that while they can get by, they can't get involved in deep philosophical discussions with the locals until they have had many years experience with their new language skills.

In my experience, alcohol goes a long way to solving this problem.

vapilot2004
15th Jul 2016, 05:10
In my experience, alcohol goes a long way to solving this problem.


I can confirm this holds true.

Sallyann1234
15th Jul 2016, 09:57
I don't believe this is an accurate test.

Posters on here come from a very wide range of backgrounds and education, some with English as a second language. And yet everyone has the same result of about 29000 to 30000.

Google says the OED has 171000 entries, and although many will be archaic or highly specialised terms I cannot accept that no single result could fall outside the very narrow range reported above.

KenV
19th Jul 2016, 18:59
Something appears to be amiss with this quiz. English is my 2nd language (technically 3rd language, but my 1st language does not have a written form) and I am supposedly Shakespearean with 30150.

Lonewolf_50
19th Jul 2016, 19:23
Something appears to be amiss with this quiz. English is my 2nd language (technically 3rd language, but my 1st language does not have a written form) and I am supposedly Shakespearean with 30150. Possible explanation: the awesome (un)college education, undergrad, one each, and all of the preps for the JORR. :cool:

Loose rivets
19th Jul 2016, 22:11
Are we all missing the sarcasm? Shakespeare - making words up - etc., etc.

reynoldsno1
22nd Jul 2016, 04:35
Even the most erudite person can be stumped
An MIT linguistics professor was lecturing his class the other day. "In English," he said, "a double negative forms a positive. However, in some languages, such as Russian, a double negative remains a negative. But there isn't a single language, not one, in which a double positive can express a negative."

A voice from the back of the room piped up, "Yeah, right."

Rossian
22nd Jul 2016, 16:02
..... the expression of utter disbelief in that fair city is, after hearing what the listener reckons is BS, is "Aye that'll be right,eh".

The Ancient Mariner