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seafury45
26th Jun 2016, 09:35
Hi everyone,

I am doing research for my family history. Isn't everyone these days?

One of the frustrating aspects is following promising tidbits of information into dead ends and I have hit several of these at present.

So, has anyone used DNA to help with the broad search in genealogy? If so, was it useful, and can you recommend it?

Thanks

cavortingcheetah
26th Jun 2016, 10:05
In the process of doing just that now. Awaiting results and will return with information. I expect to be told that I have, what should I call it, African blood? The reason for that supposition is the family story that my gt gt gt gdfthr was hanged by the South for running a slave underground. Somewhere along the road he apparently tampered with the merchandise that he had liberated. If that's so then I shall be able to make utterly depraved racist jokes with impunity because I shall have in invested interest in the same gene pool. I look forward to finding that another of my ancestors will have been Jewish and as I was born in Glasgow I shall be as one might say, jocularly impregnable.

PAXfips
26th Jun 2016, 10:14
I wonder how that should help anyway?

My own research have brought me on some trees back to 1600s using online resources only so far.

cavortingcheetah
26th Jun 2016, 10:25
I have to agree that it does seem of limited informative use. The kit was a present and I am prone to the speculations that the person who gave me the pack is neither very sneaky nor pregnant.

TowerDog
26th Jun 2016, 10:53
Quite useful indeed.
I did the DNA thingy 2 years back and got quite a bit of, shall we say, background info?
3.7% Neanderthal in my genes. (Some friends though the comma was in the wrong place)
Related to Tolstoy, he who wrote War and Piece.
So I was 99..8 % European, 58% Scandinavian, 10% British and Irish, the rest Central Europe.
No Jewish or African genes, but I am related to Warren Buffet and Jimmy Buffet, but not close enough to be on their Christmas Card lists.
Also got a list of diseases I would not die from.
The company who provided all of the above information and much more, call themselves 23andMe. $99 two years ago, more now.

Wife did the same and found out she was related to Napolean Bonaparte :ooh:

obgraham
26th Jun 2016, 15:58
Some folks in my family "tree" have used the DNA to make a definite connection to certain other branches of said tree.
However, for those of us coming from a relatively non-mobile population, like my Northern English background, I wouldn't expect any great revelations.

le Pingouin
26th Jun 2016, 17:59
DNA needs a reference sample for comparison if you're going to make anything other than generic connections. Meaning you need a sample from the someone else in the section of the tree you think you're related to to show anything.

PAXfips
26th Jun 2016, 18:12
How did that private company got hands on Bonaparte DNA for comparison?

If I might highjack this for another question on genealogy:
What software are you using to store your fidings? I use the web-based 'webtrees' which I run on a private webserver. Very handy for me and doesnt oblige all work to me, say, when my brother or uncle finds something new, they can just enter it.

Mike6567
26th Jun 2016, 18:57
Sorry chaps but I think it is a bit like astrology
DNA ancestry tests branded 'meaningless' - Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/science/science-news/9912822/DNA-ancestry-tests-branded-meaningless.html)
I have long been interested in family history. In about 1700 I/we have 256 great something grandparents. I accept DNA can determine parents and possibly a few generations back but how on earth can it make sense of anything from 300 years and greater ago?
Mike

lomapaseo
26th Jun 2016, 21:13
I have long been interested in family history. In about 1700 I/we have 256 great something grandparents. I accept DNA can determine parents and possibly a few generations back but how on earth can it make sense of anyting from 300 years and greater ago?
Mike

all I want it to do is to confirm my previous research or not.

Previously I trace back to Wales with a hint of Roman (Mediteranean area) and possibly Northern Europe. Will see when the DNA results come in. Perhaps they can tell if my ancestors had pre-hensile tails

cdtaylor_nats
26th Jun 2016, 21:40
Mine came back as this, which is pretty much as expected. I've only confirmed one link that was suggested by DNA but I know it was correct

Europe 98%
Ireland 54%
Great Britain 16%
Europe West 12%
Scandinavia 11%
Trace Regions 5%
Iberian Peninsula 2%
Europe East 2%
European Jewish < 1%
West Asia 2%
Trace Regions 2%
Caucasus 2%
Show all regions

G-CPTN
27th Jun 2016, 11:37
4HHT_V294Co

TowerDog
27th Jun 2016, 12:40
[QUOTE]. How did that private company got hands on Bonaparte DNA for comparison?

No idea, relatives perhaps

If I might highjack this for another question on genealogy:
What software are you using to store your fidings? I use the web-based 'webtrees' which I run on a private webserver. Very handy for me and doesnt oblige all work to me, say, when my brother or uncle finds something new, they can just enter it. [/QUOTE

The DNA company has a web page I can log into and view my results and it is constantly updated with new matches and new relatives popping up as more people join in.

Being from Norway I though my family tree would be right there but lots of Norwegians emigrated to the USA 150-100 years ago, hence the DNA map with relatives show 500-600 people in North America related to me.
Small world. :ooh:

obgraham
27th Jun 2016, 16:16
Isn't Napoleon's dong in a box somewhere?

Perhaps that was the source!

Stanwell
27th Jun 2016, 16:31
Erm ... I'm not sure where Josephine is, but I guess that's possible. :E

G-CPTN
27th Jun 2016, 17:05
Napoleon's penis was cut off by his doctor during the autopsy and given to a priest.
It was subsequently sold and is now in private hands (!) in the USA.

Jhieminga
27th Jun 2016, 18:46
What software are you using to store your fidings?
I am not that much of a genealogy expert but I have been using 'Reunion' on a Mac for a few years now. I like it a lot, especially the fact that I can link it to an app on my iPhone, enabling me to enter new data while on the go and basically carrying my entire family tree in my pocket. Just my 2 cents.

TowerDog
27th Jun 2016, 20:09
. Napoleon's penis was cut off by his doctor during the autopsy and given to a priest.
It was subsequently

Now that is sick.
Why would anybody collect Napoleon's, or any man's penis?
I can see Einstein's brain being of some value for research, but a penis....?

IBMJunkman
27th Jun 2016, 21:27
No one is concerned that someone other than you now has your DNA?

I thought about doing the test with Ancestry.com. I could find nothing in the documentation says they destroy your sample after the test.

G-CPTN
27th Jun 2016, 23:06
Now that is sick.
Why would anybody collect Napoleon's, or any man's penis?
I can see Einstein's brain being of some value for research, but a penis....?
The guy who acquired the weenie (after it had been displayed in the Museum of French Art) was a renowned urologist. It remains in his family.

Stanwell
27th Jun 2016, 23:40
Oh c'mon, CPTN.
This is getting sillier by the minute.
I suspect you're having a lend of us..

So, now we're to believe that Napoleon's dick originally might, perhaps, have been a venerated religious icon ....
Then, .. it's a work of art??
Ah, yes .. Bring the family, check out Napoleon's knob!
FFS... You're stretching it a bit.

What's its purpose now, 'within the family', that is?
Do they hold 'private' viewings?
Or, is it just something to hang on to?

I think we should be told.
.

lomapaseo
27th Jun 2016, 23:43
The guy who acquired the weenie (after it had been displayed in the Museum of French Art) was a renowned urologist. It remains in his family.

let's hope the Napolean's privates remain private and not used to repair a bunch of Grecian statues from a mold

TowerDog
27th Jun 2016, 23:44
. No one is concerned that someone other than you now has your DNA?

I thought about doing the test with Ancestry.com. I could find nothing in the documentation says they destroy your sample after the test.

Nah, does not bother me at all.
My DNA is all over the planet anyway and has been spread by various methods, some of them very pleasant actually.:ooh:

How could somebody abuse your DNA? Cloning? Sell it to the Russians?:sad:

tony draper
28th Jun 2016, 07:20
Watched a good lecture on the state of research into the human genome,it is a field advancing so rapidly it is almost impossible to sum it up at any given moment,admittedly the lecture was more into human origins than the subject of the thread,someone in the audience asked a question re the sending a sample and getting a summary of your ancestry and from whence they hailed for a fee
He was very dismissive of it whilst not exactly calling it a racket he indicated such a search would need to be a lot more complex than the methods used by these companies at present to be really meaningful.
Not trying to start a argument,been tempted to have me dog tested to see what exactly a mixture he is.
:uhoh:

G-CPTN
28th Jun 2016, 07:49
Oh c'mon, CPTN.
This is getting sillier by the minute.
I suspect you're having a lend of us..

So, now we're to believe that Napoleon's dick originally might, perhaps, have been a venerated religious icon ....
Then, .. it's a work of art??
Ah, yes .. Bring the family, check out Napoleon's knob!
FFS... You're stretching it a bit.

What's its purpose now, 'within the family', that is?
Do they hold 'private' viewings?
Or, is it just something to hang on to?

I think we should be told.
.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2015/06/19/the-strange-journey-of-napoleons-penis/

Stanwell
28th Jun 2016, 08:09
G-CPTN,
Thanks for the link to that article in that august and highly-respected journal, the Washington Post.
I can now tell my friends and colleagues that it's all true - because I read about it there. :ok:

p.s. Kind of reminds me of the Period Piece discovered at the back of an Antique Dealer's...
Seems it was sanitary napkin reputed to have been used by Queen Victoria.

I know, ... hat, coat, etc.

Pontius Navigator
28th Jun 2016, 14:35
Some folks in my family "tree" have used the DNA to make a definite connection to certain other branches of said tree.
However, for those of us coming from a relatively non-mobile population, like my Northern English background, I wouldn't expect any great revelations.
That is the only use I can see. My surname is not common. There are clusters on the east coast based on Yorkshire. One ex-Cumberland that I think is extinct (the name continues but the heir had to change his name to inherit) and my cluster based on Westmoreland.

Then there are two more clusters only a few miles from mine.

We have been unable to establish any links post 17th/18th century and DNA evidence would help. The problem is finding someone in the other clusters who also wanted DNA evidence.

Pontius Navigator
28th Jun 2016, 14:43
I accept DNA can determine parents and possibly a few generations back but how on earth can it make sense of anyting from 300 years and greater ago?
Mike
As I said above, I have identified about 5 clusters with no apparent connection. If I had a positive DNA match linking two clusters then if might resolve some of the 17th Century references where we have records of a common named ancestor but on positive link. For instance records for about 1720 have the same names for fathers and sons with only a 5 month gap between two off spring. Are they different families or cousins?

er340790
28th Jun 2016, 14:48
I don't have 46 (2x23 sets of) chromosomes - honest - genetically I am a 47XY.

The Birmingham (UK) Genetics lab got all excited about it, especially when my son inherited the same sequence from me. It is some kind of residual 'marker' chromosome. I'm now part of some studies in Germany at a leading institute looking into such matters.

[What could possibly go wrong with a German study into eugenics????! :}]

On the upside, I am clearly part of some superior species to the rest of you who have just 46.

On the downside, I see that both chimpanzees and potatoes have 48.

Answers on a :mad: postcard please.....

Grayfly
30th Jun 2016, 12:41
After about 20 years of searching records and building a tree with some branches going way back I decided to try the DNA route a few years back.

Nothing, absolutely nothing that proved anything, except that I started in Africa along with everyone else. Databases are just not big enough yet IMHO. I had a couple of 'good' matches but they didn't even respond to my messages.

I least I got a certificate for the all the money handed over.

lomapaseo
30th Jun 2016, 13:29
Databases are just not big enough yet IMHO

but I suspect they are about to get a whole lot bigger as these kits proliferate.

What worries me is that I may be related to Napolean's dick

seafury45
3rd Jul 2016, 01:02
Thank you everyone for your responses. I think I will go ahead and try it. The cost is not excessive and it may be interesting, or maybe it will just be a bit of a giggle.

11Fan
3rd Jul 2016, 03:46
A mate of mine mentioned that he was a quarter Irish, quarter German, quarter Scotch and a quarter Spanish.

I thought it quite sporting of his Mother.

He was not amused.

Ancient Observer
3rd Jul 2016, 13:23
I guess the doc who did the chopping was a bit of a prick.

finfly1
3rd Jul 2016, 13:52
Nah, does not bother me at all.
My DNA is all over the planet anyway and has been spread by various methods, some of them very pleasant actually.:ooh:

How could somebody abuse your DNA? Cloning? Sell it to the Russians?:sad:

As we now know (no surprise), the gummint has demanded DNA samples from these types of companies. Personally, that exceeds my own comfort level.

Gertrude the Wombat
3rd Jul 2016, 14:13
I wonder how that should help anyway?
Well, if May becomes PM, and we all have to supply DNA samples to get the ID cards we'll have to carry, then it'll be a simple matter of asking the database for a complete set of family trees of everyone who has a UK ID card. Provided you can pay, of course.

TowerDog
3rd Jul 2016, 18:30
. As we now know (no surprise), the gummint has demanded DNA samples from these types of companies. Personally, that exceeds my own comfort level.

Aye, Yes of course, how silly of me.
The DNA could of course be used against you if you killed or raped somebody and ended up in court. No doubt you could be convicted if guilty. :sad:

(Although O.J. Simpson walked away despite the DNA evidence, turned out the jury was too stupid to understand DNA evidence, like only 1 in 5 Billion :ooh:)

Pontius Navigator
8th Jul 2017, 14:42
(the jury was too stupid to understand DNA evidence, like only 1 in 5 Billion :ooh:)
"It wasn't me yr honour,'twas t' other fella"

charliegolf
8th Jul 2017, 14:58
DNA in Genealogy

Sounds like a dyslexic with a qualification in rocks n stuff.

CG

Trossie
8th Jul 2017, 15:19
Posted elsewhere:

Be very wary of using DNA to research your family origins, most of those offering this service are no more than snake oil salesmen.

I can back that up with someone's practical experience: A fairly distant member of the family tree had heard that one of his ancestors may have been adopted so he wanted to have a DNA test to see if he was actually related. Someone that I knew at the time was working in forensics so I enquired about the reliability of such a test. The answer was that for paternity type cases they were reliable to the grand-parent level and not much beyond. When this distant relative received his results they were so vague that they could have probably applied to most people randomly picked off the street. I think that the earlier comment about being related to Charlemagne pretty much sums it up. Rather spend that money on good old-fashioned paper research, after all that was the world of our ancestors.

To put this all into context, the opening sentence to the Foreword in Arthur C. Clarke's "2001, A Space Odyssey" is interesting:

"Behind every man alive now stand thirty ghosts, for that is the ratio by which the dead outnumber the living."

That 'thirty' very quickly intermingle once you start looking back!

Beyond a couple of generations it becomes gobbledegook.

Trossie
8th Jul 2017, 15:22
By CG:
DNA in Genealogy

Sounds like a dyslexic with a qualification in rocks n stuff.


... ...

Of course, you know what DNA stands for?

"National Dyslexics Association".

Mr Optimistic
8th Jul 2017, 15:40
OK, let's get rid of the politics first. Wasn't it Blair and Brown who wanted Id cards ?

Re ancestry.com and wife's hybrid status ( or non-aryan as I describe it to her), daughter reckons her DNA result, which preceeded wife's by a few days, changed after wife's results came in. Site identified them as mother and daughter so I wonder if there isn't something retrospective going on.

charliegolf
8th Jul 2017, 17:45
By CG:


... ...

Of course, you know what DNA stands for?

"National Dyslexics Association".

Touche, Tross:ok: