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SpringHeeledJack
14th Jun 2016, 09:04
I was reading an article the other day by the chap who does the Discovery Channel programme 'Dirty Jobs' and in it he was saying to bright eyed and bushy tailed students that the standard advice to 'follow their passions' in the work environment has led to loads of people being qualified for jobs that they aren't very good at, resulting in minimal/no employment. He broadly said that we should aim to do things that we are good at, things that will guarantee a salary to provide a living, perhaps even a good one. A friend earns a king's ransom in the financial world, wants for little, yet yearns to live a simple life doing…….basket weaving :D Obviously he won't be leaving his guilded cage anytime soon and the yearning is just a coping mechanism/fantasy. My careers master opined that 'you should do what you're good at, not what you want and to try and use brain instead of brawn to earn well in life. How many people have spent vast sums of money to educate themselves only to end up in a totally different sector/path/world than the chosen one ?


SHJ

Capn Notarious
14th Jun 2016, 09:34
Has anyone proficient in being untidy: ever had a career in that mode?
The answer to that must be somewhere.

Stanwell
14th Jun 2016, 09:54
I had that one explained to me, once.
It's a way to keep yourself in a job.
You see, if people can't find anything in your department, they need you to be able to put your hand on it.

Andy_S
14th Jun 2016, 12:19
I had that one explained to me, once.
It's a way to keep yourself in a job.
You see, if people can't find anything in your department, they need you to be able to put your hand on it.

I’ve known people who were exactly like that – they deliberately made their record keeping opaque in the belief that if no one else could follow what they do then no one else could do their job, hence it made them invaluable.

Inevitably, it was a counterproductive strategy. It worked up until the first time the individual concerned was absent when some document or data they were responsible for was badly needed but couldn’t be found. At that point, a succession plan was normally discretely put into place.

ExXB
14th Jun 2016, 12:36
I had a boss that believed "Knowledge was power". But he couldn't figure out that he was never promoted because of his attitude. He even rejected my advice on this when, a few years later, he reported to me.

Always be promotable!

Stanwell
14th Jun 2016, 12:49
Of course, then the "Peter Principle" comes into play...
That's where a staff member/manager is promoted to his/her level of incompetence.
Wiki's got a fair run-down on it.

lomapaseo
14th Jun 2016, 12:58
At that point, a succession plan was normally discretely put into place.


watch out for one of those .... it's sure to work when you least want it

cattletruck
14th Jun 2016, 13:45
First you have to have thunk it.

Then you have to be better at it than most.

Generally both of the above ain't easy if you've left it till later in life.

Then luck plays a part - timing, who you know, trends, the weather even, health, war.

Success can be measured in lots of ways not just by having the biggest salary.

Then there is the conundrum of do you live for work or work for a living? Are you overworking for an ideal of a future living?

Do you want more? Have you tried wanting less, you may just end up with more. Is someone else going to spend the inheritance you create?

Do you live a lie? Is work just a 9 to 5 BS factory and are you happy to be in that mode?

Are you surrounded by people who are complete [email protected] Do you have the guts to vote with your feet? It would be a better world if you did.

I've given up with the [email protected] in the corporate world and just tell everyone I'm shyte at everything to their face even though I may be doing work that is way, way beyond them. Kinda funny how they react to that, but it's often the shyte these one-dimensional losers want to hear.

Everything Frank Zappa ever said about corporate America should be held in obeyance.

ExXB
14th Jun 2016, 14:25
Everything Frank Zappa ever said about corporate America should be held in obeyanceDo you mind if I hold that in abeyance

Private jet
14th Jun 2016, 17:29
Ah but how does anyone know what they're good at until they try it? I might be a fabulous pianist but I've never played a piano. I had no idea if I could pilot an aircraft until I did it and even then I was half way through the PPL course before I became confident I'd even finish it. CPL etc. the same. How exactly does your man on the Discovery channel propose people find out what they are good at in the first place? Of course they will gravitate towards what interests them and remember you will never be good at something that you do not enjoy and find boring, at least anything that requires a bit of skill. Many people change careers, I have, twice. If thats what a person wants to do then its up to them, and in my experience its often those that have been in the same line of work from day one that are the dullest to have a conversation with.

Vitesse
14th Jun 2016, 19:14
I've read that most managers live in perpetual fear that their skills (usually lack of) will be discovered.

ORAC
14th Jun 2016, 19:25
If at first you don't succeed.......

Give up and let someone else have a go......

er340790
14th Jun 2016, 19:34
I have discovered since June 10 that I am REALLY GOOD at lying on the La-Z-Boy, watching Euro 2016, while giving a running commentary on each players lack of ability and doubtful parentage.

Must be a market for it somewhere...

G0ULI
14th Jun 2016, 19:59
Next week I have the entire future of our country in my hands, so I have been told... Hope I don't bugger it up!

ShyTorque
14th Jun 2016, 20:52
My wife once said on holiday that I could probably make a fortune in the gigolo hire business. I was really chuffed until I realised she actually meant the pedalo hire business.

SpringHeeledJack
14th Jun 2016, 21:01
Some years ago I was able to see behind the scenes of many jobs/work environments and that was an education in itself, myths dispelled of previously admired 'dream jobs' that were anything but, others that were deemed well paying weren't, except after many years paying your dues as a junior of sorts, others where there was glory but little money and on and on. Obviously differing personality types flourish in different environments and the reverse in others, some large IT companies are actively recruiting Aspbergers Syndrome workers who do incredibly well in such environments, where they would struggle in many others deemed normal.

I think that the 'Dirty Jobs' man had the chance to travel and meet people (and do) a lot of jobs, including clean jobs :-), so has had a fairly broad scope to see how things are in general terms. Here's a snippet of what he said Mike Rowe: 'Follow Your Passion' Is Terrible Advice (http://thefederalist.com/2016/06/07/mike-rowe-follow-your-passion-is-terrible-advice/)


SHJ

GrumpyOldFart
14th Jun 2016, 21:27
Gouli:

Well, as long as you vote Leave you'll be OK. Trust me on that. Just be sure to ignore Camoron's Frightener Of The Day for the next week or so.

:ok:

radeng
15th Jun 2016, 10:53
I guess I was just lucky. From the age of 11, I wanted to be a radio engineer. That's what I became and I suppose I have been reasonably successful at it. I am now retired and financially in a position that if I want to go anywhere by air, it's first class unless there is no first class. My car is an 09 registration and it has just got up to 25,500 miles - first time round. So I don't need a new one of them...

What would be nice but can't be bought is better health.....

Tankertrashnav
15th Jun 2016, 11:21
My wife once said on holiday that I could probably make a fortune in the gigolo hire business. I was really chuffed until I realised she actually meant the pedalo hire business.

Made I laugh!

Not quite the same thing but when I was around 18 I heard there were lots of male prostitutes around, and I reckoned that would be a brilliant way to make a good living.

Then somebody put me wise to the fact that my clients would not be the wealthy sex-starved women that I imagined they would be!

:eek:

Ancient Mariner
15th Jun 2016, 15:04
After dropping out of Junior High (8 years) I joined a cadet ship to follow in my father's footsteps, to become an officer of the bridge. The MD found out I was colour blind so the engine room it was.
After 16 years at sea I decided I wanted to do something else and since then I have basically just gone with the flow.
Selling automation systems, sewage treatment and drinking water projects to SEA, started and run businesses home and abroad in as diverse fields as electronic commission collection from hotels to travel agents, maritime and aviation communication and electronics and now subsea lifting technology.
Regrets? None! I've taken my chances and enjoyed the challenges.
Per

ETOPS
15th Jun 2016, 15:13
I've always followed George B Shaw's advice to a child...

"Spend your time at school finding out what you like to do - then your time at work getting someone to pay you to do it"

Saintsman
15th Jun 2016, 21:42
Most people are in poorly paid jobs because they don't believe they can get a better one.

If you look around there are loads of BMWs and Mercs etc. on the road. They usually come with jobs that command higher salaries. The thing is, the average owner of those cars are no more intelligent than the average person in the low paid jobs. It's just that the lower paid think they are.

People can always earn more. They only have to believe that they can do a job that pays more.

If you don't like the job you are doing, there is always a better job out there as long as you believe you can get it. It took me a few years to realise that you are only held back by self doubt. Once you get over that hurdle, life can be good.

G-CPTN
15th Jun 2016, 22:34
Most people are in poorly paid jobs because they don't believe they can get a better one.
People can always earn more. They only have to believe that they can do a job that pays more.

If you don't like the job you are doing, there is always a better job out there as long as you believe you can get it. It took me a few years to realise that you are only held back by self doubt. Once you get over that hurdle, life can be good.
The trouble is that many people have 'commitments' (such as a mortgage) so need 'reliability' of income.
Also some may need to live within commuting distance of their job.
For some, the type of job for which they are qualified (and likely to get) might need moving house (with the expense that that entails).

Having had a period of unemployment, I became desperate to find a job - any job.
Most of the prospective employers considered me to be 'too qualified for their job' and said that I would be 'unlikely to stay'. :ugh:

Ogre
16th Jun 2016, 12:42
I've often found that doing some of the jobs that no-one else wanted has kept me employed, and gained me a reputation of being a good worker who is useful to have around...

I miss my first "working" role that was out on a flight line, but it was a young mans job and was never going to get me anywhere as far as promotion and prospects are concerned.

I get somewhat peeved at what we used to call guidance counselors (now referred to as "lifestyle coaches" or some other similar trendy title) who would ask what you wanted to be and then tell you that you could be chairman of ICI or similar when it was plain that you could never be (and didn't want to be chairman of ICI) because you just didn't have the smarts required.

I told my kids to pick a career that would always be in demand, and then once they have the qualifications and experience they can do what they like because they have a solid foundation to fall back on

ShyTorque
16th Jun 2016, 14:43
Made I laugh!

Not quite the same thing but when I was around 18 I heard there were lots of male prostitutes around, and I reckoned that would be a brilliant way to make a good living.

Then somebody put me wise to the fact that my clients would not be the wealthy sex-starved women that I imagined they would be!

:eek:
Yes, that would result in the need for some quick back-pedalo!

radeng
17th Jun 2016, 11:40
I told my kids to pick a career that would always be in demand, and then once they have the qualifications and experience they can do what they like because they have a solid foundation to fall back on

The only occupations I can think of where that is the case are midwife and undertaker!

Ancient Mariner
17th Jun 2016, 12:28
Add hairfixer and prostitute, although I'm prepared to debate the solidity of the fall-back foundation of the latter.
Per

RedhillPhil
17th Jun 2016, 19:49
After looking back on my forty one years on the railway I can conclude that - particularly since privatisation - the better the bul*****ter the better the promotion.

Sue Vêtements
17th Jun 2016, 20:21
If you look around there are loads of BMWs and Mercs etc. on the road. They usually come with jobs that command higher salaries. The thing is, the average owner of those cars are no more intelligent than the average person in the low paid jobs. It's just that the lower paid think they are.I might disagree with that in part at least - perhaps some of those people have got those rewards due to their ability to climb the corporate ladder, rather than their belief in themselves. One thing stopping the others might not be a lack of belief, but a lack of desire to play those corporate games. I for one am happy being an IT developer and would have to quit if they tried to make me a manager (simply because it would be just a question of time before they ASKED me to leave :} ) yet that's probably the normal route to that type of lifestyle in the corporate world at least.



Yes, that would result in the need for some quick back-pedalo! or (more likely) ... forward pedalo!

hiflymk3
17th Jun 2016, 20:54
Do what you enjoy doing, you're going to spend a lot of your life doing it. Money, important yes but secondary in terms of job satisfaction.

Ancient Mariner
17th Jun 2016, 21:34
A good place to start, and with countless potential developments, as you have demonstrated.

The MN taught me that an engineer could get work anywhere whilst a deck officer's shore opportunities were a bit limited.

Now that I'm retired from flying, the most useful skills I have at home, and for the children, are those learned at school woodwork, metalwork and as an engineer. I think it impresses the little grandkids a bit :)
Indeed, I'm quite a hit with the kids in the neighborhood as I'm the go to guy when bikes or whatever breaks. One boy aged 7 looked at me with the big blues and exclaimed: "My dad can't fix anything, because he works in an office".
Poor dad.
Per

NorthernChappie
17th Jun 2016, 21:43
I am (genuinely) very good at what I do which is roughly based upon helping people to access large amounts of totally legal EU cash in a totally legal way. Thankfully, my retirement has been pencilled in for early 2018 for many years now. More C152 time I hope.

Krystal n chips
18th Jun 2016, 18:23
I have long thought I have inherited my late Aunt's genes, bless her....a lady who felt it was better to simply sit and enjoy the views of the world interspersed with writing to the "great and the good", all of whom engaged in lengthy correspondence with her.

Alas, she was born in the wrong century and thus, what today would viewed as an alternative lifestyle and she would no doubt be a blogger of note,as a result she was confined to Talgarth hospital for most of her life.....thankfully, mental health has moved on since those unenlightened days......that, I have long since felt a distinct empathy with "Oddball" and his philosophical take on life...:cool:

Sadly, one has been compelled to work from time to time.....appalling I know....but that's society for you.

I am also very good at being independent and open minded, with an ability to ask "why?"...falling firmly into the "there's always one awkward one" category....and being very good at seeing though the ego's of the pretentious and precocious vanities of those I have encountered in my life.

yellowtriumph
18th Jun 2016, 18:59
Most people are in poorly paid jobs because they don't believe they can get a better one.

If you look around there are loads of BMWs and Mercs etc. on the road. They usually come with jobs that command higher salaries. The thing is, the average owner of those cars are no more intelligent than the average person in the low paid jobs. It's just that the lower paid think they are.

People can always earn more. They only have to believe that they can do a job that pays more.

If you don't like the job you are doing, there is always a better job out there as long as you believe you can get it. It took me a few years to realise that you are only held back by self doubt. Once you get over that hurdle, life can be good.
My next door neighbour, who sells up market range rovers etc, told me the rise in the number of BMW's and other expensive cars on the roads was due to the spectacular rise in the PCP phenomenon. (Personal contract plan that allows the more modestly financial able customer to drive around in an expensive car). I still drive around in a beaten up vw golf, or mobile skip as my wife calls it. She however drives around in a brand new Mini Countryman, naturally bought on a PCP.

yellowtriumph
18th Jun 2016, 19:02
Add hairfixer and prostitute, although I'm prepared to debate the solidity of the fall-back foundation of the latter.
Per
... And taxes will always need to be collected!

ian16th
19th Jun 2016, 10:47
Living as I do in foreign parts and not being aware of what a personal contract plan was I did a little Giggling, and found this:

How to understand PCP finance plans - Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/motoring/how-to/10339529/How-to-understand-PCP-finance-plans.html)

The eye catching numbers appear to have none-visible catches.

Tankertrashnav
19th Jun 2016, 17:34
I believe that, until recently, hill windfarms were a good medium

I was well on the road to having one of them (well, one big turbine) until MoD told me I couldn't have it because I live too near to Culdrose.

Bastards :*

er340790
20th Jun 2016, 03:01
Personal contract plan that allows the more modestly financial able customer to drive around in an expensive car

Correct... when we were young we'd save up a grand or so and buy an old banger for a grand, try and keep it on the road and spend weekends pulling bits off similar cars at the scrap yard. (My personal record was a Renault 5, about to be scrapped, that I bought for 100 quid and kept going for 3 years and 25,000 miles. :cool:)

The PCP logic is to get the same punter with the grand, offer him a 500 down-payment and first month lease of 500. As with most leasing, it is a CON. What you are basically doing is getting the punter into way more car than he/she can really afford.

As the 2008 automotive crash showed, the manufacturers were all lying about their residual values (60% after 3 years was NEVER on, more like 30%.) Which accounts for the massive write-downs on their financing arms and the fact that most 'open' leases now conveniently shift the liability for lower-than-expected-residuals onto the punter too.

My semi-retired neighbors sells Fords at the weekend. He reckons at least 80% of his leases are presently "under-water" i.e. the amount still owed is more than the asset's value.

It'll all end in tears... :=

SilsoeSid
20th Jun 2016, 09:58
Has anyone proficient in being untidy: ever had a career in that mode?
The answer to that must be somewhere.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tracey_Emin

Later that year (1999), she was a Turner Prize nominee and exhibited My Bed – a readymade installation, consisting of her own unmade dirty bed, in which she had spent several weeks drinking, smoking, eating, sleeping and having sexual intercourse while undergoing a period of severe emotional flux. The artwork featured used condoms and blood-stained underwear.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/9d/Emin-My-Bed.jpg