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ExXB
14th Jun 2016, 06:38
It has two Boeing 737-400 planes in its fleet, each able to carry about 180 passengers, eight pilots and 50 crew.

:ugh:

Malaysia's Islamic airline Rayani Air barred from flying - BBC News (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-36524396)


...

Fitter2
14th Jun 2016, 07:45
Poor standards of grammar at the former arbiter.

'It has eight pilots, 50 crew and two Boeing 737-400 planes in its fleet, each able to carry about 180 passengers.'

makes perfect sense.

Stanwell
14th Jun 2016, 07:58
I'm asking myself .. 'How did that get past the sub-editor?'
Then it dawned on me.
They stopped teaching English in schools years ago. :{

Tone
14th Jun 2016, 09:53
Minor correction to title - just to get things right
"Latest so called BBC stupidity" Or should it be "Latest BBC so called stupidity"?

Sallyann1234
14th Jun 2016, 10:24
All that's needed is to delete the comma after 'fleet'. Then it parses correctly.

rotornut
14th Jun 2016, 13:51
Back in April the BBC did a video on cows which are sacred in India. Unfortunately, in one scene, they showed a herd of water buffalo saying they were cows :rolleyes:

Ancient Mariner
14th Jun 2016, 14:09
Are water buffalos not divided into at least two sexes? And what are they called?
Per

megan
14th Jun 2016, 14:38
Bulls and cows, at least that's what the locals here call them, and we ship them overseas by the thousands.

Effluent Man
14th Jun 2016, 15:48
It drives my wife mad. We are watching a film and I will say: "That Cortina is too new, that grille only came out for '65 models" Or some such observation.

Ancient Mariner
14th Jun 2016, 20:20
Bulls and cows, at least that's what the locals here call them, and we ship them overseas by the thousands.
Thought so.
Per

Tankertrashnav
14th Jun 2016, 22:58
I've heard about cow elephants, cow whales, etc, but what is a cow a cow of? In other words, what is the singular of "cattle"?

G-CPTN
14th Jun 2016, 23:10
Cattle etymology (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cattle#Etymology).

"deer" which refers to wildlife.
even today, in Scandinavia (well, at least in Denmark) the term "dyr" (deer) refers to non-domesticated animals, not just "deer".

Stanwell
14th Jun 2016, 23:37
Hey, TTN.
You might as well ask .. What is the plural of 'aircraft'?
Some people would have it that you simply put an 's' on the end. (probably with a bloody apostrophe, as well). :hmm:

evansb
15th Jun 2016, 00:37
Be gentle on yourself. Remember we British call a meal a beverage. Tea anyone?

Englishisms: "My motor was in top nick when it was nicked by Nick, who was sentenced to the Nick." "I subsequently repaired the nick in the coachwork"..

Also remember a "motor' isn't actually a motor, but an automobile powered by a motor. A VW Beetle owner from Yorkshire was heard to say, '..me motor's motor is in back'..

Most non-Brits are slightly agog when they learn that "tea" is not actually a beverage, but a late afternoon meal. Imagine being invited for a "steak sandwich", when in fact all they serve you is tea.. A bit odd isn't it?..

Tankertrashnav
15th Jun 2016, 11:13
G-CPTN - from your link

No universally used singular form in modern English of "cattle" exists, other than the sex- and age-specific terms such as cow, bull, steer and heifer.

So I can stop worrying about it!

evansb congratulations on writing "we British". The incorrect and nonsensical usage "us British (or whatever)" in sentences like this is gaining ground, even among speakers who should know better, such as radio and TV broadcasters. I'm frequently to be heard shouting "you wouldn't say 'us call a meal a beverage' " at the TV screen (to use your example).

I really must get a life! :*

Ancient Mariner
15th Jun 2016, 11:48
Cattle etymology (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cattle#Etymology).


even today, in Scandinavia (well, at least in Denmark) the term "dyr" (deer) refers to non-domesticated animals, not just "deer".

In Norway too, and dyr also means expensive. Go figure.
Per

G-CPTN
15th Jun 2016, 15:25
In Norway too, and dyr also means expensive. Go figure.
Per
Well, expensive is deer, too.

wiggy
21st Jun 2016, 11:08
And again

..proof read? look at an Atlas?

La BBC place Toulouse au bord de la mer sur sa carte météo (http://www.20minutes.fr/toulouse/1869407-20160620-bbc-place-toulouse-bord-mer-carte-meteo)

Fairdealfrank
21st Jun 2016, 22:33
And again

..proof read? look at an Atlas?

La BBC place Toulouse au bord de la mer sur sa carte météo (http://www.20minutes.fr/toulouse/1869407-20160620-bbc-place-toulouse-bord-mer-carte-meteo)Stupid bastards, that's MARSEILLE!

BigEndBob
21st Jun 2016, 22:53
Remember when the BBC journos went on strike, apparently there's 5,000 of them!

sitigeltfel
22nd Jun 2016, 00:13
Stupid bastards, that's MARSEILLE!

Nope, closer to Arles.

ExXB
23rd Jun 2016, 20:23
RSS feed headline: Donald Trump to arrive in Scotland to open gold course

Tankertrashnav
23rd Jun 2016, 22:38
I wonder what his goons will think of having to leave their much -loved firearms behind.

At least I hope they wont be armed!

G-CPTN
23rd Jun 2016, 23:53
When Obama (and other US previous Presidents) have visited the UK the entourage is very heavily armed.