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Sue VÍtements
9th Jun 2016, 02:51
It's easy, with vertical strokes on the inside and horizontal strokes on the outside (or to be more correct: parallel stokes with each side of the glass having strokes offset by 90 degrees from the other side)

Why? Well when you see the smeared lines that are left, you can instantly tell whether you have to remove them from the inside or from the outside :8




anyone else got any good engineer type tricks?

(especially ones that annoy spouses)

meadowrun
9th Jun 2016, 04:18
Find and open the approved, current, window cleaning maintenance manual (WCMM).
Read the appropriate sections.
Verify there are no applicable revisions.
If there are, read the revisions.
Check required tools list and ensure they are on hand.
Check required supplies list and ensure they are on hand.
Accomplish washing procedures per check list and sign off tasks.
Accomplish drying procedures per check list and sign off tasks.
Contact QC.
If QC signs off as complete and to standard, return tools, supplies and manuals to storage.
If QC notes snags remaining, re-do affected areas.
Have QC approve re-work as acceptable.
Attach serviceable tags, if applicable, and return windows to service.
Find a comfortable chair, open a beer, and wonder why you didn't just call the guy.

Ancient Mariner
9th Jun 2016, 05:58
Real engineers don't have no windows.
We don't need them in the engine room.
Per

clareprop
9th Jun 2016, 07:22
A real engineer wouldn't clean a window, he'd recalibrate its transparency.

ShyTorque
9th Jun 2016, 07:24
Meadowrun,

You didn't mention "make the window safe for maintenance". One must never fail to cover one's backside under H & S rules.

WeeJeem
9th Jun 2016, 07:30
Surely the first steps would to establish what we mean by "window" and to derive an empirical definition of "clean" in the context of a "window". :8

Sallyann1234
9th Jun 2016, 07:58
A real engineer wouldn't notice the windows were dirty.

hiflymk3
9th Jun 2016, 08:00
Is that Windows 7 or 10?

ShyTorque
9th Jun 2016, 08:01
Sallyann, True, in fact I thought most engineers left oily finger marks to prove they'd done the maintenance.

andytug
9th Jun 2016, 08:38
Is that Windows 7 or 10?
If it was 7 you don't need to clean it, just leave it overnight and it'll be 10 by morning.
Unfortunately then Microsoft can see everything going in and out of your house, can change the windows at any time without your consent and you'll never be able to find anything you need again.

yellowtriumph
9th Jun 2016, 11:01
The engineer invests in a Karcher window cleaner so doesn't get any streaks.

Dont Hang Up
9th Jun 2016, 11:28
Quote:
Originally Posted by hiflymk3 View Post
Is that Windows 7 or 10?
If it was 7 you don't need to clean it, just leave it overnight and it'll be 10 by morning.
Unfortunately then Microsoft can see everything going in and out of your house, can change the windows at any time without your consent and you'll never be able to find anything you need again.

Andytug :D:D:D

Tech Guy
9th Jun 2016, 11:47
Chocolate Chip Cookies


Materials:

532.35 cm3 gluten
4.9 cm3 NaHCO3
4.9 cm3 refined halite
236.6 cm3 partially hydrogenated tallow triglyceride
177.45 cm3 crystalline C12H22O11
177.45 cm3 unrefined C12H22O11
4.9 cm3 methyl ether of protocatechuic aldehyde
Two calcium carbonate encapsulated avian albumen protein units
473.2 cm3 theobroma cacao
236.6 cm3 de-encapsulated legume meats (sieve size #10)


Methodology:

To a 2-L jacketed round reactor vessel (reactor #1) with an overall heat transfer coefficient of about 100 Btu/F-ft2-hr, add ingredients one, two and three with constant agitation. In a second 2-L reactor vessel with a radial flow impeller operating at 100 rpm, add ingredients four, five, six, and seven until the mixture is homogenous.

To reactor #2, add ingredient eight, followed by three equal volumes of the homogenous mixture in reactor #1. Additionally, add ingredient nine and ten slowly with constant agitation. Care must be taken at this point to control any temperature rise that may be the result of an exothermic reaction.

Using a screw extrude attached to a #4 nodulizer, place the mixture piece-meal on a 316SS sheet (300 x 600 mm). Heat in a 460K oven for a period of time that is in agreement with Frank & Johnston's first order rate expression (see JACOS, 21, 55), or until golden brown. Once the reaction is complete, place the sheet on a 25C heat-transfer table, allowing the product to come to equilibrium.

david1300
9th Jun 2016, 12:22
Surely there is a more engineering oriented term for oven?

lomapaseo
9th Jun 2016, 12:48
Surely there is a more engineering oriented term for oven?

variable thermal enclave

Sue VÍtements
9th Jun 2016, 12:59
Meadowrun - good one, but you forgot an important step that should be completed any time before step #7 - Don Personal Protective Equipment applicable to task at hand and inform team members of the upcoming process ensuring everyone has a complete understanding of what will (and will not) be done and allow time for any questions.

Also all tools should be inspected for current maintenance level and all supplies must be verified to be in date and any hazmat label read and complied with.


Tech Guy - "Golden Brown"? A little subjective I think := Should you not be referring to a range of hues from a specific colour palette?

simon brown
9th Jun 2016, 13:09
Engineers don't clean windows! they'd delegate that one to the apprentice having sent them out to purchase a "long stay"

cattletruck
9th Jun 2016, 13:22
How many engineers does it take to clean a window?
Exactly the same number it takes to change a light bulb.
Obvious innit.

Ok, so now that we have that sorted, how many engineers does it really take to clean a window?
None, they'll document the reduced efficiency of the window in the manual.
How many technical writers does it take to clean a window?
None, the user can figure it out for themselves.

Q.E.D.

Loose rivets
9th Jun 2016, 14:29
Sends his kid out to do it.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v703/walnaze/PpruNe/kidflying.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/walnaze/media/PpruNe/kidflying.jpg.html)

er340790
9th Jun 2016, 18:06
He gets an approved window-cleaning budget from his boss, orders 4~5 sets of windows, finds an outfit in China to do the cleaning work for him and sends the windows to China in sequence by DHL / FedEx for cleaning and return before getting a Polish bloke to reinstall them.

I claim my 5 pounds!

Cazalet33
9th Jun 2016, 18:48
Hire a Polish bloke to do it.

£7.20 an hour. Not a penny more, nor less.

Tech Guy
9th Jun 2016, 23:15
Tech Guy - "Golden Brown"? A little subjective I think := Should you not be referring to a range of hues from a specific colour palette?

RAL 8001 :)

Vitesse
10th Jun 2016, 07:23
Surely the first thing a real engineer reaches for is the back of an envelope and the stubby pencil behind his ear?

Anyway, the permanent solution is to brick up any window thereby avoiding the need for cleaning in the first place.

onetrack
10th Jun 2016, 13:02
A real engineer would measure the window first to calculate the total area, then calculate the exact amount of window cleaning fluid required to do the job, plus allowing for the approved spillage factor.
It would all be written in a logbook, which would be produced as prima facie evidence, when a dirty window was blamed for the crash.

The Flying Pram
10th Jun 2016, 18:37
The engineer invests in a Karcher window cleaner so doesn't get any streaksAfter my brother-in-law bought one, he complained it was difficult to fill with water, through the little hole sealed with a rubber bung. He looked a bit sheepish when I told him it was described as a Window Vacuum, and that hole was for draining out the water it had removed from the windows!

Suffice to say, he's not an engineer...

Hydromet
10th Jun 2016, 20:43
My daughter the engineer doesn't - she gets a boy in to do it.

Ogre
11th Jun 2016, 04:12
He gets an approved window-cleaning budget from his boss, orders 4~5 sets of windows, finds an outfit in China to do the cleaning work for him and sends the windows to China in sequence by DHL / FedEx for cleaning and return before getting a Polish bloke to reinstall them.

That's a project managers solution, the thread distinctly states "Engineer"

While the engineer is defining the requirements and how they will be verified, the technician and or mechanic will get a bucket of water and a chamois and wash the windows without any fuss. The engineer will then verify the requirement has been met and the project manager will take the credit for the increased visibility....

hiflymk3
11th Jun 2016, 09:06
Meanwhile a "manager" with an MBA, (should be MBS) would call endless meetings to rename windows as, transparent optical enhancers or suchlike. Would then think outside the box or whatever the latest management buzzword jargon is and decide that new windows are needed. Without consultation with lower orders such as Engineering or Maintenance departments, will order new windows from a supplier who he happened to meet at the club.

Manager then takes a luxury holiday paid for by window supplier during which time new windows are installed. Supplied windows are of substandard quality and agreed budget has more than doubled.

Manager is fired with a golden handshake and glowing references. A new manager is hired only to repeat the process.

radeng
11th Jun 2016, 09:08
hifly

MBA usually is the acronym for 'Much Bigger Ass**le'!