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peekay4
5th Apr 2016, 02:29
United Airlines flight attendant pulled emergency slide, walked away (http://mashable.com/2016/04/04/united-flight-attendant-slide/)

A United Airlines flight attendant pulled the emergency slide and exited a parked plane at George Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston on Monday morning.

The flight from Sacramento landed at the airport at 11:26 a.m. and taxied for five minutes.

After the Boeing 737 made a complete stop at the gate, the flight attendant opened the plane's front door, deployed the emergency slide, slid out and walked away. ...

While the flight attendant's motive is not immediately clear, United said that they believe the action was done intentionally.

The airline removed the flight attendant "from her flying duties."

Airbubba
5th Apr 2016, 03:05
An earlier thread on the subject inspired by Steve Slater's infamous JetBlue exit:

http://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/423642-most-stylish-fa-exit-award-goes.html

peekay4
5th Apr 2016, 03:24
Wow I had forgotten all about that one! I wonder what happened to him?

Dealing with customers is a tough job.

Airbubba
5th Apr 2016, 03:46
Wow I had forgotten all about that one! I wonder what happened to him?

Slater was found in flagrante delicto with a friend at home in Queens and arrested. He posted $2500 bail.

He received an offer to host a reality show:

Former JetBlue flight attendant Slater receives offer to host reality TV show | NJ.com (http://www.nj.com/entertainment/tv/index.ssf/2010/08/former_jetblue_flight_attendan.html)

He later copped a plea and was ordered to undergo mental health and substance abuse counseling and treatment.

He blamed a variety of factors for his actions:

"Mr. Slater felt somewhat humiliated after what he perceived as degrading working conditions, and he had a level of rage at the time that was perhaps exacerbated by alcohol intoxication and maybe some other contributing stress factors," the district attorney said. "As a result, I think he overreacted when he was confronted by what he perceived as a rude passenger."

Brown said activating the escape chute "was no laughing matter," and he scolded Slater and the public for not taking his actions more seriously. The district attorney noted that it cost $25,000 to fix the slide and that the plane had to be taken out of service, causing flight delays.

Slater, who has no criminal history, has said he cracked under pressure because of his terminally ill mother, recently deceased father and health problems of his own, including HIV.


Ex-JetBlue flight attendant Steven Slater pleads guilty to criminal mischief, will undergo counseling | NJ.com (http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2010/10/ex-jetblue_flight_attendant_st.html)

aterpster
6th Apr 2016, 14:03
A F/A who does that should see the inside of a jail cell for at least 30 days.

ehwatezedoing
8th Apr 2016, 12:06
How about giving them adequate working and pay conditions intead?

aterpster
8th Apr 2016, 13:06
How about giving them adequate working and pay conditions intead?

Whatever that might be. No one forces a person to take a safety job. But, if they do take it then they have a moral and legal obligation to NOT sabotage the airplane.

Chris2303
8th Apr 2016, 14:30
She needs help more that she needs punishment. Love the punitive retributive society in which we live.

Hotel Tango
8th Apr 2016, 14:38
Love the punitive retributive society in which we live.

I tend to read those type of posts with the total contempt they deserve. You have to remember that the maturity level of some posters is highly questionable, in as much as they haven't grown up yet ;)

John Marsh
8th Apr 2016, 14:45
Chris2303:
She needs help more that she needs punishment. Love the punitive retributive society in which we live.Seconded. Fortunately, she acted out whatever problems she has in a non-life-threatening manner. It's worrying that she reached this level of crisis without it being picked up on earlier.

Airbubba
8th Apr 2016, 16:24
For now it looks like she is no longer with the company from this news update linked below:

HOUSTON - Sources have confirmed a picture obtained by Channel 2 News features the United Airlines flight attendant who was fired after she intentionally opened an emergency slide.

Video shows Julia Price opening a plane door and inflating the emergency slide after the aircraft landed Monday at Bush Intercontinental Airport. The Federal Aviation Administration is now investigating the incident.


Maybe the union will get her job back or she will sue United to get a settlement, I've seen it happen in more egregious cases over the years.

How about giving them adequate working and pay conditions intead?

Fortunately, she acted out whatever problems she has in a non-life-threatening manner.

Perhaps she was bullied or felt reduced inclusivity and wanted to send a message with her actions. Or needed to retreat to a 'safe space' to find refuge from perceived income inequality.

At least she remembered to take her luggage before deplaning:

The plane had just landed at IAH around noon from Sacramento. After the chute deployed, Price first throws her bag to the ground nearly 15 feet below and then she slides down the inflated slide to depart the aircraft.

Flight attendants are trained for this sort of thing in an emergency, and Price apparently took that training seriously, sliding down the chute in textbook fashion.

A F/A who does that should see the inside of a jail cell for at least 30 days.

She needs help more that she needs punishment. Love the punitive retributive society in which we live.

Obviously a drunk passenger who popped a slide or otherwise interfered with the safe operation of the aircraft would expect to be facing significant federal charges.

However, in this case we are assured that Ms. Price did nothing illegal by intentionally popping a slide:

Channel 2 Legal analyst Brian Wice says in his opinion its unlikely this flight attendant will be charged with a crime.

I cant see any wrong doing on a local state or federal level that this flight attendant might have engaged in, he said. "She didnt act to put herself, the flight crew or any of those passengers that are on the United plane at risk.


Video of the former flight attendant exiting the plane in this updated article:

United flight attendant fired after emergency slide exit at IAH (http://www.click2houston.com/news/united-airlines-flight-attendant-opens-emergency-door-deploys-slide-after-plane-lands-at-bush-iah)

Chris2303
8th Apr 2016, 16:49
I tend to read those type of posts with the total contempt they deserve. You have to remember that the maturity level of some posters is highly questionable, in as much as they haven't grown up yet ;)
My post HT - or the whole thread?

grizzled
8th Apr 2016, 17:13
Hotel Tango...

Please clarify: Is it your position that punishment is the answer -- regardless of the circumstances leading up to the event? And anyone who suggests otherwise "hasn't grown up yet" and their opinion must be treated with contempt?

Hotel Tango
8th Apr 2016, 17:48
Ah yes, I see the confusion. My editing error. To clarify, my comment referred to "the punitive retributive society in which we live." I most definitely do not condone punishment. I have edited that post accordingly.

Airbubba
8th Apr 2016, 18:11
Well, hopefully Ms. Price will in no way be punished or otherwise held accountable for her costly actions in the workplace.

Anyway, she has previously demonstrated skills as a food service entrepreneur running a food cart in Pittsburg:

"Creepy," "craypee" -- proprietor Julia Price and her mother/helper, Judy Price, have heard various mispronunciations for the foodstuff the French call krep: a delicately thin flour pancake.

Julia knows crepes, though she looks more like a model. That's because she worked as a model in Paris from 1989 to 1997. She fell in love with French food.

Her "real" job is working as a Continental flight attendant, making once-a-week flights between her base in Newark, N.J., and Paris.


Heard on the street: The sizzle of crepes (http://old.post-gazette.com/food/20020620crepes3.asp)

Chronus
8th Apr 2016, 19:00
I`d hand her a community service order for 1000 hrs as a slide attendant at a kiddies amusement park. She`d soon recover from her passion for slides.

notapilot15
8th Apr 2016, 19:30
Not sure why my comment was deleted, while consensus is no action will be taken.

Whenever a pax does anything perceived as tiny bit bad, like a well known av blogger taking a pic, full force of federal laws are used, but someone in a responsible position for flight safety does outrageous thing, it is a ok.

May be someone can explain if I got it wrong.

Chris2303
8th Apr 2016, 20:16
Ah yes, I see the confusion. My editing error. To clarify, my comment referred to "the punitive retributive society in which we live." I most definitely do not condone punishment. I have edited that post accordingly.
I'm sorry if my comment based on 67 years on this earth offended you

Hotel Tango
8th Apr 2016, 22:04
I'm sorry if my comment based on 67 years on this earth offended you


Chris, you've got the wrong end of the stick. I agreed with you!

It wasn't a dig at you but at that punitive retribution society you refer to. Any level headed person here on PPRuNe would wholeheartedly agree with your comment in her getting help rather than punishment.

Are we friends again? :)

Longtimer
9th Apr 2016, 01:28
Seems that there is an collective agreement in place that the majority voted for, so no sympathy in that regard. Collective Bargaining Agreement (http://unitedafa.org/contract/2012-2016/default.aspx)

Chris2303
9th Apr 2016, 08:50
Chris, you've got the wrong end of the stick. I agreed with you!

It wasn't a dig at you but at that punitive retribution society you refer to. Any level headed person here on PPRuNe would wholeheartedly agree with your comment in her getting help rather than punishment.

Are we friends again? :)

Sorry I got confused. Friends again :-)

aterpster
9th Apr 2016, 13:08
That collective bargaining agreement is representative of most CBAs under the Railway Labor Act for unionized airline employees. The grievance provisions are virtually identical to those I worked with when I was an ALPA representative.

EDIT: In the pilot contract I worked under we had a provision that a pilot would not be required to pay for any equipment he/she may damage in the conduct of his/her duties. I don't see that provision in the linked United FA CBA. So, in theory at least, the company could bill the FA for the $20,000 plus expense of restoring the slide.

Basil
10th Apr 2016, 13:31
She needs help more that she needs punishment. Love the punitive retributive society in which we live.
Seconded. Fortunately, she acted out whatever problems she has in a non-life-threatening manner.
Except that, had the slide landed on a ramp worker, she could now be facing a manslaughter charge.

oleostrut
10th Apr 2016, 14:12
I`d hand her a community service order for 1000 hrs as a slide attendant at a kiddies amusement park. She`d soon recover from her passion for slides.



She and other employees would benefit from having her duty station changed to the "boat shop" for 3 months or so. Have her learn and contribute to the inspection, testing and overhaul of the slides and rafts. She would gain a whole new respect for these items, and would very likely share her understanding with future, fellow flight crew members.

Even the flight deck crew would benefit from having a thorough understanding of these items, and also learn how fragile they are, and what risks they present to the aircraft and safety of flight.

flash8
10th Apr 2016, 17:23
She and other employees would benefit from having her duty station changed to the "boat shop" for 3 months or so. Have her learn and contribute to the inspection, testing and overhaul of the slides and rafts. She would gain a whole new respect for these items, and would very likely share her understanding with future, fellow flight crew members.

And I vote this one of the most sensible comments I've heard in a long time!

IBMJunkman
10th Apr 2016, 18:03
I would hope she has to pay for a replacement slide.

OldLurker
10th Apr 2016, 18:57
... how fragile they are, and what risks they present to the aircraft and safety of flight.Indeed.
Deployment of right over-wing slide in flight, London TMA, 31 October 2014 (http://www.gov.uk/aaib-reports/aaib-investigation-to-boeing-757-3cq-g-jmab)

Aluminium shuffler
11th Apr 2016, 09:15
So, a crew member with a grudge criminally damages an aircraft, causes a considerable delay for the passengers, large financial cost to the airline and endangers ground crew and passengers in the process and you think she should just be let off with no punishment? Are you posting from a mental institution? She should be charged with the costs born by the company, fired and barred from working in any safety critical task ever again, including revoking her driving licence. I would argue she should be sent for psychological evaluation to determine her risk to society, too.

Rwy in Sight
11th Apr 2016, 11:52
revoking her driving licence

Isn't that too extreme. In the states a driving license is a life line or almost at least outside big cities.

notapilot15
11th Apr 2016, 12:46
A/S

In the free world everyone is entitled to due process. There is no concept of locking up and throwing away the key.

FE Hoppy
11th Apr 2016, 12:55
I would have the little princess re-packing slides until she's done $25k worth of hours. Preferably the same slide which she deployed. Then bin it and her.

Junkflyer
12th Apr 2016, 08:20
Whatever the reasons behind her actions, she still bears responsibility. To suggest that any form of punishment is not warranted is certainly a position that is not well thought out. When employed in a job in which safety and the well being of other people are involved, deploying a slide due to job dissatisfaction is in no way justified.
Should a disgruntled pilot be allowed to act in a way that jeopardizes safety? Obviously not.

Chris2303
12th Apr 2016, 09:45
Should a disgruntled pilot be allowed to act in a way that jeopardizes safety? Obviously not.

If a disgruntled pilot requires professional mental health assistance then he or she should be given it in the same way this flight attendant should.

Sometimes I despair for those in the human race who show such intolerance for their fellow humans who so obviously need professional help.

Stone_cold
12th Apr 2016, 13:37
If they seek the help prior to going on duty . Too much political correctness . This was an unlawful act . There are consequences to unlawful behaviour . Get the damn help you need before sign on !!!

aterpster
12th Apr 2016, 14:34
Chris2303:

If a disgruntled pilot requires professional mental health assistance then he or she should be given it in the same way this flight attendant should.

Sometimes I despair for those in the human race who show such intolerance for their fellow humans who so obviously need professional help.

In the U.S. we have had a alcohol diversion program for both pilots and flight attendants for many years. Lots of help and interventions. But, if they show up for work under the influence they are fired, period.

Same for mental health issues. Lots of options, but crashing or seriously compromising an aircraft isn't one of them.

Pakehaboy
13th Apr 2016, 02:02
If a disgruntled pilot requires professional mental health assistance then he or she should be given it in the same way this flight attendant should.

Sometimes I despair for those in the human race who show such intolerance for their fellow humans who so obviously need professional help.
Chris2303........couldn't agree more,luckily and appropriately many airlines are pursuing avenues that cater to employees with these issues....it's a good thing.The problem arises when employees know they have issues,they will not,and cannot get the help they need....they hide under a rock until it's too late........the avenues for help need to be proactive rather than reactive.....

parabellum
13th Apr 2016, 02:55
EDIT: In the pilot contract I worked under we had a provision that a pilot would not be required to pay for any equipment he/she may damage in the conduct of his/her duties. I don't see that provision in the linked United FA CBA. So, in theory at least, the company could bill the FA for the $20,000 plus expense of restoring the slide.

Even if that provision was in the contract, I can't see how unnecessarily banging off a slide in order to leave the aircraft, when no emergency exists, rather than using the correct exit and air bridge, can even remotely be classified as 'in the conduct of her duties'.

Gauges and Dials
13th Apr 2016, 03:13
Some crimes are based on the criminal making an assessment of risks and rewards: "I can rob that liquor store; I'll net $1,200 cash, and the chances of getting caught and punished are slim." For those people, punishment, a.k.a., throwing the book at them, is a sensible deterrent.

There are other people who act badly because they are, to borrow a technical term from psychiatry, bat-**** crazy. Punishing those people doesn't accomplish much. The person who tries to open the overwing exit in flight because the voices are commanding him to do so, is not going to be deterred in the slightest by the notion that the last guy who tried that got sent to jail for 5 years. Nor is sending this guy to jail for five years going to deter the next bat-**** crazy person from acting out.

Yes, he definitely needs to have his liberty restricted so as to reduce the risk he poses to others and to himself, but no, punishing him doesn't make a whit of difference.

stiglet
13th Apr 2016, 08:52
Any action taken should aim to: punish the offender, protect the public, prevent it happening again and put the victim in the position they were in before the offence took place.

Is this person insane? I would assume unlikely as they have been: employed, trained and operating as aircrew. Any consequences therefore justify punishment of some sort.

This act has demonstrated this person is not suited to working in a public safety related environment. They should therefore never be allowed to work as aircrew again to protect the public from them.

Any punishment metered out should aim to deter anyone else, public or crew from doing this, so preventing it happening again.
Punishing this offender therefore, in my view, does ‘make a whit of difference’ as you put it. Also having ‘his liberty restricted’ is a punishment.

They should be made to ‘put the victim in the position they were in before the offence took place’ so of course they should pay compensation to the company of, at the very least, the cost of the slide.

And lastly they should be made to pay any subsequent court costs.

I can see no excuse for this behaviour.

Gauges and Dials
13th Apr 2016, 10:31
Stiglet, any even remotely rational person would realize that if you wrongly deploy the emergency slide while the plane is at an airport, the chances of getting caught and punished are 100%. It's obvious on the face that this was not even a remotely rational act; I can't imagine how you can call this person sane.

That doesn't, of course, excuse the behavior, nor relieve the perpetrator from responsibility for making the victim whole again, e.g., by paying for a new slide, etc.

But calling for draconian punishment, when it's already obvious that the threat of 100% certain and negative consequences did not deter this crazy person and will not deter future crazy people, isn't going to prevent this from happening again; it's only pointless retribution.

There's a difference between putting a criminal in a cage to punish him, and putting an intractably crazy person in a cage to physically prevent him from injuring others: In the former case we should make the cage experience unpleasant; in the latter case there's no reason not to make the cage experience as comfortable and pleasant as possible.

stiglet
13th Apr 2016, 13:15
Obviously this person 'lost it', but does that make them insane? A moment of madness, did they just loose their temper or are they indeed 'mad'? That is why I put the question. There are degrees of insanity and therefore responsibility.

I was not one of those calling for draconian punishment or suggesting the punishment should be to 'cage' or lock the individual up. If they are indeed found to be sane (or rather not insane) and therefore should be punished the option to restrict their liberty can take a variety of forms besides imprisoning them. Plus the fact of having to pay significant compensation could also be considered a major part of the punishment.

Part of any punishment must also be to make any victim (in this case the company, the staff and passengers affected) feel they have rececived justice for their ordeal - no?

phylosocopter
15th Apr 2016, 21:45
Ahh it is possible that this was not an insane act or even a bad one, Just possibly they were attempting to draw attention to some serious problem (possibly even with passenger safety consequences) in their working conditions and having tried all the proper channels and failed, made a rational considered decision to attract attention in this manner. I dont know! But its a plausible scenario. Some jurisdictions protect wistleblowers for good (safety related) reasons.

caber
15th Apr 2016, 23:46
Ahh it is possible that this was not an insane act or even a bad one, Just possibly they were attempting to draw attention to some serious problem (possibly even with passenger safety consequences) in their working conditions and having tried all the proper channels and failed, made a rational considered decision to attract attention in this manner. I dont know! But its a plausible scenario. Some jurisdictions protect wistleblowers for good (safety related) reasons.

As a flight attendant for a legacy carrier, can't imagine what whistle is being blown. While the lual and lcal flight attendants are still separate working on a joint contract that is not exactly a state secret.

As a pilot there, I can vouch that there are no secret rules or working conditions needing a whistle.

phylosocopter
16th Apr 2016, 00:36
Well (hypothetically) A pilot who was "untouchable" in the organisation developing delusions of omnipotency?. it does happen ! I would certainly want to check out if the FA had genuine concerns first.

Or to put another angle suppose you were FA on the germanwings flight and you thought the captain was about to loop out . If the plane was on the ground how might you ensure it did not continue on its next leg.

I am not suggesting that any such thing was the case here . Just that possibly the FA quite rationally and ethically felt that pulling a landing chute was the only option at the time (rightly or wrongly). It needs to be considered and checked out before the book is thrown at them or they are declared insane.

Imagine (once again hypothetically) that you felt you had to leave your job because in some way safety was being compromised. Would you not feel guilty if you just quietly left? Wouldent you want to make some sort of final attempt to get the organisation to wake up on your way out.

aterpster
16th Apr 2016, 14:42
phylosocopter

Imagine (once again hypothetically) that you felt you had to leave your job because in some way safety was being compromised. Would you not feel guilty if you just quietly left? Wouldent you want to make some sort of final attempt to get the organisation to wake up on your way out.

Sorry, my imagination doesn't run in the same circles as apparently does your's.

westhawk
16th Apr 2016, 15:57
Most people are able to resolve their work-related resentments less dramatically.

Junkflyer
16th Apr 2016, 17:27
It may be my imagination, but many flight attendants seem to like drama.

Hotel Tango
16th Apr 2016, 20:08
It may be my imagination, but many flight attendants seem to like drama.

LOL :) Subtle one there Junkflyer. Like it!

Gove N.T.
19th Apr 2016, 08:15
She needs help more that she needs punishment. Love the punitive retributive society in which we live.
I wonder what the ructions would be if a passenger did that? I suspect a custodial sentence might be imposed

Pakehaboy
23rd Apr 2016, 14:45
Phlosocopter.......When I first read your posts,especially #44,I figured you were on the "terps" and may have needed huge amounts of help yourself.After chewing the cud for a while,I believe you do have valid points,and as you state,they should be at least looked into.

Whether it be cabin or flight crew,we are privy to security and the inner working of the aircraft we fly.We see daily,constant, spontaneous actions by members of any organization,something that has become a trend,now that social media is the theme of the day.

I would also add,as of late,we have had a pilot turn up inebriated,a cabin crew set fire to the lav,and several emergency slide deployments(intentional).To suggest that these actions are by individuals,who want to change policy,procedures,etc etc,and that is the way to do things,then I would also suggest you are reaching for straws here.

I hope you are dead wrong!!, certainly worth thinking about.If this actually turns out to be the case,in your theory,then mate!!! We are in bloody trouble!!!There is no room in this business for those antics.
I certainly hope she gets the help she needs,irregardless of the outcome.As I said,your posts are not that far out of line.You made me think about it.

Fly380
25th Apr 2016, 08:03
I remember in B.Cal days a DC10 was a bit tight on crew hours for the flight ex LGW. The Captain had the front door closed and the jetway removed. The Superchief (CSD) ordered the rear flight attendant to open one of the rear armed doors which she did. I think either one or both of them got the boot.:D:D

Pakehaboy
29th Apr 2016, 12:48
Portvale,whilst I agree with you,where do you draw the line?.There is a huge difference between those that have "real" issues as opposed to those that show-stand.I would make the point,that we are seeing more of this with a "generation" of younger individuals that are coming into this arena,not all,but more than normal.

You just have to look and listen to some of the "attitudes" that prevail,not hard to see if you take the time to listen.
The help and programmes provided by the larger operations are just that,they are there for the taking,but the stigmas attached when an individual fesses up is where I think most of the issue is.I have a good friend who runs one of these programmes,she tells me often,the company knows several individuals have issues,how do they know this?,the paper trail and the " word on the street",but there is a fine line,as to how they,the company,are able to approach the situation.

Right or wrong,unless that individual specifically asks for help,or does,or says something blatantly obvious,the ability to intervene take action of somekind is small.
These programmes and help are proactive and great,but the stigma attached has huge ramifications,we certainly need to refine how they sell " help"....not an easy sell in an industry such as Airlines

aterpster
29th Apr 2016, 14:02
PortVale:

Christ some of you on here.

The whole point of the aviation safety culture is to understand why fallible humans do things to prevent it happening again. Not blanket punishment.

The JetBlue FA who pulled the slide was mentioned earlier in the thread. It was mentioned he had HIV, a terminally ill mother, a recently deceased father. He is a Cretin for his actions on the aircraft but my concern with that incident is why he was at work at the first place. Did JB not have a just culture where he could self-report he wasn't fit to fly and take compassionate leave without having financial concerns? Is this United incident a similar story?

Humans factors. People do stupid things when stressed. It's about admitting human fallibility and establishing the right regulatory and corporate culture to mitigate it rather then getting the noose and 3 legged chair out!

Do you work for an airline?

The Jet Blue flight attendant could have, should have, removed himself from flight schedule with all the issues he had.

Same for the United flight attendant.

But, an airline employee that has a operational/safety job aboard an airliner full of innocent paying passengers has crossed a big red line when they bring their issues/emotional troubles to the airplane.

Pilots have doubtless done this over the years and have sometimes cost everyone aboard their lives.

Aluminium shuffler
30th Apr 2016, 07:55
Port Vale, people with your forgiving nature are a large part of why behaviour in society as a whole, not just safety critical environments, is in such decline. Companies must support staff that come to them with a problem, but there can never be a justification for behaviour like this. Blowing a slide because, for example, a crew are insistent on departing without deicing is extreme but perhaps a final act to prevent an accident if the pilots refused to listen, but walking away away after the event is clearly a tantrum and not making a stand over a safety issue.

Yes, the event should be studied to learn why it happened to avoid a repeat, but for Christ's sake, we need to bring back repercussions for being an arsehole. So many advocate not a blameless culture, but we're getting, in some quarters, a get away with anything culture.

edmundronald
30th Apr 2016, 12:55
Phylosocopter raises an interesting point.

Apart from that, the law sets down a scale of punishments - you know, a few years in prison for murder, ten year of hard labor for copying videos, etc. Where in that scale is deployinga chute supposed to fit in? It's not exactly life-threatening behavior. Maybe a hundred hours of community service? I would certainly rate it less aggravating than a pilot turning up drunk after driving his car to the airport ...and please don't tell me that doesn't happen ...

Edmund

Interested Passenger
30th Apr 2016, 13:20
did she take her carry on bag with her? I know that's the worst crime a passenger can comit

keyole
30th Apr 2016, 14:13
$25,000 to fix the slide and that the plane had to be taken out of service.
How on earth can it cost that much to re-instate an escape slide?

Pakehaboy
30th Apr 2016, 14:42
Keyole,does it really matter how much it's costs?!in my 20 plus years on the Airbus I have had two(2) accidental slide deployments,one aft,that deployed as it should,the other into the jetway(major damage) and required a new slide.You are obviously unaware of what goes into repacking,testing ,etc of these slides before being re-installed

I would suggest this to you.An individual who deliberately deploys a slide,for no reason,as in a selfish and reckless act,and actually kills someone on the outside because of their stupid and reckless act,how much is that bloody worth?????

I'm with most posters here,there has to be help,and there has to be repocussions.You cannot allow reckless behavior to be the norm,especially with respect to airline operations.

Airbubba
30th Apr 2016, 15:33
did she take her carry on bag with her? I know that's the worst crime a passenger can comit

Yep, she tossed the bag out before sliding down according to this article with a video:

United flight attendant fired after emergency slide exit at IAH (http://www.click2houston.com/news/united-airlines-flight-attendant-opens-emergency-door-deploys-slide-after-plane-lands-at-bush-iah)

I would suggest this to you.An individual who deliberately deploys a slide,for no reason,as in a selfish and reckless act,and actually kills someone on the outside because of their stupid and reckless act,how much is that bloody worth?????

If she was a passenger she'd certainly be facing felony federal charges in my opinion.

But, since she was in the union, my guess is she'll claim that she was bullied at work and cop a walk.