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AtomKraft
4th Mar 2015, 19:49
I know there's been a few threads on these scams on pprune over the years, and the usual theme is how silly the scammers are, and what fun it is to tick them off. :ok:

All good stuff.

Sadly, I found out yesterday that a family I know have fallen for it.

Now, I better know what sort of people fall for this sort if thing.

Picture a small, house in a part of India you won't ever likely visit.
I know a family who live in their self built house, maw paw and 8 kids altogether, of whom 5 are still at home.

Eldest daughter received a truly un impressive email purportedly from the RBS, telling her she'd won 500,000 in sone UK lottery. Has to be the poorest 419 come on that I've ever seen. Really poor quality.

To cut a long story short, she fell for it. Paid a few hundred pounds worth of rupees for some clearance, then the same again later for some bogus 'anti terrorism certificate', more rupees to have her bank account expanded to accept the massive sum that was coming, and so on. The chap she spoke to swore 'on his god' that it was all perfectly genuine.

They borrowed money, to pay these fees, and impressively recorded all the phone conversations.

Now out the equivalent of 2500, which is an absolute fortune for them.

So. This is the sort of people that these scammers really pray on: simple, trusting, poor ignorant, desperate and maybe a bit greedy people.

I was amazed she could be so gullible. I knew there were folk out there who fall for this sort of thing, but it hadn't occurred to be that folk as penniless as these were keeping the 419 mob in funds.:(

Seldomfitforpurpose
5th Mar 2015, 00:02
This sounds like a scam to me to get some gullible Pruners to send money to some Indian fake folk.............. :=

G-CPTN
5th Mar 2015, 00:12
The current scam doing the rounds here is when the victim is told by telephone that their bank account has been compromised and a courier will be sent to collect their cards.

You can guess the rest . . .

Metro man
5th Mar 2015, 00:31
The scammers often don't try too hard in the initial email because they are out to find the really gullible prospects. They would rather have fewer responses that are more likely to go along with the scam than have a huge number of replies to follow up, and then have almost all of them back out.

AtomKraft
5th Mar 2015, 03:55
Seldom.
Must be nice to have such great judgement. :ugh:

Metro.
That's a good point. The letter was so poor, only someone who had never seen a 419 or was completely gullible could fall for it.

Pinky the pilot
5th Mar 2015, 03:59
The current scam doing the rounds here is when the victim is told by telephone that their bank account has been compromised and a courier will be sent to collect their cards.


When the 'courier' arrives to pick up the cards, perform a citizens arrest, using whatever force you deem necessary at the time to restrain said 'courier' and call the Police to come and get him!:ok:

Make sure you have a reliable witness observing the whole thing.

ChrisVJ
5th Mar 2015, 07:20
Sorry Pinky, they are just a courier, not the perpetrators.

Solid Rust Twotter
5th Mar 2015, 07:30
Complicit in committing a crime regardless.

Pinky the pilot
5th Mar 2015, 11:05
Complicit in committing a crime regardless.

Precisely. And then seat them in a chair under a hot spotlight and ask them questions such as....

''Alright, you gunna talk?? Or do I call on a couple of Centurions to lean on you?":eek:

Apologies to Wayne and Schuster

I'm sure you get the idea.

charliegolf
5th Mar 2015, 11:16
A recent one (couple of years ago) was much more subtle, even if it was low tech. A rather attractive woman knocks the door and asks to use the phone to call her hubby, cos she's broken down. Won't hear of accepting help, just the call please, cos the mobile is dead too. She then dials a premium number rigged to a massive charge, gives thanks and leaves.

Is it a crime even?

CG

G-CPTN
5th Mar 2015, 12:56
Just had 'Susan' call me from Windows Technical (I notice they don't claim to be Microsoft), using a 'Sheffield' dialling code.

I managed to keep her occupied until she escalated the call to 'Martin' her supervisor, and I've had Martin call back several times after the call kept 'dropping out'. :E

I did a Googoo search on the telephone number and was presented with:-
Pay with PayPal1. Make a payment of 2.99 by clicking this button: 2. After payment proccess complated,
return to this page and click this button: sic . . .

Cyber Bob
5th Mar 2015, 13:14
A recent one (couple of years ago) was much more subtle, even if it was low tech. A rather attractive woman knocks the door and asks to use the phone to call her hubby, cos she's broken down. Won't hear of accepting help, just the call please, cos the mobile is dead too. She then dials a premium number rigged to a massive charge, gives thanks and leaves.

Is it a crime even?

CG

No CG, you have invited her into your home and offered her your phone to make a call. No crime has been committed hence why it's a pretty good scam. You either dial the number for her or tell her to go next door!

Thomas coupling
5th Mar 2015, 13:37
I got another old fashioned Nigerian scammer via e-mail last month. Usual stuff:
I see your car is for sale for "X". My shipper will send you a cheque for X +100 to cover all expenses for you and whatever is left over please send me the difference.
OK I said, where do you want me to send the money mate?. I string it out as much as possible and after about 10 e-mails winding the dull fu**er up - cough to wasting his time using superlatives and expletives..

Next morning I flash up my e-mail system and lo and behlod he has "bombed" me with 966 e-mails! :D:D

I should have paid him the money shouldn't I?;)