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alisoncc
4th Mar 2015, 01:33
Green burials growing in popularity as Australian filmmaker sheds light on eco-cemeteries

"I think what people really connect to is the emotional, spiritual aspect. That is why we tell a personal story in the film. It's a lot more comforting to visit these sites that remind you more of the presence of life rather than the aspects of death," she said.

"It's a living ecosystem and they're beautiful when they're done really well. I think what's not to like about it and it just makes sense, it fills the gap between cremation and a $50,000 funeral.

"We touch on the environmental statistics in the film about how much concrete, wood and steel, and embalming fluid go into the ground every year and also cremation, the toxins and energy that uses.

"But definitely green burial is not about just having the most bare minimal thing, you can have a very beautiful ceremony, a lot of these coffins are quite lovely but more simple."Green burials growing in popularity as Australian filmmaker sheds light on eco-cemeteries - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) (http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-03-04/green-burials-growing-in-popularity/6279274)

In my travels around the globe I've often found quiet "spiritual places" that given a choice I would have liked to have been buried there when my time comes.

From places on the North Yorkshire Moors and the Pennines where I used to walk when young, to more recently secluded beaches on the Hawkesbury River near Sydney. All being places where a person can sit quietly and contemplate life and nature for a few hours.

If you could pick a place to be buried, where would it be?

http://www.abc.net.au/news/image/6279442-3x2-700x467.jpg
Body being taken to private place for internment in Canada.

The prospect of just being returned to the Earth without all the palaver that it seems to necessitate these days is very appealing.

onetrack
4th Mar 2015, 03:00
If you could pick a place to be buried, where would it be?A remote position in a rural area or the Outback where my grave wouldn't be threatened with being overrun by increasing CBD development.
I reckon a lot of country cemeteries will still be little different in 500 yrs time.
There are a lot of lovely bush settings in the SW of W.A. that are close to my heart - big Salmon gums and Whitegums, and the utter peacefulness of a quiet, warm, Summers afternoon in that bush, that can't be beaten.

Solid Rust Twotter
4th Mar 2015, 03:54
Don't care. Turn it into dog food if you like.

IBMJunkman
4th Mar 2015, 04:00
Other methods:

Resomation: Florida funeral home brings in 'body liquefaction' machine | Daily Mail Online (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2039016/Resomation-Florida-funeral-home-brings-body-liquefaction-machine.html)

Promession - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Promession)

david1300
4th Mar 2015, 05:53
Turn your ashes into a tree - how green can you get :ok::ok:
https://www.google.com.au/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=cremation%20tree%20kit

WhatsaLizad?
4th Mar 2015, 06:36
Not sure what to make of this story.


My dream would be that upon my peaceful passing during a moment of concentrated bliss in my late 80's, my three 27 year old girlfriends would find some method to dispose of my remains.


Whatever method they choose, I could care less.

joy ride
4th Mar 2015, 06:52
It is not an issue which I have to consider.

All I have to do is insult every living thing in alphabetical order and hope that my trajectory in the space-time continuum spells out an unspeakably rude word in some language.

Wowbagger The Infinitely Prolonged.

Seldomfitforpurpose
4th Mar 2015, 06:55
Having just paid a little under 5k for my recently departed mother in laws very basic funeral, 1 car, low cost box and cremation, I have asked my wife and kids to put me in black bin bags and a cardboard box then cart me to the crematorium in the back of my sons British Gas estate car for no service, no fuss in fact no anything but the burning part.

Then have a bloody good piss up :ok:

beaufort1
4th Mar 2015, 07:34
Whilst in Greenland and near the permanent ice cap we came across this cairn. It apparently marks the spot of an Innuit, because of the permafrost digging not a realistic option so the body is piled under the stones.

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y17/grantdi/Greenland%202008/GLGrave216Feb08lo.jpg

strake
4th Mar 2015, 07:37
As Ronald Reagan said to his daughter when she asked how he would like his remains dealt with, 'Oh well, I don't know. Just go ahead and surprise me'

joy ride
4th Mar 2015, 07:53
Dog-loving eccentric Lord Avebury's will includes a substantial bequest to Battersea Dog's Home, on condition they feed his body to the dogs.

Sallyann1234
4th Mar 2015, 08:59
Body being taken to private place for internment in Canada.

I'd rather my body be buried than jailed. :(

Andy_S
4th Mar 2015, 09:16
I'm ambivalent about where I'm buried or cremated.

However, I have firm views about my journey to my final resting place.

No way I'm I going to be hidden in a wooden box. I insist on travelling seated upright in the passenger seat of the hearse.

Fareastdriver
4th Mar 2015, 09:28
You can really insist on it by hiring a Rolls Royce and driving into the side of the Church at about 90 mph.

alisoncc
4th Mar 2015, 09:30
Sallyanne, point taken. You win some you lose some. :)

My bod has hauled me around for over seventy years, so believe I owe it some repect when I've finished with it.

Wasn't around for either of my parents funerals. They were cremated and the plaques, good for twenty five years, have long since disappeared. So there is nowhere where I can "connect" with them for closure.

There is a huge cemetery close by, with thousands of rows of deceased separated by gravel paths, assiduously sprayed with weedkiller so there isn't a trace of anything natural or green to disturb the sterility of the place.

Neither of the above appeals in anyway. Whilst the thought of being buried on a promontory somewhere with funds left to provide for seat close by, and a plaque "In Memory of ....." to be erected does. With only a few closest being aware of my interrment.

teeteringhead
4th Mar 2015, 09:49
Went to a mate's "green" funeral earlier this year.

After conventional church service we all went off to the "Burial Ground" which was essentially a big field on a farm - probably already 50 or 60 graves there.

Each one had a wooden plaque or cross - no stones - and a silver birch sapling. In due course, he would fertilise the tree which would be part of a very special woodland. I could live with that - if you see what I mean!! - although there's still space in the village Churchyard, which already has a couple of mates.

I certainly agree with alisoncc about the "sterility" of municipal cemetery sites, but a 1000 year old graveyard also has its attractions - the graveyard of a Church which has recently seen a couple of Grandteeterettes christened in the 1000 year old font .........

VP959
4th Mar 2015, 10:07
Having just paid a little under 5k for my recently departed mother in laws very basic funeral, 1 car, low cost box and cremation, I have asked my wife and kids to put me in black bin bags and a cardboard box then cart me to the crematorium in the back of my sons British Gas estate car for no service, no fuss in fact no anything but the burning part.

Then have a bloody good piss up

When my cousins organised (in the loosest possible sense) my uncle's funeral, they did a largely DIY job, with the exception of prepping the body and sticking it in a wicker coffin for which they used an undertaker. They used the farm digger to dig the grave at the church (plot already paid for, as it was a family plot) and used the farm pick-up truck to collect the body and take it to the church.

I was slightly taken aback when I was standing around outside the church, waiting for the hearse, to see my cousins drive up in the farm pick-up truck with the coffin in the back. One of my cousins got out and asked "can you give us a hand to get dad into the church?"

I have to say it was brilliant way to send off an old farmer. We all mucked in as if it were any other job on the farm, even to the extent of burying him and making good the grave afterwards. He's buried within 50m of his old farm, on the top of a hill overlooking it, and all told it was one of the least depressing and most thoughtfully managed funerals I've been to (and I've been to a few lately - getting to that age where most of the previous generation have died and even my generation are starting to go, one by one).

Cyber Bob
4th Mar 2015, 10:56
I'm suprised that a 'Low Cost' operator hasn't muscled in yet:sad:

Nopax,thanx
4th Mar 2015, 11:54
A mate of mine who does some work for a funeral director (mostly collection out of hours but a bit of gravedigging and internments too) is not a fan of wicker coffins.

Apparently when they are covered up with soil they collapse under the weight and the body within lets out a large sigh.....:eek:

VP959
4th Mar 2015, 12:54
A mate of mine who does some work for a funeral director (mostly collection out of hours but a bit of gravedigging and internments too) is not a fan of wicker coffins.

Apparently when they are covered up with soil they collapse under the weight and the body within lets out a large sigh.....

Reminds me of a tale told by my late FiL (which may well be apocryphal), from when he was hours building for his ATPL. He was working in the US, doing any light commercial flying he could get, and was offered the job of transporting a body, in a body bag, in a Cessna or some such, as a night flight by a fairly dodgy outfit he was working for.

There being no load area, the body was just strapped in the right hand seat, with some extra straps to keep it in place.

Take off and climb out were uneventful, but somewhere around 2000 to 3000ft my late FiL was scared witless when the "body" next to him groaned, very loudly. He flew the rest of the flight thinking he may have someone unconscious, rather than dead, next to him. When he landed he was grateful to have it confirmed that the body was not only dead but embalmed, ready for burial. The load groan had been just the effect of reduced pressure at altitude, when some air remaining in the bodies lungs had exhaled.........

G-CPTN
4th Mar 2015, 13:10
What's wrong with "to Hell on a handcart"?

FLCH
4th Mar 2015, 13:19
I did the same thing when I was a young 22 year old, building time, an elderly man didn't survive his brain op and I flew him from Tampa FL to Macon GA in a 172 the seats had been removed except mine to fit him in.
My "passenger" didn't sigh but he sure vented a lot because of the heat, I saw fluids exiting his mouth, his travel garb consisted of a sheet that didn't cover his head, so I kept talking to him asking him if he knew where we were.

Getting a stiff corpse in and out of a Cessna 172 was quite the exercise !

WhatsaLizad?
4th Mar 2015, 17:15
Had a old Biology teacher in my US high school.


As a kid he said he helped out some family members who had the job of relocating coffins from cemeteries in the way of new buildings or roads.


He said some coffins from the 1800's (give or take whatever decades) would have a glass window near the face up part so the grieving family members could say goodbye to the deceased without the smell since it took some travel time by horse and buggy to reach the services.


He claimed it wasn't uncommon to find one with no body visible, and after opening, finding the body curled up and fingernail scratches on the lid in an attempt to get out.


Urban legend? I'm sure it's happened. I can think of far better ways to go. Waking up on a sled in the top pic could be a nicer place to come out of a coma.

Private jet
4th Mar 2015, 23:36
Death is a very lucrative (& obviously reliable) industry for those involved, and of course "the system" supports that (certainly in the UK) There is no obligation to use a funeral director in law of course, but if a family wants a quick , no fuss departure for their loved one (at the deceased's request) they have to go through the "front" of the crematorium, service or not, in a "rigid" container i.e coffin, meeting a certain specification etc. The last wishes of the deceased can only be respected if the industry makes its living first.

onetrack
5th Mar 2015, 00:22
Death is a very lucrative (& obviously reliable) industry for those involved, and of course "the system" supports that (certainly in the UK)In Australia, there used to be many smaller, family-run funeral parlours that had been in the same family for many decades.
Funeral costs from these family-run parlours were not cheap, but they weren't exorbitant, either.

Cue the 1990's and early 2000's, and the big American funeral corporations moved in to Australia, and bought up nearly every family-owned funeral parlour.

They carried out this move in the slyest fashion available. There was no public mention of funeral-parlour ownership changes - the original families were offered huge inducements to sell out and stay on as wages employees.

In particular, it was deemed that there be no visible public change to the trading name, so the public were never alerted to the change of ownership.

As a result, funeral charges have rocketed, as this takeover has essentially resulted in a monopoly of the funeral business. Australia has weak anti-monopoly laws, unfortunately, unlike America.
The costs of a funeral in these parlours today can easily top $15,000. Most grieving families are staggered by the size of the funeral charges, because they come out of left field.
They're used to the charges on a range of things, but not funerals, as they are only infrequently encountered in many families.

IMO, it's high time we had an investigation into the unnecessarily-high cost of funerals in Australia.
I have no doubt a large proportion of that cost is the cost of the family-business takeovers, the monopoly position of the big American players, excessive renumeration to the Americans, and inflated prices on even the most basic funeral items, such as coffins and their accessories.

ex_matelot
5th Mar 2015, 09:14
posted to wrong thread...

deleted

tony draper
5th Mar 2015, 09:16
Then there is the dream funeral, to be buried on top of six politicians of your own choosing. :)

vulcanised
5th Mar 2015, 11:52
I would like a sky burial.

The vultures feeding on my chopped up remains would mean at last I would be doing something useful.

om15
5th Mar 2015, 18:33
This woodland burial site is several miles from my home, I often walk past and see people sitting quietly and visiting, compared to the rather industrial termination of a crematorium this looks a very peaceful way to end up, with a really good pub nearby for the wake, this could be the ideal conclusion, but not just yet I hope.


Ham Down Woodland Burial Ground
http://www.hamdown-greenburial.co.uk/images/green_burial_hp.jpg Situated in an outstanding position with an uninterrupted view of Hambledon Hill, this small woodland burial ground of 2 acres was originally a vineyard and is surrounded by a neat ringfence.
It is sited in an area renowned for its conservation features and great variety of trees and shrubs.

One of its boundaries borders the river
Stour which can be seen from the site. Although remote it can be approached by a tarmac road, which is extended along a
hard surfaced road to a small car park alongside the enclosure.


As the site is adjoining a bridle path which runs through the farm it will be possible for relatives and friends of the deceased to enjoy the surrounding countryside.
Over 140 species of birds have been recorded on the farm, which included such nesting species as Barn Owls, Nightingales and Herons. Nearly 30 acres of the farm consist of woodland, some of which has recently been planted.
Behind the burial ground lies the disused line of the Old Somerset and Dorset Railway, now part of the North Dorset Trailway, which is home to many species of butterflies and plants. Badgers, Roe Deer and Foxes are also plentiful.

http://www.hamdown-greenburial.co.uk/images/green_burial_green2.jpg

We have mentioned these to show you what a beautiful and peaceful place it is.
Outstanding in so many ways, not only for those who want to be laid to rest here but for relatives and friends who wish to mourn their loss in surroundings that are such an integral part of the English countryside.

jimtherev
5th Mar 2015, 21:46
Up here we have a perfect solution for green railway enthusiasts. Butterley station; onto the standard gauge train to Swanwick Junction; optional funeral service - religious or not - in the reclaimed-from-another-site chapel, onto the narrow gauge train to the woodland burial ground.


Until a few years ago, we could offer om's perfect end to the day, too, but the pub next to the burial ground closed and was soon torched by friendly neighbourhood vandals. Being rebuilt, but we believe it will be a domestic residence.
Pity.