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fernytickles
27th Feb 2015, 18:58
Is it true that all the new oil combi boilers are wider than the older models? "Older" being 1999.

And before anyone panics, I'm not going to have the person who made that claim do the work 'cos I think its bs. I just wanted to double check the facts.

This is for in the UK, by the by.

UniFoxOs
28th Feb 2015, 10:28
Don't see why it matters - nobody with any sense would have one anyway.

Kitbag
28th Feb 2015, 11:49
Don't know about a change in dims, but given potential improvements in efficiency you should probably start out working out what you actually need using a little bit of science (http://www.idhee.org.uk/calculator.html) rather than blindly going for a like for like replacement.

fernytickles
28th Feb 2015, 12:51
Kitbag,

I looked at that page & it didn't tell me anything I don't already know. Pretty pointless exercise to be honest.


By spending money on, say, more loft insulation you may save money on the price of the boiler, and you will definitely save money FOREVER on your heating bills. (Seriously? You don't say)

The required boiler output is 9.92 kW

Press your BACK button for another calculation.

spekesoftly
28th Feb 2015, 13:31
Can you not compare the width of your existing boiler with dimensions shown on manufacturers' websites?

Here's just one example:-

Standard efficiency oil-fired boilers - Worcester, Bosch Group UK installer site (http://www.worcester-bosch.co.uk/installer/boilers/standard-efficiency-oil-fired-boilers)

fernytickles
28th Feb 2015, 13:49
That would be the most sensible thing, but unfortunately I'm in Maryland & the boiler is in Midlothian & my arms aren't long enough to stretch that far.

spekesoftly
28th Feb 2015, 13:52
I did wonder, hence my question. ;)

UniFoxOs
28th Feb 2015, 16:59
1999 - not much of a life for a boiler. Just replaced mine at 25 years, and that was my own fault for running it with no rust inhibitor. New one uses about half the fuel, though.

Keef
1st Mar 2015, 11:37
There are regulations (relatively new) about where they may be installed and the space there has to be round them. When the (very old) church one finally gives up, we won't be allowed to put another oil-fired boiler in the same boiler room so will be changing to electric-wet heating.

All new and replacement boilers have to be "condensing" now (for efficiency). Where the old non-condensing ones would go on for decades, condensing boilers have a scarily short life (I've come across some that were corroded through after six years). I suspect the efficiency calculations may have missed out that bit.

Gertrude the Wombat
1st Mar 2015, 13:03
Where the old non-condensing ones would go on for decades, condensing boilers have a scarily short life
We've been told that the reason ours just died (gas condensing) was that it was a bleeding edge design before they knew how to make condensing boilers properly, and that they're much better these days, honest guv.

Believe it when I see it.

late-joiner
1st Mar 2015, 18:55
All new and replacement boilers have to be "condensing" now


Not quite true. Although condensing is highly desirable, there is a process for deciding you do not have to put one in. But the installer has to know and understand it. For example for dwellings:
http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/uploads/br/BR_PDF_PTL_CONDBOILER.pdf

jimtherev
1st Mar 2015, 20:05
Where the old non-condensing [boilers] would go on for decades, condensing boilers have a scarily short life (I've come across some that were corroded through after six years). I suspect the efficiency calculations may have missed out that bit.
Bet the manufacturers didn't, though!

M.Mouse
1st Mar 2015, 20:52
My first one lasted 10 years. The stainless steel heat exchanger rotted through because of the corrosive properties of the condensate caused by virtue of its design and efficiency. When I bought it the manufacturer, a small company called Quantum who were actually fabricators and made boilers as an adjunct to that from what I can gather, told me when I telephoned to ask some questions that they used high grade stainless steel and guaranteed their heat exchangers for ten years.

When mine failed it was around that age whether under guarantee or not it would have been relatively simple to fit a replacement except Quantum were no longer in business!

I have fitted a Vaillant condensing boiler now and hope they remain around when the heat exchanger inevitably fails on this one!

P.S. the efficiency in terms of heating time and also reduced gas bills is significant.