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OldCessna
4th Feb 2015, 20:59
I am putting together a list of aviation experts for a TV network as to who they should listen to, and the others (experts/consultants) who talk a load of crap and who have no relative real work experience and whose comments should be disregarded as totally with any merit or foundation.

In the USA we have the following who talk crap:

Richard Quest, CNN
Mary Schiavo, CNN

In the USA who are very much know what they are talking about:

Greg Feith
Sully Sullenberger

Any contributions to my list would be appreciated

Thanks

MTOW
4th Feb 2015, 21:12
Not exactly what you're looking for, but this journalist, quite unusually, gets the technical stuff absolutely right in this long article about Air France 447.

Should Airplanes Be Flying Themselves? | Vanity Fair (http://www.vanityfair.com/business/2014/10/air-france-flight-447-crash)

The article is long, but if you have any non-aviation friends who are even mildly interested to know where the industry is heading, (or are concerned about aviation safety), this is the article to have them read.

Um... lifting...
4th Feb 2015, 21:25
William Langewiesche holds a FAA ATP certificate. His father was a test pilot for Cessna for many years and authored 'Stick and Rudder'.

Richard Quest has a legal degree, broadcasting experience, and a criminal record.

Mary Schiavo is a lawyer, and while she's been involved in FAA oversight, her knowledge of the nuts & bolts of flying is nil.

Greg Feith was a Senior Accident Investigator with the NTSB, and Chesley Sullenberger's CV is fairly well-known.

In general, if the words 'Aviation Expert' appear below the individual's name, you can pretty much count on their knowledge being nonexistent.

Don_Apron
4th Feb 2015, 21:30
I question a least one "consultant" SKY News have had recently. Known her years ago and how the hell she BS'd her way on the TV one can only guess. :rolleyes:

Capetonian
4th Feb 2015, 21:41
David Learmount is generally good, and on less technical matters, Simon Calder.

Richard Quest has a legal degree, broadcasting experience, and a criminal record.He knows what he's talking about, and his criminal record is irrelevant in the context ('public (pubic?) indecency' in Central Park in the middle of the night with a consenting male adult.)

CAEBr
4th Feb 2015, 22:04
'Bill Gunston is ok'

I'd rate Bill Gunston as considerably more than ok but unfortunately as he passed away in 2013 we won't see any more of his contributions.

:(

alisoncc
4th Feb 2015, 22:15
I believe that the sole criteria for recognition as an "Aviation Expert" is a minimum of five years membership of PPRuNe. That's all that is needed. So you could add my name to the list of experts. I know less than anyone else here and what I do know is forty years out of date, so I'd be perfect.

But then again going by the definition of Expert - Ex is a has been, and spurt is a drip under pressure, I can't handle the pressure these days, so perhaps not.

Um... lifting...
4th Feb 2015, 22:28
He knows what he's talking about, and his criminal record is irrelevant in the context ('public (pubic?) indecency' in Central Park in the middle of the night with a consenting male adult.)


Actually, I was speaking of his arrest for possession of crystal meth, which is extremely relevant. He can speak on subjects related to business travel and scheduling. I don't believe he holds so much as a PPL or the most basic maintenance license.

Capetonian
4th Feb 2015, 22:32
I didn't know about the crystal meth, but without condoning that (or his other behaviour) I don't see it as having any impact on his knowledge of the industry.

The original question was about 'aviation'. That's a broader sweep of the brush than 'flying'.

Um... lifting...
4th Feb 2015, 22:34
I've sat in passenger seats on numerous trains, does that qualify me as an expert on railroads?

That is analogous to the extent of Richard Quest's relevant experience.

Mary Schiavo is far more qualified than Richard Quest, though only in a very narrow lane, but she should not be put forth as an expert beyond her narrow lane. Neither should he, which is business travel, scheduling, and whoever he can finagle an interview with.

con-pilot
4th Feb 2015, 22:41
He knows what he's talking about

When it comes to him being an "aviation expert", we'll just have to agree to disagree.

Capetonian
4th Feb 2015, 22:50
If you're talking about flying aircraft from the pointy end, that's not his subject and I'm not aware that he would claim any different.

He does know about the commercial and financial aspects of the airline business, about marketing, revenue management and airline economics.

To me, that falls under 'aviation'.

pigboat
4th Feb 2015, 23:33
If you're looking for someone who knows aviation inside out there's a guy right here on PPRuNe who's been flying for 50 years, everything from crop dusters to the A320, Chuck Ellsworth.

chuks
5th Feb 2015, 06:47
I've been watching Richard Q. for years, thinking "This man is a goddam speed freak!" (Speed freak: a recreational consumer of methamphetamine sulphate, easily recognized by a somewhat disjointed, frantic even, manner of speech) He babbles! So he got busted for crank, did he? Well, good on him! That should give him some street cred. Does he have any tattoos, or some gold teeth? I think we should be told!

Never mind, never mind ... nothing to see here, please move along. We are expecting the TV news to get stuff about aviation right, trotting out their "experts" who think the plane crashed because its engines stalled?

AnAussieNut
5th Feb 2015, 07:05
What about two guys who appear in episodes of Air Crash Investigation regularly,John Nance and John Cox ?
they both seem to have long backgrounds in aviation and I think they are pretty good,but then I am far from an expert.

Cheers

Paul

ExSp33db1rd
5th Feb 2015, 07:44
Ex is a has been, and spurt is a drip under pressure,

Akcherly .... I first ( in 1961 !! ) heard that as - X is the unknown quantity and a spurt is a drip under pressure.

I guess both versions fit the bill.

vctenderness
5th Feb 2015, 10:20
Eric Moody?

He also knows his scoff as well from what I remember of him. He has dined out in style for many years on the 'worlds biggest glider':ok:

Exascot
5th Feb 2015, 10:28
Without doubt, for Aviation Medicine, Professor Mike Bagshaw: http://jarvisbagshaw.com/4_mike.html

Capot
5th Feb 2015, 16:21
I have never understood how an idiot called Chris Yates managed to get himself on a list of "aviation experts" in the UK, and stay there in spite of all the evidence to the contrary.

His comments are invariably absurd due to ignorance, as are the speculations he is always ready with following any incident about which real experts are saying nothing because they only have journalists' assumptions and interpretations, and no hard facts, to work on. Perhaps this is the reason he is called in as a reliable rent-a-mouth; he will always provide material, however stupid it might be.

The irony that escapes him, I think, is that by offering ill-informed speculation he defines himself as a non-expert; this is reinforced for those who do have some industry knowledge by his often hilarious assertions about operational and technical matters.

So, OldCessna, I'm sorry that it's only a name to avoid, rather than one to add.

Capetonian
5th Feb 2015, 16:24
Eric Moody - wasn't he the BA pilot of the 747 that lost all 4 engines' power over Indonesia?

eastern wiseguy
5th Feb 2015, 16:57
With the exception of Greg Feith (spelling?) I find the coverage on CNN to be appalling.

I listened to them dissecting an incident of a Jet Blue versus Light Aircraft the othe day. They played the tapes...at the end there was the sound of two stations transmitting at once. This was determined by the talking heads to be "the warning alarms being sounded"

SKY in the UK during the Cork crash took to numbering the runways in a random fashion and displaying them as such in their graphics.

I emailed both of them and asked them to REPORT and stop making things up.

I explained the runway designation system. They changed the graphic although whether it was a case of "post hoc ergo Procter hoc" I don't know.

No matter...I am available if CNN wants me:ok:

Capetonian...yes he was.

dazdaz1
5th Feb 2015, 17:25
Chucks...Agree with you, R Q stated on CNN three or four days after MH370 was lost, words to the effect of "the a/c will be found in the next few days" I'm sure the video clip can still be found.

gsky
5th Feb 2015, 17:57
Capot: "Chris Yates"

!00% right !

Not a clue..Makes me squirm every time I see/hear him.

dazdaz1
5th Feb 2015, 17:59
I think the problem was the lack to feather the port engine props. eg driving at 100 mph in your car, put arm out of the window horizontal, the air passes over your hand so,so. Now turn the palm of your hand vertical, yes you got it, nearly takes your arm off. As it would bring the a/c a hard turn with a prop unfeathered. Simples.

India Four Two
5th Feb 2015, 18:05
Did anyone see the American "expert" on BBC World News about a day ago, explaining in detail, exactly what went wrong in the Taipei ATR crash?

I missed his name, but he was being interviewed by Katty Kay in their New York studio. My opinion of Ms. Kay went down several notches. She just lapped up the drivel this guy was spewing. :ugh:

mickjoebill
5th Feb 2015, 21:55
The self crowned aviation expert who is subject of this recent pprune thread is investigated and on balance, pilloried.
http://www.pprune.org/pacific-general-aviation-questions/553915-please-someone-perth-gaffa-tape-gt.html#post8808126
The thread gives background and insight how someone with no apparent flying experience can elevate and ingratiate themselves to the "aviation industry" and is duly rewarded with a clutch of aviation industry awards for writing.

It takes little skill to repackage industry and airline press releases but (lack of) competency on the specialist subject is revealed in the challenging format of TV interview or news report.

Aviation Gobs on a stick spew dramatised gibberish to the thousands of relatives of those recently lost in an accident.... so instead of being a source of explanation they proffer a toxic mix of guesstimates, opinion and misinformation, resulting in confusion sidetracks and false hope, which ultimately adds to the trauma of those left behind.

Such interviews and writings are apparently driven more by self promotion than a quest to educate and communicate.
That such unethical vultures can be propped up and fed by the industry gravy train is shameful and ultimately a negative for the industry.
Accuracy, fairness and integrity are pillars of the journalism trade that should also apply to specialists and experts.

Mickjoebill

ExSp33db1rd
5th Feb 2015, 23:41
Eric Moody - wasn't he the BA pilot of the 747 that lost all 4 engines' power over Indonesia?
.......Yes

M.Mouse
6th Feb 2015, 00:38
A year or two ago BALPA contacted retired pilots (me included) asking if anybody was interested in being put forward as an 'expert' when the news organisations wanted to speak to someone following an aircraft incident or accident.

I declined knowing that news organisations are not interested in facts, few of which are known immediately following an incident/accident, and I am sure anybody refusing to be drawn into speculation would quickly be dumped as an 'expert'.

News reporting these days is dire.

mickjoebill
6th Feb 2015, 03:34
A year or two ago BALPA contacted retired pilots (me included) asking if anybody was interested in being put forward as an 'expert' when the news organisations wanted to speak to someone following an aircraft incident or accident.

Not sure if this idea needs its own thread

Perhaps pruners could care to collaborate on a Media guide to live reporting of aviation accidents ?

I'm sure FAA and EASA would be interested in endorsing it (not that it needs to be endorsed but their stamp of approval would help with the large media organisations) In the past I've had a favourable response from safety bodies at FAA and EASA in regard to writing a safety leaflet.

The guide could include basic aviation info and also offer specific list of questions, for specialists, pilots, air accident investigators and eye witnesses.

A producer could quickly pull up the relevant list and past it into a presenters teleprompter or computer.

Example telephone questions to an eyewitness of a commercial jet accident;
What distance were you from the crash when it occurred?
Have you approached the crash site?
What are the weather conditions? Is it windy? raining? hot or cold?
What is the visibility? fog?haze? night? moon?
Do commercial planes regularly fly in the area?
Describe the area in which it crashed.
Was there a sign of fire before it hit the ground?
Did you see anything fall off the aircraft as it fell?
Was it flying forward or falling vertically?
Was the nose pointed up or down?
Did it change direction before the crash?
Did you hear other aircraft nearby before or after the impact?
Did it hit any trees or buildings before it crashed?
Was it dumping fuel before it crashed?
Could you see if the undercarriage was deployed?
What is the elevation of the area?
What is forward of the crash site, open fields? lakes? buildings?
What did the plane fly over prior to the crash buildings? mountains?
Describe the resources available to local emergency services.
Describe the facilities at the nearest hospital.
Describe the access to the crash site.
How far is the nearest airport?
How long before nightfall/daybreak?
What is the weather forecast for the area?
How quickly were the emergency services on scene?
Does it look like the fire is under control, is the smoke white or black?
Were evacuation slides deployed?
How many?
Any sign of survivors?
[/I]

Separate lists relevant for rotary, light planes, military and private jets accidents.
Sub categories of;
crashes into water,
landing or take off incident at an airport
crash landing with aircraft largely intact and survivors

ect???



Mickjoebill

ExSp33db1rd
6th Feb 2015, 07:16
You've forgotten one question ..

Did the aircraft explode in the air ?

Uncle Roger, of Flight Magazine fame once declared that he was going to fly a remotely controlled aircraft stuffed with explosives over the Farnborough Air Show and detonate it in front of the assembled crowd.

The object being that 10,000 people would then be able to definitely declare that they had seen the aircraft explode in the air before crashing.

Piltdown Man
6th Feb 2015, 08:11
You beat me to it Capot. I have also complained to the BBC about using him for quotes and "expert opinion". As soon as that rubber mouthed idiot speaks you can hear he knows nothing whatsoever about aviation. WE Johns probably knew more; phrases such as "Biggles trimmed the flaps..." demonstrates his level. But worse than the fact that Chris Yates has so little aviation knowledge, he is prepared to speculate without data or facts. A true expert would say they have no data and speculation would be worthless. However, you'll be pleased to know that the BBC knows more. I was told that this man is an accredited aviation expert (whatever one of those is) and provides valuable information to viewers. What is interesting is that I haven't seen this goon on the BBC for the past few crashes.

PM

PS I did enjoy a program with CY and a hotelier, in full captain's regalia, discussing what happened to MH370 on Sky. The hotelier? He's had a penguin named after him in London Zoo. Well respected by members of his squadron apparently. But at least he's flown something, unlike matey boy.

ETOPS
6th Feb 2015, 08:15
Richard Quest was commentating on CNN during the arrival of the first service to the newly opened T5 at LHR. The aircraft was a B744 arriving from HKG and was a 299 seater in "High J" config with only 10 empty seats thus 289 pax on board.

On hearing the that the load was 289 passengers he confidently spouted " well that's pretty poor for BA - less than half full" :rolleyes:

He's a well meaning jerk who should stick to travelogues..

PS don't get me started on Al "Rise and shine"...........

GrumpyOldFart
6th Feb 2015, 12:31
The Grauniad, this morning, quoting one Thomas Wang:
(http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/feb/06/transasia-air-crash-both-engines-failed-taiwan)

“The flight crew stepped on the accelerator of engine 2 (righthand side) … The engine was still operating, but neither engine produced power.”:{

Birdstrike737
6th Feb 2015, 12:43
VERY astute gentleman: Randy Babbitt - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Randy_Babbitt)

Solid Rust Twotter
7th Feb 2015, 08:41
Accuracy, fairness and integrity are pillars of the journalism trade that should also apply to specialists and experts.

You're having a laugh, right?


Perhaps pruners could care to collaborate on a Media guide to live reporting of aviation accidents ?

Why not? Plenty of experts squabbling in R&N. Besides it would be amusing to see the handbagging the site toilets would give each other live on air...:E

MarkerInbound
7th Feb 2015, 09:46
RQ may understand the business of running an airline but not the science of flying an airplane. The problem is the media (read CNN) thinks of him as their aviation expert so trot him out for everything. It would be like me explaining how an airline finances buying a plane.


Mary Schiavo was the Inspector General of the NTSB. Sounds really great. She was head of an office of lawyers and CPAs tasked to find fraud and waste in the FAA.


Les Abend is a 777 Captain who writes for Flying magazine. CNN had him on when Malaysia 370 first went missing. About all he would say is, "We really don't know" and "We're going to have to wait to find out." They haven't had him back.

Capot
7th Feb 2015, 17:28
Plenty of experts squabbling in R&NHmmm, well, let's say a few experts and plenty of FlightSim experts...

Solid Rust Twotter
7th Feb 2015, 19:03
No sarcasm emoticon.

Fantome
7th Feb 2015, 22:53
Aviation Gobs on a stick spew dramatised gibberish to the thousands of relatives of those recently lost in an accident.... so instead of being a source of explanation they proffer a toxic mix of guesstimates, opinion and misinformation, resulting in confusion sidetracks and false hope, which ultimately adds to the trauma of those left behind.

Very well put Joe

Your list of questions that the media, and other concerned parties, should put to crash witnesses is likewise excellent. Given the propensity of witnesses, over many decades, to reporting earnestly, and often convincingly, what later proves to be entirely figments of their imaginations, you could add to the list -

Are you, and were you, cold stone sober?
Would you be willing to be assessed as to your general perceptiveness , including your visual, mental and cognitive functions?

Witnesses to horrific disasters are often in a state of shock for quite some time.