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CISTRS
26th Jan 2015, 13:33
Yalda Hakim, on reporting (BBC World Service News) the inauguration of the first woman bishop in the C of E, repeatedly referred to the ceremony taking place at YORK MINISTER.
I guess I'm just too old and crusty, but I find this lack of basic knowledge of our heritage lamentable.

Capetonian
26th Jan 2015, 14:26
I also noticed that. Infuriating, and inexcusable, like those who refer to the Eurostar Terminus as 'St. Pancreas'.

603DX
26th Jan 2015, 14:34
I know what you mean CISTRS, being of roughly the same vintage as you, but I think the young lady might be excused for not being aware of the subtle difference between Minster and Minister, in view of her early life and education:

Yalda Hakim - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yalda_Hakim)

During her rather non-standard life experiences she has managed to learn at least six languages, each of which probably has similar linguistic traps for the unwary. While she got it wrong, it is rather surprising that no-one else on the staff of the BBC World Service News was apparently "on the ball" enough to correct her mistake.

There's a lot of it about, (even within these hallowed halls of JB), and it was interesting this week to see in the careers section of the New Civil Engineer magazine a box advert by Canterbury City Council for a senior position prominently headed "Principle" Engineering Manager, and requiring candidates to hold a professional qualification from the "Institute" of Civil Engineers. Sloppy drafting and (non) checking rules nowadays, it seems ... ;)

Smudger
26th Jan 2015, 14:42
So why wasn't she corrected instead of being allowed to carry on showing her ignorance? (Not that I care in this case as religious mumbo-jumbo just goes straight over my head )

603DX
26th Jan 2015, 15:00
Mischievous minds think alike, Henry. In my post above I initially gave as examples of JB malapropisms, ordnance/ordinance, hangar/hanger, there/their, etc. Then decided I had waffled on too much already, and deleted them ... :)

Capetonian
26th Jan 2015, 15:07
I have no interest in religious matters either but that is cultural.

I watched a broadcast once from BCN, it might have been during the 1992 Olympic Games, where they continually referred to the 'Gothic' Cathedral when they meant the 'Gaudi' (Sagrada Familia).

http://cdn.enjoyourholiday.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/SagradaFamilia.jpg

Shaggy Sheep Driver
26th Jan 2015, 15:22
A couple of years ago there was a programme on BBC TV about nuclear power. Throughout the presenter kept saying 'nucular'. :ugh:

Minister instead of Minster, Nucular instead of Nuclear... How can this stuff get on air unchallenged?

CISTRS
26th Jan 2015, 15:23
At the risk of seeming un-PC, I think that the BBC have some sort of duty of getting things right, regardless of the original backgrounds of the persons concerned.
If the BBC wishes to employ persons who are not originally from Britain (as with Ms Hakim), they should have more attention to detail, with a read through "coaching" of any doubtful place names.
It is, after all the British Broadcasting Corporation.

I really don't care for the religious significance - it's to do with English place names and the standard of the presenters.

Shaggy Sheep Driver
26th Jan 2015, 15:24
Do the BBC still have a 'Pronunciation Department'? Mind you, I don't suppose that would help if the presenter simply uses the wrong word!

CISTRS
26th Jan 2015, 15:38
To people who are more involved in the C of E than myself, the error would jar even more seriously. It completely removes any credibility that the newsreader has any empathy with what he or she is reporting.

I recall that something similar happened before during a Papal visit to UK (I think) when the BBC reporter could not quote the Lord's Prayer in English - giving instead a crude translation, as if it was the first time it had been encountered.

I don't recall the precise details.

Capetonian
26th Jan 2015, 15:40
during a Papal visit to UKI thought Papal was a company that handles payments to Fleabay.

(Coat, hat ....... )

603DX
26th Jan 2015, 15:41
In a previous thread on the BBC pronunciation of place names, etc., a former BBC staff member contributed, and told us that the long-established unit responsible for coaching presenters and newsreaders had been scrapped as an economy measure.

A little while back, I think this may have been the reason why during some political demonstrations in Bahrain, the BBC news reports kept calling the Bahrain capital "Manarma". When I worked there for a while, everyone seemed to be calling it Manama, pronounced like a "Panama" hat.

P6 Driver
26th Jan 2015, 15:49
Quote:
"A couple of years ago there was a programme on BBC TV about nuclear power. Throughout the presenter kept saying 'nucular'. :ugh:

Minister instead of Minster, Nucular instead of Nuclear... How can this stuff get on air unchallenged?"


So as not to go without, the 'Muricans even voted a President who couldn't pronounce "Nuclear" into office not so long ago - and he had his finger near the red button to launch the missiles!

CISTRS
26th Jan 2015, 15:52
You mean Qatar pronounced as "Kwatarr" instead of Katar or Gatar?
I know very well what you mean, having lived in Djiddah or Jeddah, not to be confused with Cheddar.

4mastacker
26th Jan 2015, 17:03
There's a male BBC newsreader who thinks every transport aircraft is a Hercules.



oops - aviation content. :oh:

G-CPTN
26th Jan 2015, 17:07
I have seen a BBC TV weather chart promising Artic weather.

Capetonian
26th Jan 2015, 17:25
Ar(c)tic weather.
http://www.truckerswheel.com/images/Tanker-heading-south-on-Dome-Lake-between-portage-11-and-10.jpg

Krystal n chips
26th Jan 2015, 17:48
" If the BBC wishes to employ persons who are not originally from Britain (as with Ms Hakim), they should have more attention to detail, with a read through "coaching" of any doubtful place names.
It is, after all the British Broadcasting Corporation "

Ah, now we get to the crux of the matter.

Not one mention about the appointment of the first female Bishop....the event can simply be dismissed of being of no consequence, at least to some on here and no doubt in the world outside JB as well, despite the significance of the appointment.

Thus the priority is to resort to a bit of basic jingoism and how jolly beastly it is for the BBC to employ a diverse range of staff....and how a lady who is clearly more erudite than many on here, made the most damned error in broadcasting history and mispronounced the location!....stern letters to the right wing rag of choice will no doubt follow !

Makes you wonder how many of you tune in to the wireless in the hope of hearing those immortal words "This is the BBC Home Service, here is the news, read by...) insert whomever your nostalgic little hearts wish.

Allan Lupton
26th Jan 2015, 17:59
Quote
If the BBC wishes to employ persons who are not originally from Britain (as with Ms Hakim), they should have more attention to detail, with a read through "coaching" of any doubtful place names.

Those old enough will remember that one of the best of those who read the News on the Home Service during the last war was Alvar Lidell - he was the son of Swedish parents.
Born and educated in England of course so, when dragging his name into things, I'm cheating a little.

G-CPTN
26th Jan 2015, 18:05
"This is the BBC Home Service"

Followed by the Goon Show IIRC.

Was this (York Minister) programme on the World Service?

You got a better quality announcer on the Home Service (Wallace Greenslade (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wallace_Greenslade)).

BWSBoy6
26th Jan 2015, 18:15
I don't know why but it always annoys me when the BBC say CON-TRA-VERSY
I feel it should be CON-TROVERSY. Same as skedule instead of schedule. I know its the difference between American English and English English.

Mind you, I've had a lot of laughs with some American friends over the difference in language. My friends husband apologised when helping me into his car for "Touching my fanny" I assured him he hadn't and if he had, he'd have known all about it!! :}

Mrs BwsBoy

toffeez
26th Jan 2015, 18:15
I suppose it's that chick Lobby Late you're talking about.

radeng
26th Jan 2015, 18:55
In later years, 'Alvar Liddell' seemed too often to call himself 'Al Varleydell'.

Carry0nLuggage
26th Jan 2015, 19:15
It took me a couple of months and a lot of emails and phone calls to get our HR dept to correct my job title when I was last promoted. Inviting them to use a dictionary didn't work. Nor did quoting Grouch Marx - went right over their heads that one :E

G&T ice n slice
26th Jan 2015, 20:09
calling the Bahrain capital "Manarma". When I worked there for a while, everyone seemed to be calling it Manama, pronounced like a "Panama" hat.

Manamana
dat-daa-di-da-da
Manamana
dat-daa-dida
Manamana
dat-daa-didada, didada, didada, didada dat-da-da-da
(repeat)

from an early Muppet Show

G&T ice n slice
26th Jan 2015, 20:17
No-one's commented yet on whether women should be ordained.

Sacrilege.

Surely the fate that will come to York will be the same following the consecration of the apostate Jenkins.

Just this time maybe enhanced with brimstone

Sir George Cayley
26th Jan 2015, 22:24
Taxiing out recently Ground advised me to give way to "a Air Canada Airbus" :mad:

It was all I could do not to shout "an" down the microphone. Jeeez.

SGC

Tankertrashnav
26th Jan 2015, 22:39
Thus the priority is to resort to a bit of basic jingoism and how jolly beastly it is for the BBC to employ a diverse range of staff

Or ITV for that matter. K & C - I wonder if Sir Trevor MacDonald would have mis-pronounced minster. Or Moira Stewart. I rather think not.

Mr Chips
26th Jan 2015, 22:59
No-one's commented yet on whether women should be ordained.
Mad vicar certainly commented....
Pillock
video in Torygraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/religion/11369400/Rev-Libby-Lane-consecrated-as-Church-of-Englands-first-female-bishop.html)

fitliker
27th Jan 2015, 00:25
There was never anything by the wit of man so well devised ,or so sure established, which in continuance of time hath not been corrupted.


The Preface Concerning the Service of the Church .Book of Common Prayer 1662.


We have erred and strayed from thy ways like lost sheep.We have followed too much the devices and desires of our own hearts.
Morning Prayer and General Confession




Lots of good stuff in them old books :)

CISTRS
27th Jan 2015, 03:27
For some reason, I haven't been able to tune to the Home Service lately. :{

crewmeal
27th Jan 2015, 06:37
As a teacher of English as a foreign language I find the standards in the BBC have dropped over the past few years, not only with pronunciation but grammar as well. The mistakes are endless and not confined to BBC World. I wish they would do something about the background on BBC News. Whilst Simon McCoy was in full flow a woman came in carrying her shopping and was talking to a colleague. Another shot the other day showed an automatic camera moving side to side behind the news reader!

Solid Rust Twotter
27th Jan 2015, 07:22
You don't know how good you have it. Arse clenching as it is, the BBC is still streets ahead of the SABC and their own special take on the language, known as Manglish (Mangled English).


You should be dancing in't streets singing 'Hallelujah'!:}

Fitter2
27th Jan 2015, 08:51
The Preface Concerning the Service of the Church .Book of Common Prayer 1662.

We have erred and strayed from thy ways like lost sheep.We have followed too much the devices and desires of our own hearts.
Morning Prayer and General Confession


Serious thread drift here - Durham Theological College had male and female accommodation; a male found by the female sub-principal in the wrong one was accused of 'Straying like a lost sheep'. 'No madam', was the reply, 'I am following the devices and desires of my own heart'.

Some serious tongue twisters in the lectionary there. Try saying 'Lay not you treasures on Earth, where neither moth nor rust doth corrupt' after a good swig of communion wine.

603DX
27th Jan 2015, 11:58
Thus the priority is to resort to a bit of basic jingoism and how jolly beastly it is for the BBC to employ a diverse range of staff

Interestingly, the habit of the Beeb to employ the best people as they see it, irrespective of their ethnic origins, goes back quite a long way. In the mid 1950s, my school form master was telling the class of us about his recent experience at Broadcasting House in London, after recording a programme about the Oxford/Cambridge boat race. He was a former Oxford rowing blue, and was the rowing correspondent of the Observer. As a Balliol man, he was not backward in coming forward, and was relishing his tale of being invited to express his views on the current rowing scene to what he imagined was an eager nation.

In his cut-glass accent, he told us that after the recording session, he was going down in the crowded BBC lift. "And do you know, boys, I was the only English person in that lift!" (Said with an air of horrified angst.)

He probably expected that we would find this fact appalling, but not a bit of it. Teenagers tend to be rather more liberal about that sort of thing, and afterwards a couple of the class mimics were making fun of his archaic attitude to the Beeb's employment policy.

CISTRS
27th Jan 2015, 12:17
The Home Service is different from Radio Four.
Radio Four is different to the Home Service

Get it?