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rans6andrew
18th Jan 2015, 16:55
A number of things about this seem odd to me.

Why would a vessel develop a list nearly an hour after leaving it's berth on what is generally a smooth and quiet waterway? If the loading was a bit "off centre", enough to cause problems, wouldn't the list have been noticeable before casting off?

Having listed so, wouldn't heading for a quayside mooring be a better option than carrying on and beaching on a sandbank?

Now, after floating (sinking!) all over the Solent for a couple of weeks, they are attempting to pump 3,000 tons of water from the lower car deck. How did the water get in? If it "leaked" in, have they made repairs to stop more getting in as they try to pump it out? Nothing has been reported, as far as I can find.

I don't suppose we'll ever get the full story, once the "drama" part of the story is over the facts stop making the news.

Rans6............

west lakes
18th Jan 2015, 17:13
Answers to some of those questions can be found here

http://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/554010-ro-ro-car-transporters.html

rans6andrew
18th Jan 2015, 18:57
ta west lakes, overlooked the ro ro thread as it didn't suggest anything interesting to me. doh.

I don't suppose anyone on here knows about dustcarts and why they run amok occasionally? Another story in the news which lacks the critical info.

Rans6.........

G-CPTN
18th Jan 2015, 19:10
I don't suppose anyone on here knows about dustcarts
They're rubbish . . .

tony draper
18th Jan 2015, 19:54
Ships used to have various ballast tanks for when sailing light, one had to be cautious how one filled em up and in which order lest you tip yerself over,dunno what these modern bloody ships have apart from unmitigated ugliness and not enough crew
:rolleyes:

tony draper
18th Jan 2015, 22:12
Likewise Mr Basil,we had a man on the bridge and at the throttle norra feckin silicon bloody chip.:rolleyes:

Gordon17
19th Jan 2015, 11:45
Likewise Mr Basil,we had a man on the bridge and at the throttle norra feckin silicon bloody chip.

I worked for a number of years for a line that shipped cars. One day the newest ship in the fleet was being shown off to a variety of VIPS. One of the visitors kept remarking how easy it must be for the crew now that they had all the new technology. But the grizzly old Swedish captained replied, "Yes, but unfortunately nobody has modernised the sea."

The car carrier Reijin capsized as it was leaving Porto in 1998 due to incorrect ballasting. I was told at the time that the captain had over-ridden the advice of the Chief Officer and insisted on lightening the ship to lessen the draught and allow them to sail a couple of hours earlier.

G-CPTN
20th Jan 2015, 21:36
The car carrier Reijin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MV_Reijin) ran aground and capsized on its maiden voyage - one crew member died.

I suppose the captain was relieved of his wings?

Bull at a Gate
20th Jan 2015, 21:48
The MS Zenobia also capsized on its maiden voyage after ballast problems. It is now a popular wreck dive, just off Larnaca, Cyprus.

pigboat
21st Jan 2015, 13:33
Possibly given an anchor.
Before or after he was tossed overside? ;)

G-CPTN
21st Jan 2015, 19:42
He was told "You anchor!"

Super VC-10
21st Jan 2015, 23:34
The loss of Zenobia was due to a computer software issue.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MS_Zenobia

Ancient Mariner
22nd Jan 2015, 06:22
The Zenobia, built 1979, "computerised pumping system"? Raelly?
Per

HOMER SIMPSONS LOVECHILD
22nd Jan 2015, 09:01
Why would a vessel develop a list nearly an hour after leaving it's berth on what is generally a smooth and quiet waterway? If the loading was a bit "off centre", enough to cause problems, wouldn't the list have been noticeable before casting off?
If the ship was "tender" , this is entirely normal. Under slow speed manuevering leaving the berth the problem was not apparant. During the first high speed/ rate turn in more open water the natural tendency of the ship to heel outwards would reveal the stability problem.

Having listed so, wouldn't heading for a quayside mooring be a better option than carrying on and beaching on a sandbank?

No. Berthing a 50000 ton ship is an incredibly slow controled and complex task. You cant just bung it up against the nearest dock. It's not like your uncle's yacht.

Now, after floating (sinking!) all over the Solent for a couple of weeks, they are attempting to pump 3,000 tons of water from the lower car deck. How did the water get in? If it "leaked" in, have they made repairs to stop more getting in as they try to pump it out? Nothing has been reported, as far as I can find.

It leaked in through a hull breach- it has been patched- it has been reported.

Stanwell
22nd Jan 2015, 10:07
HSL,
Thank you for your restrained and courteous explanation to the OP.

I just shook my head when I saw him start the thread up - notwithstanding that there is an existing
thread on that very subject.

Are some people too lazy to use the 'search' function on this board, or what?
Seek and ye shall find..
.