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SpringHeeledJack
16th Jan 2015, 18:39
132-year-old rifle found leaning against tree in Nevada 'where it was left' - Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/usa/11350506/132-year-old-rifle-found-leaning-against-tree-in-Nevada-where-it-was-left.html)


I knew that Nevada has some remote places, but in this day and age there's not many places left that haven't been disturbed in a century.


SHJ

mikedreamer787
16th Jan 2015, 18:51
Sorry but someone left that rifle
there only a few minutes ago to
be discovered just now.

See the Time Machine thread.

tony draper
16th Jan 2015, 19:09
Fascinating,not a one in a thousand though, though they were 73s I believe,there were some picks of a Bicycle left 50 years ago lying agin a tree which had grown all round it knocking about tinternet a while back.
Probably some chap stopped for a poo leaned his piece agin a tree dropped his kecks and Mr Bear showed up waited until he had wiped his bum then had him.
Though as we always say here,we shouldn't really speculate
:rolleyes:

con-pilot
16th Jan 2015, 19:14
Probably some chap stopped for a poo leaned his piece agin a tree dropped his kecks and Mr Bear showed up waited until he had wiped his bum then had him.
Though as we always say here,we shouldn't really speculate

I don't know, sounds about as good as a theory as anything else.

After all, that rifle cost about a $1,000.00 in today's money back then and folks just didn't leave them for no reason. Getting et' by a bear would be a good reason for it to be left sitting there. :p

If humans had been involved in some way, they would have taken the rifle.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
16th Jan 2015, 19:21
Aliens! He was abducted by UFOs!
..or the Gub'mint have him in Area 51!




..hold on. There's a black helicopter arrived outside. I'll just

con-pilot
16th Jan 2015, 19:23
Aliens! He was abducted by UFOs!
..or the Gub'mint have him in Area 51!




..hold on. There's a black helicopter arrived outside. I'll just

Naw, Area 51 is shut down, the new place is called

tony draper
16th Jan 2015, 19:30
I dunno,in all the westerns I've ever seen the protocol seem to be to throw your weapon at you opponent after you have emptied the chamber or magazine,cost does not seem to enter into it.
Bit like all cowboys are obliged when crossing a desert to hopefully shake their water canteen then fling it down in disgust when they find it empty relying of course on filling their pockets with water when they stumble across a water hole over the next dune.
To be fair it is not only cowboys who do the canteen thing furrin legionaries seem prone to it as well.
:)

joy ride
16th Jan 2015, 19:36
I preeezume that the varmint put his riiiifull down on the durrrt, then the goddayamm tree jes' grewed up beneath it.

fleigle
16th Jan 2015, 20:06
All joking aside, the Great Basin National Park is a fantastic place to visit.
Driving there on Hwy 50 across Nevada towards Utah (and points east) is a magical trip.
My daughter went to Uni in Boulder, Colorado and we drove there via 50, camped in the park, marvellous!!!, a very different experience.
:ok::ok::ok:
f

tony draper
16th Jan 2015, 20:13
Always been fascinated by the History of the Old West,like most of my generation in the UK, we were bombarded wi television Westerns in the fifties and early sixties,there were buggah all else on.
:rolleyes:

con-pilot
16th Jan 2015, 20:46
Always been fascinated by the History of the Old West,like most of my generation in the UK, we were bombarded wi television Westerns in the fifties and early sixties,there were buggah all else on.

Oh yes, remember that very well. The thing that puzzled me was that 'Gunsmoke' was titled 'Gunlaw' in Englnd on TV, never did figure that out.

evansb
16th Jan 2015, 20:53
There was little or no history ever portrayed in popular media westerns. No one wanted it. It would spoil the myth. To think that Hollywood portrayed the Western Frontier as anything but Disneyland-esque is sadly delusional. Clichés, overt racism and just down right lies and gross inaccuracies is the genre's standard. Wrong tribes, wrong garments, wrong firearms, wrong weapons, wrong horses, wrong locations, wrong furniture, pretty well wrong EVERYTHING.

With possible rare exceptions such as Little Big Man and Dances with Wolves, (but even then..), the genre is absolute krap. Pulp fiction of the worst kind.

Two's in
16th Jan 2015, 21:05
There was little or no history ever portrayed in popular media westerns...

I hate to break it to you, but I suspect very few of us tuned into Gunsmoke or Rooster Cogburn (the original!) for a searing insight into the plight of indigenous polpulations in the face of white expansion and exploitation of their native lands. I tuned in to watch the guy in White hat shoot the guy in the Black hat, and of course several Indians along the way. You may be thinking of NPR or National Geographic.

con-pilot
16th Jan 2015, 21:17
the genre is absolute krap.


Pretty much that is a big yup. The 'fastest gun' gun fights are a total myth. The most common used gun of the old West was the shotgun. To be sure hand guns, pistols, were used, but the shotgun ruled. After shotguns were rifles.

tony draper
16th Jan 2015, 21:26
Documentary series on right now called Gunslingers,truth about the West and all that jazz,apparently Wild Bill Hickock drew and shot another bloke through the heart at seventy five yards wi a Navy Colt .36, I doubt the cudda hit him at seventy five yards wi that Winchester they just found.
:)
Ah! just found the photograph of that bike I mentioned earlier.
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a194/Deaddogbay/Deaddogbay002/10403538_860307140646244_1824480935198968916_n_zps99a7f892.j pg (http://s11.photobucket.com/user/Deaddogbay/media/Deaddogbay002/10403538_860307140646244_1824480935198968916_n_zps99a7f892.j pg.html)

fleigle
16th Jan 2015, 23:32
Daaad !!.....daaaad !.... me bikes stuck in the tree.........
:E:E:E
f

tony draper
16th Jan 2015, 23:51
Apparently there's nowt left of it now,all taken by souvenir hunters.
:uhoh:

onetrack
17th Jan 2015, 01:22
Here we have the first definitive archaeological evidence of the very first American to turn pacifist and turn his back on guns. This has to be an event of world significance. :)

Pinky the pilot
17th Jan 2015, 06:59
Ahh, the 1873 Winchester!:ok: Love to have one of those in my collection.

In 44WCF (44.40) of course.:D

Wonder what calibre the example found was?

jolihokistix
17th Jan 2015, 07:08
Many other possibilities, eg that the owner went up there into God's own country to die. The critters could have him after death, but not before...

gruntie
17th Jan 2015, 08:06
Clichés, overt racism and just down right lies and gross inaccuracies is the genre's standard. Wrong tribes, wrong garments, wrong firearms, wrong weapons, wrong horses, wrong locations, wrong furniture, pretty well wrong EVERYTHING.

Applies to any 'Hollywood' historical (or hysterical?) drama. Trouble is, there are x-million out there who then believe it to be true.

tony draper
17th Jan 2015, 09:08
Well when you dont have much in the way of History yet yer have to jazz it up a bit. :rolleyes:

cockney steve
17th Jan 2015, 13:38
Well when you dont have much in the way of History yet yer have to jazz it up a bit
eni fule kno that were Noo Orleens.

dazdaz1
17th Jan 2015, 15:42
Was there any cartridges found loaded in the rifle? I believe cartridges are date stamped on the rim, just a thought as to the rifles time of use.

con-pilot
17th Jan 2015, 18:06
Was there any cartridges found loaded in the rifle?

No, there was no ammunition found in the rifle. Which may be a clue as to why it was left where it was. But even with no ammunition I have trouble believing that was why such an expensive rifle was left sitting against a tree in the middle of nowhere.

Unless the owner was not physically able to carry the rifle with him anymore, due to injury or illness.

tony draper
17th Jan 2015, 18:30
Perhaps the chap was being pursued by Indians(native Americans) had not a single round of ammunition left about his person ergo he reasoned said rifle had just become a heavy metal stick and a burden so sensibly thinking he could run faster without flung it aside whereupon it landed upright agin said tree.
The possibilities are of course endless.
:rolleyes:

Solid Rust Twotter
17th Jan 2015, 18:45
...I believe cartridges are date stamped on the rim...


Not necessarily. The practice is not universal.

airship
17th Jan 2015, 19:30
Shirley, a rifle in time, saves nine?! :confused:

Pinky the pilot
18th Jan 2015, 00:41
I believe cartridges are date stamped on the rim

Only Military calibre ammo, and not all of it either.

Have heard of some sporting ammo having date headstamps but never seen any, with the exception of military calibres reloaded with non FMJ projectiles.

Espada III
18th Jan 2015, 09:05
I was doing a boundary dispute job a few years ago and along the line of the boundary was an old barbed wire fence. A large tree had grown up and one section of the wire was completely encased in the tree with the wires going in at one side and passing through to the other side as if it was the trees diameter . It proved where the boundary was.

tony draper
18th Jan 2015, 09:14
Time to worry is when you see one with your name on it.:uhoh:

Hydromet
18th Jan 2015, 09:47
A few years ago a bloke was reported in a woodworking machine as finding a pocket watch that had been left in the crotch of a tree in the 1930s, and was completely enclosed. Fortunately, when the tree was resawn, the watch was unharmed. Coincidentally, the watch had belonged to a distant, long-dead relative of mine.
It was included in the coffee table that the finder made.

joy ride
18th Jan 2015, 10:22
How does anyone know that the tree was big enough to lean a rifle on 132 years ago?

tony draper
18th Jan 2015, 10:32
132 years is just the day before yesterday for a Tree.
There are trees in me park that look no different from when I gazed up up at em spat me dummy out pointed and said goo goo goo from me pram.

An that's a long time ago. :rolleyes:

Pelikal
18th Jan 2015, 10:53
Dear Mr. Draper,

when I gazed up up at em spat me dummy out pointed and said goo goo goo from me pram.Nothing changed much then?:E Happy New Year:ok:

tony draper
18th Jan 2015, 11:32
Likewise Mr P,we struggle on.:rolleyes:

joy ride
18th Jan 2015, 13:23
Trees can indeed live to a great age, but what I am really asking is how does anyone know that the rifle was actually left against the tree? Someone might have picked it off the ground more recently and placed it there.

Um... lifting...
18th Jan 2015, 13:42
Someone might have picked it off the ground more recently and placed it there.

Indeed. Some traveler might have found it in that circumstance a mere century ago and done so, or last Tuesday.

However, one suspects the latter case unlikely. If it had lain upon the ground for a considerable length of time, it doubtless would have shown signs of it such as rust upon one side and differences in how the wood aged from the sun and moisture differences from the ground and the air over time.

onetrack
18th Jan 2015, 15:09
I read where the butt was buried quite deeply in the dirt, thus indicating a fairly lengthy period of disuse.
However, these old Winchesters were probably still in wide use in the 1940's and 1950's. We still used Model 94 Winchesters in the 1980's.
It's quite likely the owner got called away in relatively recent times, not 132 years ago.
I'm betting the owner suffered a fatal mining accident and no-one found the weapon when they cleaned up his belongings. Many prospectors camps were very rudimentary.

http://cdn.grindtv.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/rifle-1.jpg

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-apps/imrs.php?src=http://img.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp-content/uploads/sites/21/2015/01/10931501_930530573658934_4462035047591931478_o-1024x768.jpg&w=1484

dazdaz1
18th Jan 2015, 16:18
Putting on my Sherlock Holmes hat, I'd have samples taken from the barrel/breach of the rifle to determine the type of propellant used which might give a indication as to the year/last time fired.

tony draper
18th Jan 2015, 17:13
That's exactly how they found Johnny Ringo, sat down back to a tree, large caliber hole in his temple,wearing no boots and .45 Colt SA army revolver at his side and for some strange reason his gunbelt round his waist upside down,they said suicide but there were no black powder burns near his temple,we all have our suspicions.:rolleyes:

dazdaz1
18th Jan 2015, 17:30
Tony....."wearing no boots" Could it have been a Scholl foot treatment advert gone wrong?

Jackw106
26th Jan 2015, 13:35
Fort Benning GA

http://youtu.be/ghiAFqanKnc (http://youtu.be/ghiAFqanKnc)

Argonautical
27th Jan 2015, 08:47
As well as rifles, bicycles and barbed wire, trees can also grow over maize grinders. Photo from Umtali Museum, Rhodesia, 1976.

http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c2/argonautical/maize_grinder.jpg (http://s24.photobucket.com/user/argonautical/media/maize_grinder.jpg.html)