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Private jet
15th Jan 2015, 01:00
Alcohol, gambling, tranquilizers, cocaine, tobacco etc etc. Addictions of weak-willed people who need to sort themselves out.... But people that eat too much, they deserve sympathy, its an illness, they need our support (so they tell us). Does anyone sense blatant double standards here? Perhaps they should stop stuffing food in their mouths and get off their lazy backsides but in this "advanced & civilised" society it is deemed taboo to be critical of the larger person.

Lord Spandex Masher
15th Jan 2015, 01:36
If there were fewer fatties on the planet there'd be more room for everyone else.

ExSp33db1rd
15th Jan 2015, 04:58
If there were fewer fatties on the planet there'd be more room for everyone else. We don't need anymore, it's overcrowded already.

I object to the over-large ( for me ) portions of food served in many, and the USA in particular, restaurants, and have long advocated a "half price for half the quantity" policy but it doesn't seem to have caught on, some of the fast food chains do offer "senior" portions at a lower price, but not enough of them, and individually owned restaurants almost never do. They are sometimes happy to offer "childrens" meals, but why can't I take advantage of them too, I appear to be in my Second Childhood so why not? NZ restaurants aren't as quick to offer the "senior" option, and also overfeed, at least in my opinion. If you need more food, order another dish, don't force too much on everybody.

The only advantage seems to be that we can request a "doggy bag", and get two meals for the price of one by easting the rest at home on another occasion, but that's really a PITA all the time.

At least the USA restuarants are happy to let Mrs. ExS and self share a meal, but in most other countries we are looked down upon as some sort of Cheapskates. It's nothing - well not much - to do with the price, just the gluttony of it all that we object to. On one of our first 'dates' we entered a smart USA restaurant, i.e. tablecloths at lunchtime, dressed in barely more than beach gear. Mrs. ExS. looked at the menu and said " We'll have a hamburger, and split it " I nearly crawled under the table "not my idea, squire" but the black tie garbed waiter didn't bat an eyelid, split the hamburger on to two plates for us as well, and there was certainly enough food for two, for lunch. Wouldn't try it in Paris !

I can accept that gluttony becomes an addiction, like alcoholism, and other -isms, but what starts it, is anybody force fed from birth, or held down and have alcohol poured down their throat, which might start a gene reaction from then on of course, but initially a self-imposed illness.

There are few fatties in Central Africa -outside the Presidential Palace of course.

Krystal n chips
15th Jan 2015, 06:17
But people that eat too much, they deserve sympathy, its an illness, they need our support (so they tell us). Does anyone sense blatant double standards here

Whilst that's true, in part, it becomes a shade problematic with people whose genetics are such they will become obese through no fault of their own.

Having said that, those "paragons" of the food industry and their associated cousins, the advertising and marketing species plus the outlets, have a great deal to answer for with regard to the levels of obesity now seen across the UK for example.

True, nobody forces, at least directly, people to consume to excess, but the emphasis and inducements more than compensate here.

A distinct reluctance by many to simply do the minimum amount of exercise doesn't exactly help either.

That, and it seems for many middle aged males, having a body shape that would make a climber drool at the prospect,.... if it were a cornice.....is now perceived as some sort of status symbol......rather than being more indicative of a bone idle over indulgent slob more akin to a truffling pig.....my apologies to the pigs here for the comparison.

Hence we still await the photographs of several on here, some more prolific than others, whose stagnated personal development ensures they make adverse comments about women, yet are remarkably reluctant to offer photo's of their own "finely honed bodies"....given their lack of modesty in just about every other aspect of their lives, this is somewhat surprising really....unless, of course.....perish the thought here.

And finally, there's the not so little matter of......sugar.

You would have thought by now people would be aware as to how lethal this stuff is....but, sadly, because it's perceived as "nice" and "acceptable", this is not the case.

Wingswinger
15th Jan 2015, 07:21
Industrially-produced food stuffed with sugar and trans-fats is the problem. It also has additives designed to make you feel hungry again after a couple of hours so that you'll eat more of the same. The same additives are put in dog and cat food to get the animals addicted. People need to be trained not to eat the stuff. I wouldn't touch a burger at all if I were you, ExSp.

If people ate only fresh food, freshly prepared, never anything out of a packet or a tin thus avoiding hidden sugar and trans fats and indulged in regular exercise the problem would be solved. How do I know? I've done it. Several years ago I rid myself of 20 - 25lbs of unwanted flab that way. And the flab has stayed away. No fancy, faddy diets, just healthy eating and exercise. All that is needed is a life-style change. Learn to love fruit and vegetables, eat your meat lean and cut out the confectionary, fast-food and ready meals. Rocket science it ain't.

cavortingcheetah
15th Jan 2015, 07:38
Obesity.
Old people.
Alcohol.

The three reasons the British NHS is in the state it is today and why Accident and Emergency situations are so dire. No politician dares put his political life on line by tackling or even addressing these issues. There are simply far too many fat, old and alcoholic voters in the country.

Lon More
15th Jan 2015, 07:50
There are simply far too many fat, old and alcoholic voters in the country.

a lot of them are the same people who complain about the state the country is in - all those immigrants coming here, taking our benefits, etc. etc. etc. So all grist for the UKIP mill. Get rid of them and UKIP collapses. Two birds with one stone.

Wingswinger
15th Jan 2015, 07:53
Cheetah, You mean old people who are or were obese alcoholics. Those who live healthy lifestyles will not be a burden on the NHS because of a self-inflicted condition.

cavortingcheetah
15th Jan 2015, 08:22
I'm not sure how many obese alcoholics get to grow into old people.
But this raises a new point for discussion which would hinge on the question as to whether old age were a self inflicted condition. The remedy for old age is self evident.
Much of the present clutter in A&E is because old people cannot be sent home from hospital because they live alone and have no care or support facilities at home.
Does this open an argument for compulsory euthanasia for single people at sixty five?

treadigraph
15th Jan 2015, 08:32
Does this open an argument for compulsory euthanasia for single people at sixty five?

Dunno about decluttering A&E, but that would certainly leave a large hole in Jetblast! :{

CargoMatatu
15th Jan 2015, 08:36
:D:D:D:D:D:}

cavortingcheetah
15th Jan 2015, 08:37
All right then, single people over sixty five who are not tax payers or recipients of an approved pension scheme.

Capetonian
15th Jan 2015, 08:42
I know at least two people who are obese as a result of medical conditions over which they have no control. Both exercise regularly, possibly insufficiently, but doing so is a huge effort for them, as are things we take for granted such as getting out of a chair and walking to the shops.

I know others who are obese through their own gluttony and lack of self-control. They eat huge portions of food, snack on sweet goodies throughout the day, and some do very little physical exercise beyond opening the cake box followed by opening their cakehole.

I have some sympathy for both groups, the former for obvious reasons and the latter because, if that's how they are, they should be allowed to indulge their greed but pay the price for it.

That price should be paying for a larger seat/excess weight when they travel, as an example. Their insurance premiums should be loaded too, as should be the case for smokers, heavy drinkers and others who choose to self-harm.

I also firmly believe that restaurant portions should come in at least two sizes, I frequently find, as ExSp33db1rd points out, that portions are too large, and I object to the waste that this can entail. In South Africa, even my son, who like most teenagers has a healthy appetite, is often unable to finish portions.

Mostly I find that a request to share a main course, or typically two starters and two mains between three of us, is dealt with politely. The exceptions to that have been in Italy (edit : Ticino, the Italian part of Switzerland) somewhat surprisingly, and less surprisingly in France, but then the sneering 'et avec ca?' is normal there. It's not about saving money, it's about avoiding waste and above all, not eating more than is healthy.

I'm going out today for lunch to an Indian restaurant. I know that if we order the inexpensive 'set menu' for lunch we will be petitioned for poppadoms and nan-bread, all of which inflate the bill and the waistline.

Wingswinger
15th Jan 2015, 08:44
All right then, people who are not tax payers or recipients of an approved pension scheme.

There, fixed it. Ayn Rand would approve. :} After all, all politics is about how much those who are gainfully employed shall be taxed to support those who aren't. :E

joy ride
15th Jan 2015, 08:59
I reckon I must have about 60 channels on my TV's Freeview.
When I spin through the channels I notice that about 80% to 90% are broadcasting brain-dead American programmes and films. On the commercial channels over half the ads are for food; not basic foodstuffs, but all manner of processed high fat, high sugar junk food and luxury food. Loads of ultra-close-up shots of some sort of meatery or cakery being sliced in slow motion, with some oily or sweet gloop oozing out.

There are countless Cookery contest programmes, where cooking and eating is portrayed as a titantic battle for perfection and triumph, rather than a simple pleasure.

There are countless programmes about making cakes and chocolate into all manner of fanciful shapes and colours.

There are countless programmes like Man v Food, about gluttons pigging down enormous quantities of ultra-high protein high fat and high sugar food.

Now that our culture is dominated by American TV and films, I am not at all surprised that a big chunk of our population has gone the same way as a big chunk of the American population.

mikedreamer787
15th Jan 2015, 09:11
I got no qualms about calling obese fat slobs "obese fat slobs" if they cross my path and get under my nose.

Effluent Man
15th Jan 2015, 09:17
It's quite complex. My dad was six feet tall and ten and a half stone (67kg) all his life. I am two inches taller and at seventeen I was fifteen stone. Over the next forty five years I have gained a further stone. I swim a mile a day and eat a pretty decent diet with a slight weakness for cheese but no snacks and little alcohol,maybe half a bottle of wine a week.

Now clearly if I did eat a bad diet I would be obese. I manage to keep my BMI in a range of 27-28.But the swimming has given me quite heavy shoulder muscles.Presumably if I stopped this would reduce my BMI.

Seldomfitforpurpose
15th Jan 2015, 09:21
With only a few medical exceptions you are what you eat. Mrs SFFP and I are following the 5-2 diet so limit our calories on 2 days to 500. This is not as easy as it sounds however with a bit of planning it is not that difficult to achieve without actually starving yourself.

A porridge sachet for breakfast made with water instead of milk takes 2 mins in a microwave and is only 100 cals.

A bowl of home made veg soup for lunch works out about 100 cals.

Homemade Veg curry with cauliflower rice and a splash of natural yoghurt is around 250 cals and because it was bulked out with squash and mushrooms was absolutely plentiful.

The above is neither time consuming or expensive.

Eating sensibly and healthily is not that difficult to achieve and I really don't buy into this notion that people are too busy to be able to do so. If you have time to go to a store and buy rubbish you have to go to a store and buy healthy.

Very little in the way of healthy food takes much in the way of prep or in actual cooking time but if you are too lazy to do so is it a wonder you get fat.

MagnusP
15th Jan 2015, 10:05
Cape's comments on Italy come as a surprise. At lunchtime in the area we visit annually, an order placed for something "diviso in due, per favore" is always met with a smile and the immediate provision of two plates and two sets of cutlery before the food arrives.

K'n'C's usual sneering regarding sugar displays either a disregard for, or an ignorance of, the essential role played by many sugars. I suggest avoiding all polysaccharides, only if the last will & testament is up to date. :rolleyes:

Capot
15th Jan 2015, 10:18
Whilst that's true, in part, it becomes a shade problematic with people whose genetics are such they will become obese through no fault of their own.Yeah, yeah; the problem is that this excuse is seized on by 98.64% of obese lardasses who convince themselves that there's no point in eating less, so why bother, eh?

The source of all body fat, visceral etc etc, is food. At the risk of offending the usual groups who are standing by, eager and ready, to be offended on someone else's behalf, I will point out that there were no fat prisoners in the concentration camps.

The remaining 1.36% of obese lardasses may have a medical disposition towards obesity, but even for them eating less food will sometimes work wonders.

charliegolf
15th Jan 2015, 10:24
Yeah, yeah; the problem is that this excuse is seized on by 98.64% of obese lardasses who convince themselves that there's no point in eating less, so why bother, eh?

The source of all body fat, visceral etc etc, is food. At the risk of offending the usual groups who are standing by, eager and ready, to be offended on someone else's behalf, I will point out that there were no fat prisoners in the concentration camps.

The remaining 1.36% of obese lardasses may have a medical disposition towards obesity, but even for them eating less food will sometimes work wonders.

:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D

cavortingcheetah
15th Jan 2015, 10:33
Here's a good idea although it's far too lenient. They should run gamma tests on all suspect patients, as well as the usual pre-surgery whole blood tests, then apply the same restrictions.

______________________________________________________

NHS Devon restricts treatment for smokers and obese patients

By Mblazeby | Posted: December 04, 2014
Smokers and obese patients in Devon are having their treatment withheld until they commit to making lifestyle changes.
Under the new rules, patients with a BMI of 35 or more will have to lose five per cent of their body weight to qualify for treatment.
Meanwhile, smokers must demonstrate their willingness to make drastic changes to their habits by quitting smoking for at least eight weeks before surgery.
The NHS in Devon has brought in the new measures to combat its £14.5 million deficit.

Wingswinger
15th Jan 2015, 10:41
It's a start but does it go far enough. How on earth do surgeons cope with operating on lardbutts?

mikedreamer787
15th Jan 2015, 10:43
https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=nLRQvK2-iqQ#t=212

Wingswinger
15th Jan 2015, 10:47
Do you think he modelled his act on Billy Connelly's?

Checkboard
15th Jan 2015, 10:50
Lovely understanding and empathy shown in this thread. :rolleyes:

The regulation of hunger and body weight is handled by a number of interrelating hormone and nerve mechanisms in the body. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leptin

Studies continue on how these mechanisms are defective in the obese - why their higher fat stores don't signal "stop eating" in the long term, or a full stomach doesn't do the same in the short term.

People who struggle with weight have heard "You can't possible still be hungry after eating that." all their life - which would suggest that the thin people asking the question have a different internal experience, not better self control.

Capetonian
15th Jan 2015, 10:50
Cape's comments on Italy come as a surpriseI've edited my post, because thinking about it, I realised that this happened in Canton Ticino, in Capolago which is just inside Switzerland at the southern end of Lake Lugano.
In Italy, I don't recall having a problem and we do eat out there quite a lot.

Capot
15th Jan 2015, 11:03
Studies continue on how these mechanisms are defective in the obese - why their higher fat stores don't signal "stop eating" in the long term, or a full stomach doesn't do the same in the short term.You know what? Most of us have something called a "brain" which tells us that no matter how much we'd love to have-another-Danish,-just-a-bit-of-cream,-I-know-I-shouldn't, if we do have it we'll get fat, so we don't have it.

In other words, our stomachs are sending a signal to keep eating, but because we are sentient human beings to whom God has given at least one brain cell we are able to ignore the signal. It's the same with sex, isn't it; what distances us from other animals is that our brains say "NO!", while our bodies are signalling "PASS ON YOUR GENES - NOW!" when we espy a nice example of the other gender.

If your excuse works for lardasses, it works for rapists,male and/or female. Did you really intend that?

Checkboard
15th Jan 2015, 11:05
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reductio_ad_absurdum

mikedreamer787
15th Jan 2015, 11:11
Do you think he modelled his act on Billy Connelly's?

Yeah I briefly thought that too.

Capot
15th Jan 2015, 11:26
Checkboard; Yes, well done, very funny, good College Debating Society riposte; now, how about dealing with the very valid point that was, quite deliberately, illustrated as well as explained by the "Reductio ad Absurdum"?

Seldomfitforpurpose
15th Jan 2015, 11:28
People who struggle with weight have heard "You can't possible still be hungry after eating that." all their life - which would suggest that the thin people asking the question have a different internal experience, not better self control.


Tosh, after a fasting day, only consuming 500 calories, I am often still hungry but because I have a bit of will power I manage to not eat anything else. None of this is rocket science :rolleyes:

cavortingcheetah
15th Jan 2015, 11:43
(How on earth do surgeons cope with operating on lardbutts? )

I'm reliably informed that they use flensing knives and a system of screw staples to facilitate attaching the fat roll folds to special racks placed vertically in line with the patient. The depth of fat regulates the number of racks required and the height of the adjustable stools on which they surgeons have to stand in order to access the intestinal morass that forms the quivering core of the obese patient.

Here's a picture of an early pair of surgical inspection glasses, invented in Germany after much research on fat rats.

http://www.eyeglasseswarehouse.com/images/3113-17-7b.jpg

DType
15th Jan 2015, 12:06
Having been put on steroids for polymyalgia nine months ago, I now have a LITTLE sympathy for the obese. Steroids don't directly make you put on weight, but my appetite is now voracious and I am on the "see food" diet.
Still do my hill walking, but the sooner I can get off steroids the happier I'll be.

probes
15th Jan 2015, 12:54
"see food" diet :D

I just drink water when I'm hungry about after six or so at night. It's not too excruciating: you just decide not to eat a crumb and drink water when you'd like some. It's supposed to be good as well (water, that is). Definitely feels better.

treadigraph
15th Jan 2015, 12:59
Mother and daughter weigh a total of 43 stone and get £34k a year handouts, but refuse to diet (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/11347454/Mother-and-daughter-weigh-a-total-of-43-stone-and-get-34k-a-year-handouts-but-refuse-to-diet.html)

:mad:

rgbrock1
15th Jan 2015, 13:05
Ah yes Joy Ride, blame us Americans for you all starting to become fat slobs. it's all our fault. We force you to eat all that nasty food as well.

I reckon I must have about 60 channels on my TV's Freeview.

But you don't see a correlation between the above sentence and fat slobbishness?

Seldomfitforpurpose
15th Jan 2015, 13:10
I reckon I must have about 60 channels on my TV's Freeview.

But you don't see a correlation between the above sentence and fat slobbishness?


Now where do you think we got the idea of having all that many channels to watch from.........................................:p:p:p

Shaggy Sheep Driver
15th Jan 2015, 13:10
I just drink water when I'm hungry about after six or so at night. It's not too excruciating: you just decide not to eat a crumb and drink water when you'd like some.

I like it! Beer is almost all water, isn't it? :ok:

Seldomfitforpurpose
15th Jan 2015, 13:13
I like it! Beer is almost all water, isn't it? :ok:


Cider is water and apples so cannot be doing me any harm at all :ok:

rgbrock1
15th Jan 2015, 13:14
I firmly believe that you can eat whatever the hell you want to it, within reason, as long as what goes down your gullet is compensated for by exercise. And plenty of water. Water is key.

probes
15th Jan 2015, 13:14
Wise words, wise words. And if it starts feeling too liquidoc [=full of liquid] inside, have it concentrated (vodka). :E

rgbrock1
15th Jan 2015, 13:16
probes wrote:

liquidoc

new word probes? Did you just invent it? :}:E:}:E

Stanwell
15th Jan 2015, 13:26
There's not many vitamins in beer...
That's why you've got to drink a lot of it.

rgbrock1
15th Jan 2015, 13:31
Ah, but there are quite a few vitamins in beer, Stanwell. One of the reasons why bier/beer in Germany is classified as a foodstuff and not necessarily an alcoholic drink. Some Germans refer to Bier as flueusig Brot - liquid bread.

Prosit! :ok::ok::ok:

probes
15th Jan 2015, 13:36
new word probes? Did you just invent it?
it is, and no, not 'just'. It's a joint invention with a US PeaceCorps volunteer and means 'getting more liquid' or 'feeling more liquid'. Happened several years ago and I don't even remember what the liquefying agent was. :uhoh:

fitliker
15th Jan 2015, 14:36
doc : drug of choice


therefor liquidoc makes perfect sense :)

Checkboard
15th Jan 2015, 16:42
Capot - the argument presented by most here appears to be:

Premise 1: I am human, and my hunger (and thus food intake) is easily controllable.
Premise 2: Fat people are human, yet do not control their hunger.

Conclusion: Fat people are lazy slobs who have given in to gluttony, this indicates a lack of moral fibre.


I am suggesting that the first premise is flawed, and thus the argument is unfounded. I am suggesting that the fact that these people obviously do not control their hunger may be evidence that their experience of hunger is different to yours, and that there is some science to support that.

To say that a person's body fat percentage is directly related to their personal willpower is to say that Michael Moore never made a documentary, Oprah Winfrey is a no-body in showbiz, Ronaldo can't play soccer, John Daly can't play golf, William Perry was useless at the Superbowl, James Joule didn't discover the law of conservation and energy, Tom Kerridge didn't work for a Michelin star ...

probes
15th Jan 2015, 16:50
Checkboard, you're mistaken. No-one claimed it is easily controllable. Far from that. There was a model (or was it an actress?) who said - nothing tastes as good as being slim.
Having lost more than 10 kg some 3 years ago, I can say - the horror of feeling it under my skin again is worse than any hunger/craving for food.

Checkboard
15th Jan 2015, 17:07
OK probes - change "easy for you, hard for them" to "tough for you, impossible for them" - it's the same argument, and the same fallacy to state that all fat people are lazy gluttons.

Octopussy2
15th Jan 2015, 17:36
The quote is from Kate Moss (although maybe someone said it before her).

I'm always bemused by the fear and loathing that any discussion of excess weight generates. I understand it in the context of the SLF "I don't want you occupying half my seat" rants (indeed, I probably feel the same), but the level of castigation/sanctimoniousness in other contexts is inexplicable to me.

As Checkboard has pointed out, things may be more complicated than first appear. A further issue is that, unlike any other substance, food cannot be given up altogether, so the dieter has no "cold turkey" option, which is generally the most successful when dealing with other addictions.

On a more trivial note, SFFP how are you finding the 5:2 diet? (is it working? How much have you lost - if not too personal?)

Capot
15th Jan 2015, 17:40
Checkboard; Hmmm...as someone else said, tosh.

It is perfectly possible that some people, for whatever reason, may find to harder to control their urge to eat than others, but to argue that those people are physically incapable of controlling them no matter how much they want to is nonsense, other than in cases of mental illness.

The thread is straying into the territory of the apparent need that many people have to blame anyone or anything for their stupidity. "I just can't help it" is the cry, when the reality is they don't want to.

Lack of sympathy, tolerance, kindness? Yes. Obese people are fat due to their own self-indulgence (with rare exceptions); why do they expect my sympathy?

Checkboard
15th Jan 2015, 17:50
It is perfectly possible that some people, for whatever reason, may find to harder to control their urge to eat than others, but to argue that those people are physically incapable of controlling them no matter how much they want to is nonsense, other than in cases of mental illness. If you can admit that some people may have a different experience, then you can sympathise, no?


And they don't expect your sympathy, but perhaps they can expect reasonably polite behaviour (i.e. NOT pointing the finger and screaming "GLUTTON") in the same way that you shouldn't be pointing the finger at a person in a wheelchair and shouting "cripple!" (although, perhaps you do that, too.)

Seldomfitforpurpose
15th Jan 2015, 18:06
Good grief, a cripple can't stop being a cripple where as glutton can stop being a glutton, where is the difficulty in understanding that :ugh:

Seldomfitforpurpose
15th Jan 2015, 18:11
On a more trivial note, SFFP how are you finding the 5:2 diet? (is it working? How much have you lost - if not too personal?)


Early days, only our second week. Lost 4 pounds so far but whether it stays off over the weekend is yet to be seen. From those we have spoken to its a 'long run' kind of thing and we have found it is actually not that much of a hardship on the 2 fasting days. We are going to give it a couple of months to see if we benefit :ok:

rgbrock1
15th Jan 2015, 18:24
(i.e. NOT pointing the finger and screaming "GLUTTON")

I would never do something like that. However, what my mind thinks when I see a jumbo-sized lard ass is another thing entirely. :}

probes
15th Jan 2015, 18:37
A mother and daughter who reportedly weigh a total of 43 stone and receive £34,000 a year in handouts say they'd rather be happy and on benefits than depressed and thin.
Janice Manzur, 44, and her daughter Amber, 25, use mobility scooters as their weight means they struggle to get around, while Janice's home in Kirkcaldy, Fife, has been modified by the council to accommodate her disability.
Mother-of-two Janice has been claiming benefits since 2006, while her daughter has not worked for more than two years.
Together they reportedly receive around £33,600 in benefits a year, which is the equivalent of someone earning £46,000 a year before tax.
But the pair have no plans to diet, and say they are happy being overweight, despite the risks of obesity-related health issues.
'I'd rather my daughter live life on benefits being fat and happy than depressed and thin,' Janice, who weighs 26st, told The Sun's Jenny Francis.
As well as her scooter, Janice gets around in a wheelchair-accessible Fiat Qubo car, worth around £15,000, which she gets £200 a month in benefits for.
There is a disabled parking bay outside her home and a ramp has been placed outside her house, making it easier for her to access.
She is living with a number of weight-related conditions, including diabetes, high cholesterol and angina, according to the newspaper.
She says she has tried to lose weight in the past, but was unable to shift the pounds and when she asked a doctor about the possibility of having weight loss surgery, such as a gastric band, was told she was too overweight. She then decided to give up attempts to diet.
She was working as a manager in a call centre, but left because of weight-related health problems.
After winning a tribunal case where it was argued she could work if she lost weight, she now receives £620 in Employment Allowance and £320 in Disability Allowance every month, as well as £300 for rent.
'I've always been big and I'm too fat to work, so I have a genuine disability. I should be miserable but I'm happy. I know this is the way I'm meant to be.'Janice and Amber Manzur would 'rather be fat on benefits than thin and working' | Daily Mail Online (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2909810/We-d-fat-benefits-working-Mother-daughter-weigh-total-43-STONE-boast-matching-mobility-scooters-receive-34-000-year-handouts.html)

and no, I don't hate anyone, call anyone names or tell them what I think.

Loose rivets
15th Jan 2015, 19:28
But a tubby tummy is not always bad:



http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v703/walnaze/Smilies/Onesizefitsall2_zps19539aee.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/walnaze/media/Smilies/Onesizefitsall2_zps19539aee.jpg.html)




And bottoms - don't keep them to yourself.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v703/walnaze/Smilies/Onesizefitsall_zps0aa92c7f.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/walnaze/media/Smilies/Onesizefitsall_zps0aa92c7f.jpg.html)

rgbrock1
15th Jan 2015, 19:29
Gee, thanks for the two images Loose. Time for me to buy some eye bleach. :=

wings folded
15th Jan 2015, 20:46
And somebody got banned for showing ample but covered pectoral appendages?

con-pilot
15th Jan 2015, 21:27
LR

What has been seen, can never be unseen. :{

Krystal n chips
16th Jan 2015, 06:35
" K n C's usual sneering...etc, etc "

I apologise unreservedly for any trauma I may have caused you by the revelation that the gap of dietary knowledge is comparable to the Grand Canyon.

By way of atonement therefore.....

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2013/mar/20/sugar-deadly-obesity-epidemic

Alternatively, please enter "is sugar dangerous" ( or similar terms ) into a well known search engine. The results, once your trauma has abated of course, make for sobering reading.

"More fruit juice vicar ? "

MagnusP
16th Jan 2015, 08:46
I call BS on that, K'n'C. Refined sugar, sucrose, is undoubtedly thoroughly harmful to health, but there are many other sugars that are essential for survival. Try surviving without glucose, but don't expect any sympathy when your hypoglycaemic coma kicks in.

cattletruck
16th Jan 2015, 10:00
Where I currently work there is a really nice food mall. Unfortunately I regularly see a lot of really obese people in there, I think they love the joint.

I should point out that there are a number of banks and public service departments around the area. Spending your expendable income on food does have it's down side.

On another note, I started my working life as a public servant until this awfully obese ministerial adviser was given the authority to bully anyone he liked. Unfortunately as a "doer" I ended up in his sights, it was horrible, fatso and his low self esteem did a lot of damage in that place, and how do you explain that to such a selfish low life? All I can say is that it took a very skilled and righteous career public servant to finally get rid of the fat ugly prick.

Wodrick
16th Jan 2015, 10:18
Here in the third world sharing and 'media ración' are quite common which helps, the Spanish and Germans(who are in abundance) eat with their eyes.