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stagger
4th Jan 2015, 21:52
Obviously in the news since this one has been grounded in the Solent - but does anyone know what the numerous white boxes on the top deck are?

http://www.islandecho.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/I14_7112.jpg

I was thinking they must be ventilation structures for the lower decks - but they don't seem to have any openings (e.g. see example below)....

http://gcaptain.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/worlds-largest-roro-car-carrier.png

Any ideas?

Ancient Mariner
4th Jan 2015, 22:07
Hiding places for embarrased deck monkeys?
Or maybe ventilation structures for the lower decks. ;)
Five GBP on the former.
Per

ShyTorque
4th Jan 2015, 22:18
They are hives for bees.

Sea bees, obviously.

TWT
4th Jan 2015, 22:56
They're mail boxes rented to the pilots ( both maritime and helicopter).

For confidential correspondence.

Capetonian
4th Jan 2015, 23:13
Please keep this confidential.

Now that the secret of aircraft spraying chemtrails has been revealed, it's been decided to do it from vessels at sea. That's what those boxes are for.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
4th Jan 2015, 23:19
http://www.walleniuslines.com/Global/FleetImages/Faust%204444.pdf

Cargo Ventilation
Fans are distributed along the vessel on upper deck providing
good ventilation during loading/discharging. In the
main holds air can be changed at least 20 times per hour.

The vents can remain closed at sea.

p.s. It's Ro-Ro-Ro Roll On/Roll Off/Roll Over ;)

KelvinD
4th Jan 2015, 23:38
It is good to see the Daily Wail doesn't reserve its hyperbole for aviation "dramas". They are saying this ship "has a maximum weight of almost 158,000 tonnes".
Well, around 51,000 tons actually.

galaxy flyer
5th Jan 2015, 00:18
Anything on how many cars on board and status?

GF

avturboy
5th Jan 2015, 01:03
Anything on how many cars on board and status?

GF

According the BBC news website the vessel was about one third full and carrying about 1400 vehicles.

Noah Zark.
5th Jan 2015, 01:17
Also, apparently, some 'construction machinery'.

Hempy
5th Jan 2015, 01:18
Was 1/3 full (1400 cars), deliberately grounded on the sandbank when it started to list. No apparent damage to hull, salvage underway.

Mostly Harmless
5th Jan 2015, 01:30
Airbags, in case of a roll-over?

pigboat
5th Jan 2015, 03:15
That thing didn't run aground. It's so fugly it tried to roll over and die.

SpringHeeledJack
5th Jan 2015, 08:06
Apparently both the Captain and the Harbour Pilot decided to beach it deliberately once the list became too great. I don't suppose that many of the cars are still in pristine condition anymore, can't imagine that they're individually tied down inside. First time you see one of these eminently practical but hideously ugly vessels it takes you back. Also the second and third :p


SHJ

probes
5th Jan 2015, 08:14
Now that the secret of aircraft spraying chemtrails has been revealed, it's been decided to do it from vessels at sea. That's what those boxes are for.
surely that would be chemwaves, then?

joy ride
5th Jan 2015, 08:25
I think the boxes are cells for transporting monks who have been refused on to UA planes.

probes
5th Jan 2015, 08:33
and it's not grounded, just banking? :E

merch
5th Jan 2015, 08:45
KD The 51000 tons is Gross Tons which is a volume, as is the net tonnage. Broadly speaking the gt is the internal volume and the nt is space for carrying cargo. The weight of ship is the displacement tonnage. (The weight of the water it displaces).

Merch

Ancient Mariner
5th Jan 2015, 08:51
SpringHeeledJack: can't imagine that they're individually tied down inside
They are, unthinkable not to.
3 mins, 25 into below video.

Someone has messed up their ballasting or screwed up otherwise.
Had it happen to me on a Ro-Ro vessel while loading, unloading somewhere UK.
Starboard pilot door open for bunkers, water, whatever, tide fell, door caught on pier, vessel listed port, Chief Mate ballasted starboard tanks, vessel listed more to port, Chief Mate continued ballasting starboard, etc.
Chief Mate now sweating copious amount of yesterday's alcohol consumption, continues futile activity.
It is now becoming uncomfortable in engine control room, coffee and cigarette ash being spilled, difficult for legs to remain on table, one suffers daylight to inspect.
Upon entering main deck, hinges on pilot door finally give in. Vessel immediately snaps starboard and rests on pier. Chief Mate suffers major breakdown, yours truly need new underwear, Chief Mate new dignity, doesn't like being laughed at.
Welded door temporarily back in place for safe(ish) crossing of the North Sea. Fixed it next port, good thing as it was needed for evacuation wife and daughters a few months later when we ran aground and sank a little.
Per

watch?v=T0H8TgWX-lY

Fliegenmong
5th Jan 2015, 08:58
"and sank a little." :D

Ancient Mariner
5th Jan 2015, 09:09
Fliegenmong: "and sank a little."
Ripped the bottom open on some rocks, lost the prop and stabs, towed into the port of Skärhamn, which we were about to enter anyway, at 16 knots. :eek:
Not our destination, but close enough. Sank on sandy bottom, managed temporary repairs before before towed into floating dock in Norway for final repairs.
A truly memorable Yuletide for my wife and daughters, then aged 10 and one.
The people of Skärhamn will probably never forget the sight they woke up to on Christmas day.
Per

Fareastdriver
5th Jan 2015, 10:27
I did a Three Gorges Tour in a three deck riverboat on the Yangze River before it became an estuary of the dam. We were on the final bit to Wushan when I looked over the river and wondered why the river traffic was all over the other side. Looking down one could see the ship passing over very large rocks with very little clearance. Soon after that there was a quiet rumbling noise.

The captain then had to beach it, and his career, on a convenient bit of sand on the riverbank. The hull had flooded so the airconditioning and water systems were out of action. We had to spend an uncomforttable night until we were taken off by a fleet of hydrofoils.

At least the beer was free.

Gordon17
5th Jan 2015, 10:33
All the cars (and any other cargo) are tied down.

An NYK ship, the Reijin capsized as it was leaving Porto in 1998 and that was due to incorrect ballasting. I expect this was also.

About 15 years ago when I worked for Wallenius Lines we had a couple of GM cars on a ship going backwards and forwards across the Atlantic for about a year to assess whether the tie down caused any damage to the cars.

Mikehotel152
5th Jan 2015, 10:37
I presume the straps will be sufficiently robust to keep the cars/cargo in place during rough seas, but how about with a 50 degree list?

G-CPTN
5th Jan 2015, 10:54
The tie-downs (in the video) are simply using the towing-recovery hook, not the more secure method used on truck recovery where a strap is placed over the wheel (usually at least two wheels, sometimes all four).

A single simple strap would not restrain a vehicle at extreme angles.

Over a certain angle of lean, the weight of well-secured freight will act to increase the tilt.

G-CPTN
5th Jan 2015, 11:35
A number of Rolls-Royce and Bentley cars are believed to be on the vehicle carrier.

G&T ice n slice
5th Jan 2015, 12:59
Also, apparently, some 'construction machinery'.

ahhh 'construction machinery' (in quotation marks)

would this be 155mm self-propelled "construction machinery", or perhaps heavy MBT "construction machinery" or possibly light ARV "construction machinery"?

Possibly accompanied with "construction machinery spares and parts" including HE "machinery spares", armour-piercving "machinery spares" and/or incendiary "machinery spares".

beaufort1
5th Jan 2015, 13:10
I remember the 'Tricolor' which sank in the English Channel in Dec. 2002. She was carrying nearly 3,000 BMW's and Volvo's. They had to cut her up in slices and removed her in pieces. I wonder if Smit International will be brought in for this one as well.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=adr4jF3a_9Q

Gordon17
5th Jan 2015, 13:40
The tie-downs (in the video) are simply using the towing-recovery hook, not the more secure method used on truck recovery where a strap is placed over the wheel (usually at least two wheels, sometimes all four).

I think that's because straps over the wheels let the cars' bodies move about a lot and possibly hit each other. Strapping down the body and compressing the suspension stops this.

G-CPTN
5th Jan 2015, 13:41
Although there is no evidence that such vehicles were included on this vessel, Terex transport their mining dumptrucks from their factory at Motherwell (Scotland) down to Southampton for onward shipping to customers across the World.

Regular conveys of trucks carrying these machines can be seen heading south on M6.

JCB also ship most of their export orders through Southampton using these vehicle carriers, so it is not just cars and vans.

Nissan use the Port of Tyne for import and export of their vehicles, but Jaguar, Land Rover and BMW Mini are shipped from Southampton for markets south of Britain.

Ancient Mariner
5th Jan 2015, 14:23
Gordon17: I think that's because straps over the wheels let the cars' bodies move about a lot and possibly hit each other. Strapping down the body and compressing the suspension stops this.

Try as you might, but you'll be hard pressed to compress both the suspension and the tires completely. Enough Gs and and it's bye, bye trailers and cars. I've seen enough of them disappearing over the ship's side.
If I can dig them out, I'll scan and post some pics from a ship called "Norwegian Challenger" and boy, was she not.
The insurance company gave us the "Most (or was it First?) Container(s) to Reach the Beach " award.
Her problem? Too stable.
Per

G-CPTN
5th Jan 2015, 15:02
We can confirm that we do have roughly 1200 Jaguar and Land Rover products aboard the stricken ship. Until such time as the salvage operation can safely begin, we can tell you nothing further about the implications for the cargo. However, the most important consideration is that the crew are safe and well. – Spokesperson for Land Rover UK

SpringHeeledJack
5th Jan 2015, 15:06
ahhh 'construction machinery' (in quotation marks)

would this be 155mm self-propelled "construction machinery", or perhaps heavy MBT "construction machinery" or possibly light ARV "construction machinery"?

Possibly accompanied with "construction machinery spares and parts" including HE "machinery spares", armour-piercving "machinery spares" and/or incendiary "machinery spares".

Ha ha, that's exactly the thought process that went through my cynical mind when that was mentioned on the news last night :D :} I'm sure that it was just what it said on the tin in reality, machinery for construction. No doubt being more robust it will survive the tipping with only a few scratches that will buff out.


SHJ

Mariner9
5th Jan 2015, 15:11
I remember the 'Tricolor' which sank in the English Channel in Dec. 2002.

Dubious claim to fame...
The wreck of the Tricolor was then hit by the cargo ship Nicola, and subsequently by the tanker Vicky. I attended on the damaged Vicky on behalf of one of the parties involved to oversee the cargo transfer :8

dazdaz1
5th Jan 2015, 15:59
I don't think the listing, then the deliberate grounding was caused by the cargo shifting. My guess would be someone making a megga cock-up with the ships ballast tanks.

beaufort1
5th Jan 2015, 16:04
Mariner9 I can remember the French Cross stations issuing Nav. Warnings, the wreck was marked and ships still ploughed into the Tricolor. I think in the end they had to position warships to warn vessels away from her.

barry lloyd
5th Jan 2015, 16:25
Quote:

ahhh 'construction machinery' (in quotation marks)

would this be 155mm self-propelled "construction machinery", or perhaps heavy MBT "construction machinery" or possibly light ARV "construction machinery"?

Possibly accompanied with "construction machinery spares and parts" including HE "machinery spares", armour-piercving "machinery spares" and/or incendiary "machinery spares".
Ha ha, that's exactly the thought process that went through my cynical mind when that was mentioned on the news last night I'm sure that it was just what it said on the tin in reality, machinery for construction. No doubt being more robust it will survive the tipping with only a few scratches that will buff out.

Nah - if there was any doubt about the veracity of the cargo, the CIA would be involved :) :

M.V. Magdeburg | Magdeburg - Thames River disaster | Transport - ships and the docks | Tilbury and Chadwell Memories (http://www.tilburyandchadwellmemories.org.uk/page_id__149.aspx)

Fat Magpie
5th Jan 2015, 16:48
Rumour control is suggesting she was attached to two tugs shortly beforehand and one tug did not detach a line in time as she began a tight turn, the still attatched line caused her to start to keel over.

airship
5th Jan 2015, 16:53
G-CPTN wrote: Quote:
We can confirm that we do have roughly 1200 Jaguar and Land Rover products aboard the stricken ship. Until such time as the salvage operation can safely begin, we can tell you nothing further about the implications for the cargo. However, the most important consideration is that the crew are safe and well.

– Spokesperson for Land Rover UK

Only a corporate (probably official PR) spokes-person who was extremely confident that whatever losses the company had at risk were 500% covered by insurance, could have put forward the notion that their 'premier consideration' was "that the crew are safe and well"...?! :ok:

Or perhaps I'm just overly-dubious about the true intentions of big multi-nationals...?

PS. I do remember once reading about a maritime insurer a long time ago whose advertisement/s went along the lines of a conversation: "We're insuring ships that will sink...". Followed by "That's very good business!"

joy ride
5th Jan 2015, 17:09
Barry Lloyd, thanks for that fascinating and rather shocking article about the Magdeburg, very murky goings-on there!

Mariner9
5th Jan 2015, 17:12
I can remember the French Cross stations issuing Nav. Warnings, the wreck was marked and ships still ploughed into the Tricolor. I think in the end they had to position warships to warn vessels away from her.

They did indeed. However the Vicky hit the wreck despite 4 cardinal buoys and a French warship on station. The Master told me he had to alter course to avoid the warship and hit the wreck as a result. I would love to have blamed the French :E, but sadly other more reliable evidence showed what really happened (which I can't say).

G-CPTN
5th Jan 2015, 17:19
I started some research into the shipping company that runs this vessel, and discovered that they have 50 to 60 of these - and they are by no means the largest operator - there is mention of 127 and 160 such vessels owned by other companies.

I know that the ones that Nissan use do a round trip involving Scandinavia, Russia, Europe, Middle East, India, China and Japan, Australia, South America and the United States of America, so at any time there are hundreds of thousands of vehicles circulating the Globe looking for customers.

Whilst the traffic between Nissan factories is predominantly between Japan and other manufacturing areas, they build vehicles in 20 different countries with several locations in China.

And then there are the other manufacturers and their manufacturing facilities spread over the World.

This vessel was headed for the Middle East, carrying JCBs, Jaguars and Range Rovers as well as BMW Minis.

KelvinD
5th Jan 2015, 17:52
Re Tug rumour; don't believe it. I have spent a few years watching ships depart Southampton, usually from Calshot. Tugs for these vessels never accompany them down Southampton Water. The only vessels to sail with any tugs still attached are the large crude carriers from the Esso terminal. They have a single tug at the stern to provide braking and turning at spots such as the one in the news.
Here's a few dozen examples of departing Hoegh vessels with not a tug in sight:
Ship Photos, Container ships, tankers, cruise ships, bulkers, tugs etc (http://www.kelvindavies.co.uk/kelvin//categories.php?cat_id=72)
Also, Caterpillar export quite a few very heavy machines through Southampton. And when I say heavy, I mean verging on the monstrous!
These ships don't cruise the oceans looking for customers. It is a pretty slick operation. Honda, Nissan and Land Rover export from Southampton on a regular basis. In fact Honda had pretty much an entire berth of their own, such was the volume. Peugeot also used to export from here, as did the Ford Transit until production of that was shifted to Turkey.
And as many as 10,000 cars per month come into Southampton from Flushing (leading to the dockers there calling the UK "Treasure Island"!)

airship
5th Jan 2015, 18:23
Inspired by Fox3WheresMyBanana's post which was very original (at least it's the 1st time I've ever heard of it): p.s. It's Ro-Ro-Ro Roll On/Roll Off/Roll Over

I see that JB is going strong here: everyone is ro-ro-rowing their own boats...?! :ok:

PS. Rolls-Royces and Bentleys being transported together with JCBs, Nissans, Toyotas and Jaguars and Land Rovers? Surely not...?! :yuk:

joy ride
5th Jan 2015, 18:29
Roll on, roll over, Rolls get Bent

ley

G-CPTN
5th Jan 2015, 18:31
One Rolls Royce Wraith but no Bentleys.

Super VC-10
5th Jan 2015, 18:55
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MV_H%C3%B6egh_Osaka

and an earlier one

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MV_Cougar_Ace

sitigeltfel
5th Jan 2015, 19:50
The DM is reporting the cargo includes, one Rolls-Royce Wraith, 65 MINIs and 1,200 Jaguars and Land Rovers.

:{

Super VC-10
5th Jan 2015, 20:29
The Reijin was lost on her maiden voyage, 26-27 April 1988. Photo Jean-Pierre Balzard, GNU Free Documentation Licence. :ok:

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:L%27_%C3%A9pave_du_cargo_transporteur_de_v%C3%A9hicules _-_Reijin_-.jpg

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:L%27_%C3%A9pave_du_cargo_transporteur_de_v%C3%A9hicules _-_Reijin_-.jpg

G-CPTN
5th Jan 2015, 20:59
MV Reijin:- The manufacturers were so scared of people stealing whole cars or parts from the wrecked vessel (which was easy to reach from land) that they ordered the vessel, and it's cargo of brand new vehicles, to be towed out into deep water and sunk.

Super VC-10
5th Jan 2015, 21:55
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MV_Reijin

11Fan
5th Jan 2015, 22:02
That's the way the Mercedes Benz.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
5th Jan 2015, 22:03
I claim no originality. Ro-Ro-Ro was a common joke at the time of the Herald of Free Enterprise fatal accident (1987) in the Channel
Herald of Free Enterprise disaster - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herald_of_Free_Enterprise_disaster)

airship
5th Jan 2015, 22:17
I claim no originality.

I was afraid of that. I'm not sure how I'll ever be able to take you seriously here. Ever again. Even though I can understand how you might have once frequented individuals (of various reputations) at parties surrounded by seemingly-unattached and very young (if not clearly underage) hostesses... :ok:

joy ride
6th Jan 2015, 08:40
The Mary Rose capsised and sank because a refit raised its hull further above the waterline and balance point: too much above the waterline, too little below.

Greed, arrogance and ignorance led a formerly stable ship to be heightened and de-stabilised.

In 1907 The Principessa Yolanda capsized on launch for the same basic reasons: more cabin space than was wise for a ship of her size.

Lessons not learned!

TWT
6th Jan 2015, 09:36
Indeed !

Sinking of the MV Sewol - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinking_of_the_MV_Sewol)

mad_jock
6th Jan 2015, 10:11
From a naval architect mate.

3D Recreation of Höegh Osaka's Intentional Grounding in the Solent - gCaptain Maritime & Offshore News (http://gcaptain.com/3d-dynamic-replay-hoegh-osakas-grounding-solent/)

seafire6b
6th Jan 2015, 12:47
Nice link mad jock, thanks!

VP959
6th Jan 2015, 15:02
Thanks for that link, MJ. What it shows is that there was some very clever seamanship going on when they made the decision to beach her on the Bramble Bank. I was particularly impressed by the way she seemed to be turned and then beached broadside on, perhaps using the thrusters. I'm guessing this was a clever way of making sure she had the best chance of remaining partially upright after beaching.

I take my hat off to the pilot, captain and crew, that really was a very nice bit of seamanship indeed.

G-CPTN
6th Jan 2015, 15:10
I wonder if marine pilots have to practice emergency-avoidance manoeuvres in the sim like real pilots?

mad_jock
6th Jan 2015, 17:37
High Tech Cowboys of the Deep Seas: The Race to Save the Cougar Ace (http://archive.wired.com/science/discoveries/magazine/16-03/ff_seacowboys?currentPage=all)

Another link from my tame rubber duck designer.

mad_jock
6th Jan 2015, 19:18
Oh he says they are going to refloat it tomorrow.

Apparently a digger went through the hull on deck 6 and they have repaired that now.

They are getting the pumps on this evening

Fox3WheresMyBanana
6th Jan 2015, 19:30
Agree with VP; intelligent decision to beach and well handled in the circumstances.

joy ride
6th Jan 2015, 20:39
Thanks Mad Jock!

Methinks the aviation industry needs to learn to keep track like shipping!

I went through Southampton today on a train but no chance of seeing it.

G-CPTN
6th Jan 2015, 23:17
Loose JCB 'dug a hole' in Solent grounded ship - Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/11329343/Loose-JCB-dug-a-hole-in-Solent-grounded-ship.html)

South Shields has a shipping simulator.

http://www.stc.ac.uk/sites/default/files/Maritime%20Prospectus_web.pdf

KIKSeL5czEA

mad_jock
7th Jan 2015, 03:21
Glasgow Nautical college had a simulator 25 years ago when I was there learning how I shouldn't really be welding anything.

Didn't stop me getting Lloyd coded though 5 years later.

The current sim there is quite impressive.

CISTRS
7th Jan 2015, 07:31
Quoting from Global Construction Review:

Over a hundred JCB diggers stranded in UK shipwreck

6 January 2015 | By Rod Sweet Over a hundred JCB diggers stranded in UK shipwreck

Construction in the Middle East may feel a pinch in heavy machinery after a ship carrying 105 pieces of equipment from British manufacturer JCB ran aground off the English coast on 3 January.

The vehicle-laden vessel Hoegh Osaka was run deliberately into a sand bank near the Isle of Wight when it began listing just after leaving Southampton port.
Millions of pounds worth of JCB construction machinery destined for JCB dealers in the Middle East are now stranded.
Salvage workers were finally able to board the vessel on 5 January to assess the state of the ship and its £100m plus cargo.
“We are awaiting further information from the shipping carrier about the current status of the machines and any plans they may have for retrieval,” a JCB spokesman said.
The cargo includes 50-tonne and 33-tonne tracked excavators among a shipment of 105 items of construction plant also made up of backhoe loaders, Loadall telescopic handlers and wheeled loading shovels. Also on board are around 1400 cars.
The new machines were manufactured at factories in Staffordshire, England, and had already been sold, according to some reports.

onetrack
7th Jan 2015, 10:23
The entire cargo will be scrap, for the following reasons;

1. No manufacturer will try to salvage their vehicle or machine from a wreck such as this and try to sell it, because of major potential warranty claims from saltwater-affected components or components damaged in the wrecking and recovery process.

2. Nearly all of the cargo will have broken their hold-downs and have shifted dramatically within the holds. They will be piled up like kids toys in a sandpit at the end of playtime.
The hold-downs would not be capable of restraining the vehicles or machines at the angle they are currently on (which I'd roughly estimate is around 60°).
The hold-downs are only designed to prevent cargo movement in a heavy sea, not restrain the entire weight of the item at 60°.
I have seen pics of cargo (mostly Caterpillar earthmovers) that broke their restraints in a big storm. It wasn't a pretty sight, seeing the results of big earthmovers thrown one against the other.

The whole lot effectively belongs to the marine insurer right now, and they will not be looking at recovery and sale, merely scrapping of the wreckage and cargo as expeditiously as possible.

mad_jock
7th Jan 2015, 10:53
one track they are capable of holding the vehicles even slightly over the top as well.

I have scuba dived on a few wrecks with cars and lorry' still suspended from the deck years after it sank.

But it sounds like they hadn't secured before departure. So it maybe a big heap.

Ancient Mariner
7th Jan 2015, 11:09
Onetrack:Nearly all of the cargo will have broken their hold-downs and have shifted dramatically within the holds. They will be piled up like kids toys in a sandpit at the end of playtime.

Not so sure about that.

Mazda officials reported little to no damage to the vehicles on board despite the ship listing nearly 90 degrees for over a month
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MV_Cougar_Ace

In my experience it is not the list that is the main challenge, but the G-Forces encountered. Not many of those in a slow heeling motion.
Per

Gordon17
7th Jan 2015, 11:24
From the same Wikipedia article -

Mazda officials reported little to no damage to the vehicles on board despite the ship listing nearly 90 degrees for over a month.[9] However, according to the US Coast Guard, 41 vehicles broke loose and shifted, and the few public pictures from inside the ship do show severe damage to at least some cars.

On September 11, 2006, one day before the Cougar Ace arrived in Portland to begin unloading, Mazda USA announced that none of the Mazda cars aboard would be sold as new vehicles. Mazda USA published a list of VINs for the affected Mazda vehicles on the Mazda Cars, Sedans, SUVs & Crossovers | Mazda USA (http://www.MazdaUSA.com) website.

On December 15, 2006, Mazda announced that all vehicles on the Cougar Ace would be scrapped. After an extensive process to deploy all the airbags in each vehicle, all of the Mazda cars were crushed onsite at the Port of Portland by Pacific Car Crushing. The last Mazda car from the shipment was crushed on May 6, 2008.

Mechta
7th Jan 2015, 11:27
Onetrack, As the Hoegh Osaka got to that angle relatively gently, the weight of the vehicles will have come onto the straps progressively. In a high sea, the vehicles will be getting rocked backwards and forwards, potentially slackening them slightly. This would have the effect of the strop getting a shock load each time the ship rolls.

Maybe the Hoegh Osaka crew were planning to strap the vehicles down enroute? When you consider that even Irish sea ferries rely on the car's handbrakes for the full crossing in most conditions, maybe the crew of this ship were counting on the same until they reached less benign sea areas. If the JCB was facing across the ship and had no brake on at all; with the ship being only 1/3 full, it could have got quite a bit of momentum up across the deck before hitting the side of the ship when it (the ship) turned.

A merchant seaman once told me how he watched a whole deck of cars get destroyed in a high sea. One broke loose, and got thrown around into and over the others. Conditions were too dangerous for the crew to do anything about it.

mad_jock
7th Jan 2015, 11:51
Actually come to think of it when I last took a wagon on the St Clair with a full load so we were 40tons.

They used 40t chains and dwangs.

two on the front axel of the unit and one attached to a point just below the 5th wheel in a V two points.

Then two up onto the trailer bed next to the legs which were down with hook so they were a V to two attachment points.

Then another two onto the rear axle. So that was 10 chains all rated at 40 tons each.

CISTRS
7th Jan 2015, 13:59
The fate of the vessel may be a slightly different consideration.

The whole lot effectively belongs to the marine insurer right now, and they will not be looking at recovery and sale, merely scrapping of the wreckage and cargo as expeditiously as possible.

The cargo will be insured, either by the buyer or the seller of the cargo, and will be the subject of a claim settlement.
The cargo will NOT be going to the originally consigned destination.

Ancient Mariner
7th Jan 2015, 14:21
Mechta:Maybe the Hoegh Osaka crew were planning to strap the vehicles down enroute?

Bad seamanship, and would not have happened on any ship I've been on. I also believe that it is the longshoremen, those who load the ship, that will do the strapping on car carriers. Otherwise you'll need a bloody big crew.
Then again you have the Townsend-Thoresen ferries routinely leaving Zeebrugge with their bow visor open, only just closing it before they passed the breakwater. We used to call it an "accident waiting to happen". Unfortunately we were right.
We never dropped a line until we had all green lights on the bridge for the locks on the ramps.
Per

G-CPTN
7th Jan 2015, 15:48
BBC News - Cargo ship: Stricken Solent vessel 'frees itself' (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hampshire-30716023)

Stricken cargo ship Hoegh Osaka is drifting - Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/11330647/Stricken-cargo-ship-Hoegh-Osaka-is-drifting.html)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-30717556

mad_jock
7th Jan 2015, 16:28
Them of the plastic duck design department are getting rumours through that she was late for sea and was about to get over stay penalties.

And they knew the loading was a bit dodgy before they set off.

Mariner9
7th Jan 2015, 16:40
The whole lot effectively belongs to the marine insurer right now, and they will not be looking at recovery and sale, merely scrapping of the wreckage and cargo as expeditiously as possible.

That is not the way marine cargo insurance works.

The Assured have a requirement to act as a "prudent uninsured", and it is up to them to take the appropriate steps to mitigate any losses.

ian16th
7th Jan 2015, 17:13
Question

What is the state of Spring Tides around the Solent?

Here in the southern hemisphere we are right on the high mark.

mad_jock
7th Jan 2015, 17:23
they beached it not far off high tide which is why it came of a bit of surprise when it floated by itself.

I have put to the duck designers that the current must have been scouring the sand away round it and digging it out for them.

Currently the wind at Brambles is report as 22G28 so I imagine it must be a bit of handful to tow.

To be honest I have been stuck on that bank as well.

We got off due to the amount of booze consumed and pissed over the side.

G-CPTN
7th Jan 2015, 17:54
Well, it's full moon here - though, thinking about it, I don't imagine that the brightness of the moon is what attracts the tides.

ORAC
7th Jan 2015, 18:52
Here in the southern hemisphere we are right on the high mark. Well there's only so much water. If it's high one place its low another. A longitude variable I presume rather than hemispherical.

mad_jock
7th Jan 2015, 19:00
tides are due to the moon and how near it is to the earth in combination with the sun

so a bulge in the crust follows where it is over head. And it will be low at 90 degrees to that and high on the opposite side.

when the moon is in line with the sun ie new moon the tidal range is the largest

And when just past a half moon the solar cancels out some of the moon pull and the tide is at is lowest

OFSO
7th Jan 2015, 20:08
Well, it's full moon here

...and I have a vision of wolves in part-human form being chained together and pulling the mighty vessel across the sands.....

west lakes
7th Jan 2015, 20:13
Though on one of thee ship position websites, the vessel is now marked as a wreck still sat on the Bramble Bank, though the tugs are now some miles west going very slowly!

mad_jock
7th Jan 2015, 20:46
They are towing it into portsmouth harbour with over 20knts of wind to make life difficult.

The wx is meant to get much worse later in the week.


Its seems they are a bit stuck what to do with it.

It certainly isn't over yet by a long stretch.

G-CPTN
7th Jan 2015, 21:56
They could always beach it on a sandbank . . .

mad_jock
7th Jan 2015, 22:03
Don't think there is any ones in that bit.

If they get much further in its got the potential to bugger up the navy going out to play.

west lakes
7th Jan 2015, 22:07
They are towing it into Portsmouth harbour with over 20knts of wind to make life difficult.

Looks like all 4 tugs are now heading slowly (1.5kt approx) in the same direction.
I would guess if they are trying for Portsmouth they will try to get it past the dockyard & ferry berths where the navy decommissioned ships often sit

mad_jock
7th Jan 2015, 22:28
Change of plan they are towing it to the east then holding it and reassessing its condition.

They are trying to come up with some ballasting plan and now they can get under it some additional things can be brought into play.

I suspect they just want to get it somewhere they can off load it. Or get more weight on it lower down.

joy ride
8th Jan 2015, 08:31
G-CPTN wrote "They could always beach it on a sandbank..."

They could always beach it at Sandbanks and convert it into luxury flats.

sunday8pm
8th Jan 2015, 10:18
I'm fascinated by this but a little unclear as to what the POA is to put her upright. Surely this would need to happen before unloading any cargo is possible?

mad_jock
8th Jan 2015, 10:57
if you read that link I posted about the high-tech cowboys it gives you an insight into what they do.

Basically is a juggling game of weight distribution.

They can't just loads tons of water in one side because that may flip her right the way over the oppersite way.

They can't just pump all the flooded water out because it might be whats keeping her up right just now.

So they have to work out where the water is, how much it is and make a plan of either removing it or balancing the weight distribution out so that she goes vertical again in a controlled manner.

sunday8pm
8th Jan 2015, 11:05
Thanks,

I'd be interested to know, given I and many on here don't have sea experience, how you feel the bad weather we're likely to experience by way of high winds over the next couple of days is likely to complicate the task.

To your knowledge has the ingress of sea water been brought under control? What kind of depth might the water inside the ship be?

I ask wondering how she manages to balance at this angle given there is potentially a heap of cargo inside (I'm aware other posts on here have stated that to be unlikely).

mad_jock
8th Jan 2015, 11:11
I drive planes,

Its just I know a few rubber duck designers.

But my limited experience scuba diving off boats and sailing I would suspect high winds will be a complete and utter pain in the bum to them.

And they have sealed the hole up apparently. BUt don't know if it was the result or the cause of the incident.

sunday8pm
8th Jan 2015, 11:32
I imagine priority number 1 has to be towing her somewhere stable and controlled. There doesn't seem to be too much concern at this stage regarding her potentially capsizing and letting water in at starboard deck.

G-CPTN
8th Jan 2015, 11:37
For some time after the vessel was beached, there were lights visible throughout - would these have been powered by auxiliary engines?

Can these auxiliaries continue to operate at 50 degree lean?

What about the main propulsion engines? Can they operate at such list?

I'm not suggesting that they would want to drive the vessel using the main engines, but there might be auxiliary services (such as pumps to transfer ballast) that depend on the main power plants.

I suppose the salvage crews would have to use external sources to move the ballast.

Ancient Mariner
8th Jan 2015, 12:26
Several options re power. Emergency generators with auto start and load shedding, emergency batteries.
The aux engines will run as long as they have fuel, air, cooling and lube. Don't know how long they will survive at a sustained 50 degree.
I'm pretty sure the aux engines will provide more than enough power for the ballast pumps.
Per

G-CPTN
8th Jan 2015, 12:40
Vessel Traffic Services for the Port of Southampton said the Hoegh Osaka's generators had now failed, turning off the on-board lighting that had previously illuminated the ship.
From:- BBC News - Cargo ship: Stricken Solent vessel set for checks by divers (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hampshire-30723855)

mad_jock
8th Jan 2015, 12:44
http://youtu.be/YYMp8axvz9o

She didn't half move fast when she re-floated herself.

Bet that caused a bit of swearing

onetrack
8th Jan 2015, 12:45
Caterpillar earthmover engines will operate at over 60° of tilt, and fore and aft angle, in operation. They have dual suction bells (mounted fore and aft) for the oil pump, to allow these angles of operation.
I'm not sure that marine genset engines would be similarly designed, but I would think not. If they are Cat gensets, it's possible they utilise a similar oil pumping setup as the Cat crawler tractors.
At the reported 52° of list, any gensets on board without dual suction bells or other similar design for steep operating angles, would be dangerously close to running out of oil to circulate through the engine.

mad_jock
8th Jan 2015, 20:18
Apparently they have been struggling keeping it in position this afternoon.

BRAMBLEMET - Weather Reports from Bramble Bank (http://www.bramblemet.co.uk/(S(uwbrke23mpdlmg551jhdvsn4))/wind.aspx)

And some of the cargo has started leaking oil, but nothing seen in the sea yet.

Low Flier
9th Jan 2015, 05:50
They have dual suction bells (mounted fore and aft)

I know a girl like that.:E

Low Flier
9th Jan 2015, 05:51
http://s2.postimg.org/qovsbkpy1/list.jpg

sunday8pm
9th Jan 2015, 10:59
I'm not surprised the cargo is leaking with all those engines being held at 60'. Do we have it on authority that the tie downs have held the cars?

mad_jock
9th Jan 2015, 11:18
nope some could be loose.

And the forecast for Sat morning is now causing some bums to twitch.

Last nights 25G45 was causing some sweaty brows and swear words.

They were joined by another dutchie tug and the have a couple more on there way.

KelvinD
9th Jan 2015, 13:25
The local press reported a couple of days ago that the car tie-downs were fine but some of the JCBs had broken free. It was the flying JCBs that made a small hole in the hull.

sunday8pm
9th Jan 2015, 13:55
If the boat was late for sea, was the plan to tie the heavy stuff down en route?

Krystal n chips
10th Jan 2015, 13:18
Fascinating and informed thread on boats / ships..( select term of choice ;) )

This little article, well to be fair, it's not that short, makes interesting reading therefore and there's enough expertise on here to comment if they feel so inclined, as to the factuality of the content.

Worse things still happen at sea: the shipping disasters we never hear about | World news | The Guardian (http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/jan/10/shipping-disasters-we-never-hear-about)

I do actually have a short term vested interest in cargo boats because, if all continues to progress, I will be spending 3 days on an 8000 tonne vessel as a holiday.

I have long wished to see how a ship is operated and to get a closer look at the engine room, and to talk to a marine engineer, for the comparisons between ships and aircraft in both respects. Hence the interest.

mad_jock
10th Jan 2015, 15:16
current update by the rubber duck brethren..

She is still in sort of the same spot..

The QM2 came in and reported 72knt winds in the area and she had only dragged her anchor a 100m or so.

No change to the list during this period.

The salvage boys have pumped upwards of 3000 gallons of water out of her. And thankfully have managed to not pump any leaked oil out while they have done it.

So it seems things are progressing well.

Super VC-10
10th Jan 2015, 16:43
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_shipwrecks_in_2015


Other lists are available, covering all years from 1774 to 2015. WWI and WW2 have lists for individual months.

sunday8pm
11th Jan 2015, 11:53
Am I the only one wondering how the hole in her hull was repaired so quickly? Either from inside the ship or outside underneath sound equally dangerous and problematic.

Mechta
11th Jan 2015, 12:22
Am I the only one wondering how the hole in her hull was repaired so quickly? Either from inside the ship or outside underneath sound equally dangerous and problematic. Provided the holed part wasn't buried in the sandbank, it should have been quite straightforward:

1.Oxyacetylene Oxyhydrogen* to cut away any distorted metal

2. Tack in place new plate

3. Weld all round

Underwater cutting and welding has been going on in the North Sea for years. There are probably other techniques with adhesives, spot welding on threaded studs, or simply drilled through and bolting on with a suitable gasket or sealant.

I would have thought the flow of water in or out of the hole would be one of the main issues to overcome whist trying to install the patch.

This gives some ideas:

UNDERWATER WELDING REPAIRS TO DAMAGED HULL | Irish Sea Contractors (http://www.irishseacontractors.com/underwater-welding-repairs-to-damaged-hull/)

Its possible the hole was above the waterline when it was on the sandbank, although that would seem too good to be true.

There are bound to be some interesting lectures at the various engineering institutions over the next couple of years as a result of this.

mad_jock
11th Jan 2015, 12:34
nah its easy to repair,

cut of the protruding edges externally then side a plate down the side, the water pressure will keep it pinned to the hole. Then weld it.

Depends on the flow rate through the hole how difficult it is.

Cutting will be done with a magnesium lance which cuts through 1" thick plate steel like a knife through butter ( think light sabers in starwars going through doors)

or if they have access inside they might have boxed and concreted it after putting a temp flow stopper over the outside.

The basic methods of plugging holes in boats hasn't changed in hundreds of years. Plug it from the inside if possible or fothering the outside. Or a combination of both.

The salvage divers will have done it numerous times.

421dog
11th Jan 2015, 12:35
Provided the holed part wasn't buried in the sandbank, it should have been quite straightforward:

1. Oxyacetylene cut away any distorted metal

I was under the impression that acetylene didn't do to well under pressure and that oxy-hydrogen or oxy-arc techniques were used for this sort of underwater cutting.

As there seems to be a phenomenal trove of people on this thread who really understand maritime matters, I'm sure there's a commercial diver or two floating around who can straighten me out on this.

Mechta
11th Jan 2015, 12:54
421Dog, you are of course, correct. I should have researched what I was writing more thoroughly! In fact it looks as though arc welding is another possible option, although with some unpleasant side effects for the person doing it:

Hyperbaric welding - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperbaric_welding)

Oxy-fuel welding and cutting - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxy-fuel_welding_and_cutting)

mad_jock
11th Jan 2015, 12:54
I used to hold a part 4 commercial diver which is soft shite stuff.

These guys will be all part 2 and hard as nails to boot.

http://images.machinedesign.com/images/archive/72396thermallan_00000050487.jpg

This is what I was on about, they can cut through concrete.

They might have even used focused plasma explosive cutting which is basically a copper wire at the top of a V with explosives on top of it.

When the explosives fire the copper wire turns into plasma and gets focused as a cutting knife though what ever you have aimed it at. Its very easy to install and use. And its not what you would imagine as a huge bang and water erupting when you fire it. More of a bit of a bang and the H beam you were cutting is in two bits.

Stanwell
11th Jan 2015, 13:40
MJ,
My first thought was a cement-box fix - but it then occurred to me that the JCB that caused the damage would have been still been hard up against the breach.
This salvage is going to be interesting.

mad_jock
11th Jan 2015, 13:55
I will ask the boys.

Thinking about it I would likely get a hull profile cut for a couple of meters past the extremes of the hole then give it 20 cm above the furthest out it goes.

Then weld the open sided box up and put a inlet valve in it with the profile side open.

Install it with the valve open and weld it to the hull. Then inject concrete into the inlet valve until its seen inside and close the valve. Either concrete or that expanding foam sealant that cures rock hard.

Donkey497
11th Jan 2015, 14:38
For patching puncture type holes which are not too large there are now soft silicon rubber patches which have Kevlar embedded in the facings and the body of the patch. These are held in place partly by the water pressure, but mainly by a ring of magnets in the perimeter of the patch.
The Kevlar provides puncture protection and a degree of pressure resistance while the silicon rubber is relatively sticky against most hulls, even cruddy, barnacle encrusted ones.


This lets you patch up any number of small holes without having to resort to putting in a semi permanent cement box. I believe that these were just beginning to be introduced around the time my old man retired as Chief Engineer on deep sea tankers around 25 years ago using nylon and glass fibre, but have moved on to Kevlar in more recent times.


According to "the oracle" for a good seal or for a patch that would be on for a while before a permanent fix could be applied, the thought was to thoroughly cover the back of the patch with silicon sealant on a 1/2 inch bead as a minimum & get the diver to give it a good initial squeeze into position and the water pressure would complete the job as the silicon cured.

mad_jock
11th Jan 2015, 14:40
so the modern version of a fluffy sail stuck over the hole.

It hasn't really changed.

joy ride
11th Jan 2015, 14:45
If I recall Captain Cook's crew had to do a similar repair process when they struck the Great Barrier Reef, using canvas and tar. Kevlar is obviously far better than canvas, but the concept is tried and tested.

G-CPTN
11th Jan 2015, 15:07
On a slightly different but related theme, I know of a young girl (60 years ago) who used treacle and wool to repair her toys.

Similar principle - an adhesive and a matrix.

dazdaz1
11th Jan 2015, 15:22
G-CPTN....."On a slightly different but related theme, I know of a young girl (60 years ago) who used treacle and wool to repair her toys."

There's a joke reply there somewhere :E

Hydromet
11th Jan 2015, 21:10
Joy Ride, you are correct. Interesting that Cook had never done it himself previously, but it speaks to his leadership that 1. a midshipman who had done it previously felt able to suggest it, and 2. Cook readily accepted the suggestion and let the middy manage it (although he was in a fairly dire situation at the time). Good CRM?

joy ride
12th Jan 2015, 10:22
Large sections of the Great Wall of China are built with straw and mud...another example of adhesive and matrix, as are modern composites like fibreglass and carbon fibre. Even the way blood seals a wound is based on a similar process.

Mechta
12th Jan 2015, 17:57
Don't forget wattle and daub (wood lattice plus manure) and in more modern times Pykcrete (sawdust or paper plus ice).

"On a slightly different but related theme, I know of a young girl (60 years ago) who used treacle and wool to repair her toys."That for some reason reminded me of an industrial chemist with whom I was working recently. To quote him, "I've spent my working life trying to find a method of bonding to PTFE (Teflon), yet my wife manages it every time she does the cooking."

mad_jock
12th Jan 2015, 20:17
There is a media briefing tomorrow lunch time.

Apparently the hole was a hole as such but more of a crack which has a temp repair done on it.

they don't know how it was fixed. They suspect its wasn't welded though because it was pretty hairy out there when the fix was done.

mad_jock
13th Jan 2015, 13:30
Apparently one of the tugs had collided with it during the bad wx but is now back in action.

They are now pumping water back into it to try and lower its COG they didn't say if this was into the ballast tanks or into the car decks.

Apparently if the hole hadn't been made and the water got in it would have capsized

After they get things sorted out they are taking it back to Southampton.

They are concerned that the cars don't move, if they do it will capsize and there is not a lot they can do about it with the current wx or forecast wx until its passed.

mad_jock
16th Jan 2015, 09:59
they are putting people onboard today using helicopters.

Setting up pumps and possibly doing some ballasting.

Tomorrow the wind is due to drop and they can start doing a bit more.

Plan is still to take her up to Sou. But they haven't decided what to do when she gets there.

G-CPTN
18th Jan 2015, 15:09
About 3,000 tonnes of excess water remains on the vessel and some of its cargo is submerged.

Whether this was water that was pumped-in to stabilize the vessel remains to be revealed.

joy ride
18th Jan 2015, 16:25
Weather looks set for a calm spell so hopefully they will not be interrupted.

When I was young and growing up near Montevideo I regularly used to try to swim out to the wreck of the Graf Spee, the subtleties of perspective and size had not yet been understood! Nearer home and nearer the shore was the wreck of a scuttled cargo ship which I also failed to reach. My earliest memory, at 2 years old, was sailing to Montevideo on the SS Highland Brigade.

mad_jock
19th Jan 2015, 14:22
list is now 47 degrees.

And they have finished pumping externally

They will now start pumping the internal contaminated water into empty fuel tanks which they expect to get her upright.

They need to ballast her quite extensively and also it means they don't pump contaminated water into the sea.

Plan is to move it wed night or early Thursday morning. Still no news where they are going to berth it. They want to get it into its normal loading bit but they don't know what draft its going to be after the ballasting.

Some think that the Captain is going to be in hot water over this one.

Stanwell
19th Jan 2015, 14:35
MJ,
I had heard around the traps that Captain MacKenzie would not have left berth without being satisfied that the ship was ready for sea.
The thick plottens..

mad_jock
19th Jan 2015, 15:20
They were just about to hit a significant overstay penalty.

We will have to wait for the final report. Same as aviation its going to be a mixture of human factors and technical factors.

And its always the good ones that seem to screw up the worst.

But just looking at the thing in the water it just doesn't look right to my uneducated eye of ship design.

G-CPTN
19th Jan 2015, 17:34
Thanks for keeping us informed.

Fingers crossed that the salvage experts can come up with a combination of ballast distribution that will 'right' the vessel sufficiently to allow it to be 'docked' and the vehicle load removed.

Testicle work ahead.

Undoubtedly some vehicles on the lowest deck(s) will be 'scrap' (having been submerged), but those on the upper decks should be OK (apart from 'reputation').

mad_jock
19th Jan 2015, 17:51
Whats the numbering system for decks on a boat?

Ie is deck 1 the bottom or the top?

As it seems to me they had all the plant loaded on deck 6

I always thought it was bottom up but could be wrong.

Gordon17
19th Jan 2015, 20:45
The biggest stuff will usually go on the deck that the loading ramps lead on to as it can't go up or down the ramps between the decks. Also this will be a fixed deck and able to take the heaviest items of cargo. Some of the other decks will be hoistable to allow cargo of varying heights.

chksix
19th Jan 2015, 20:58
Counting from the bottom and up.

G-CPTN
19th Jan 2015, 21:37
I would think that most vessels would have decks below the waterline, and that, for vehicle carriers, there would be, just as for passenger vessels, access above the waterline - possibly a couple of decks above the waterline.

Many will also have decks above the access deck.

As suggested, it would make some sense for awkward/bulky/heavy loads to be confined to the access deck.

mad_jock
19th Jan 2015, 22:21
I have always been on roro's which you entered via a lifting front for big stuff and the entry deck was pretty well the water line given a couple of meters or so.

I have been on ferries with a secondary ramp round the side for car access to upper decks.

Again to my engineering head it seems a bit daft to have the heavy stuff high up, its just asking for stability problems.

Maybe with a full load of cars in the lower deck everything is fine. BUt with half loads issues arise.

I am sure this loading is all computerised both pre loading plan then actual loading afterwards is input to double check.

ian16th
20th Jan 2015, 08:28
Again to my engineering head it seems a bit daft to have the heavy stuff high up, its just asking for stability problems.

Gotta agree 100%, but just how heavy is the ships engine and associated kit? This all tends to be installed low down.

mad_jock
20th Jan 2015, 12:01
Reasonably heavy but in centre of gravity calculations compared to the rest of it I have a sneaky feeling its not that much.

OFSO
20th Jan 2015, 12:24
And I've been in side-loading ro-ro's between Ancona and Patrai where you drove three decks down. Well below the waterline......

mad_jock
20th Jan 2015, 15:56
http://www.islandecho.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/I14_7112.jpg

Looking at that it doesn't look as if the bottom access level for the ramp is deck 6

GrumpyOldFart
20th Jan 2015, 16:24
They should take it to fFrance and beach it off Normandy ready for the next time Fritz kicks off. As a so-called ship, it bears an uncanny resemblance to one of those Mulberry things.

joy ride
20th Jan 2015, 16:43
^ Ha! Or smooth the top down with an angle-grinder and sell it to Boris to use as his new airport.

Ancient Mariner
20th Jan 2015, 16:48
Mad Jock:Looking at that it doesn't look as if the bottom access level for the ramp is deck 6
Her draught is 10.15 meters, add maybe 3 from the water line to the ramp. She's carrying cars, how many meters needed per deck? They weigh nothing so you pack them as tight as possible. Not saying that it is deck 6, but then again I am not familiar with the vessel.

As for stability, it is not always what it looks like. One of my ro-ro ships had an enormous tall superstructure. Her problem? Too stable.
Another was the opposite, both as architecture and stability was concerned.
Any Chief mate worth his grog would have calculated the stability of the vessel before she left port. It is not exactly rocket science, even trained deck-monkeys can do it.
I would not overestimate the weight of the construction machinery either, lots of air there too.
Per

onetrack
21st Jan 2015, 05:07
The weight of each piece of construction machinery is known fairly precisely, because it forms part of the machines specifications.
There are sizeable (and expensive) books produced that contain precise dimension and weight specifications of nearly every machine made, as an aid to those involved in the transportation of construction machinery.

Ancient Mariner
21st Jan 2015, 06:27
The Chief Mate is not going to read those books, he will be given a weight by the forwarder.
Per

mad_jock
21st Jan 2015, 10:26
Was about to say when ever I have dumped an artic trailer at the docks the first thing that happens is it goes on a weigh bridge usually before you can even book it in.

Gordon17
21st Jan 2015, 11:50
15 years ago when I worked for a major roro line our booking system contained the weights and dimensions of each item of equipment that our customers produced. This then fed into the cargo-planning system.

Weights and dimensions of any used, or non-standard, plant would have to be entered into the system.

mad_jock
21st Jan 2015, 14:42
Well they have it up to 25 degrees list now and expect to get 15 before this evening.

Once its at 15 then accident investigators are going on and also crew to get lights and other systems working.

Might get moved tonight depends what they find and what state its in.

joy ride
21st Jan 2015, 15:17
Thanks for the progress report, it cannot be a pleasant job in this damp wintry weather.

mad_jock
21st Jan 2015, 15:38
I suspect the amount of money the divers will be making on it they could be swimming in shit for a week and they would love it.

I might add I am nothing to do with it. Just ex uni mates who are naval architects who are keeping me updated and also a pro sailing skipper with a sideline as a yachting Jorno who goes to all the press conferences.

G-CPTN
21st Jan 2015, 16:24
The divers (and others on the salvage crew) will have had 'waiting days' due to the inclement weather conditions.

I wonder what sort of contracts they have regarding getting paid.

I believe that some salvage contractors work on a 'no win no fee' basis, but if you are a diver or other type of operator, I don't suppose that you would be too pleased to have to work for nothing if the job went TU.

mad_jock
21st Jan 2015, 18:58
The jobs I used to do many years ago were for the job or for a set time period.

And recovery of items usually had a success bounty.

I suspect those guys will be on a retainer and profit share.

The profit will of course be substantially higher if successful, I suspect they (the salvage company) will get a bonus as well if there is no pollution.

onetrack
22nd Jan 2015, 08:52
"Hey, anyone want to buy a slightly shop-soiled new Roller or Mini?? I've got a few lovely motors to choose from, they've just got a few water marks on them, they'll be just fine, right after we've hosed them out .. I mean, buffed the water marks off. Just give me a call, the names Arfur ... Arfur Daley ..... " :suspect: "Oh, I forgot .. there's some nice, slightly soiled, JCB diggers available too, real cheap they are, Guv ....... "

mad_jock
22nd Jan 2015, 12:17
Well they have power onboard now.

The car decks are now empty of water.

The list has been reduced to 25 degrees and the investigators are due on board.

They are going to try and get that down to 10-15deg using the ships onboard ballast system.

They haven't decided when it going to move yet, but when it does it should take about 4 hours and they are setting up a NM either side of it and 2000ft fore and aft exclusion zone.

G-CPTN
22nd Jan 2015, 12:44
a NM either side of it
I guess wake wash could capsize it if it isn't stable.

BBC News - Stricken Solent ship: Hoegh Osaka move planned (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hampshire-30933237)

mad_jock
22nd Jan 2015, 12:52
I think it more to do with give the tugs room to move, its not that wide the big ship channel and there is 4 of them needing access both sides.

joy ride
22nd Jan 2015, 12:54
Wishing them "Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage"!

(Or Meerestille und Geluchlig Fahrt as Mendelssohn would say)

GrumpyOldFart
22nd Jan 2015, 13:01
The sole comment from that BBC item:

beverley3103 says...

If it had not been for the pilot doing what he done the tanker would of sank he saved there lifes and should be happy they still have a life to live some people are not that lucky to have there live so they should be happy they are still here to live there lifes with there wives partners and children


English as she is spoke.

:sad:

mad_jock
22nd Jan 2015, 13:02
Aye and loads of pictures of the inside as well please.

Ancient Mariner
22nd Jan 2015, 13:03
And here's little old me thinking my English hoovers.
Per

mad_jock
22nd Jan 2015, 13:32
She has more than likely logged more berth time on ships than you as well Sir.

More than likely all of it in port.

Ancient Mariner
22nd Jan 2015, 14:57
Beverley3103, nah, doesn't ring a bell. Then again........
Per

G-CPTN
22nd Jan 2015, 15:10
From the Beeb:-It left at 14:30 GMT 22nd January, earlier than planned, and is being towed up Southampton Water to Berth 101 at Southampton Docks.
The operation is expected to take three to four hours. The ship was run aground on Bramble Bank on 3 January.

mad_jock
22nd Jan 2015, 15:25
just passed cowes.

http://www.marinetraffic.com/ais/home


vortex rear tug

Thorax front tug.

G-CPTN
22nd Jan 2015, 15:28
One news website (http://onthewight.com/2015/01/22/hoegh-osaka-move-afternoon/) has reported the degree of list as 5 degrees.

mad_jock
22nd Jan 2015, 16:05
They are fairly shifting, not long until its tied up.

Wonder if they will let the media into it.

G-CPTN
22nd Jan 2015, 16:11
Wonder if they will let the media into it.
Nah - they'd just run to one side and capsize it.

mad_jock
22nd Jan 2015, 16:31
or go into the cabin Beverly set up shop in.

pulse1
22nd Jan 2015, 16:51
I am talking to my son on the phone and he said the ship is just passing his window at Netley going up Southampton Water towards the port.

How's that for hot off the press? 16:50 hrs

mad_jock
22nd Jan 2015, 17:15
nearly there.

Anyone found a webcam of the docks?

mad_jock
22nd Jan 2015, 17:41
And that's her getting tied up.


Well done to all involved.

G-CPTN
22nd Jan 2015, 17:46
Thanks for the updates.

How much adjustment will there be in the ramp?

It'll remain to be seen whether the vehicle manufacturers remove all their vehicles from the vessel.

Many customers will be unwilling to accept 'suspect' vehicles.

AeroSpark
22nd Jan 2015, 17:56
Berth 101? Thats the cruise terminal, can't see P+O or Royal Carribean being too pleased!:*

G-CPTN
22nd Jan 2015, 18:03
Would it make any sense to put the vessel into dry dock?

Presumably (?) it would sit 'upright' on the bottom of the dock?

Would there be exceptional stresses on the hull?

AeroSpark
22nd Jan 2015, 18:06
Would it make any sense to put the vessel into dry dock?

Southampton doesn't have one any more. Not sure where the nearest one is but I'm guessing its too far to safely tow it there.

mad_jock
22nd Jan 2015, 18:08
No planned movements in or out of 101 until 27th at least.

Would have thought it would need to be off loaded first before dry dock.

G-CPTN
22nd Jan 2015, 18:20
How far is berth 101 from the vehicle shipping terminal?

All of these vehicles will be unregistered, so will need trade licence plates (or, in some cases, transporters) to 'move'.

I suppose they could move the vessel once they have fettled the list.

G-CPTN
22nd Jan 2015, 18:21
How far is berth 101 from the vehicle shipping terminal?

All of these vehicles will be unregistered, so will need trade licence plates (or, in some cases, transporters) to 'move'.

I suppose they could move the vessel once they have fettled the list.

What about the main engines? Did they shut down before any damage was sustained?

Ancient Mariner
22nd Jan 2015, 18:29
G-CPTN:Would it make any sense to put the vessel into dry dock?
Presumably (?) it would sit 'upright' on the bottom of the dock?
Would there be exceptional stresses on the hull?

It would only make sense if she has a hole below the waterline.
She will sit upright, as she is flat bottomed, but tailored supports will have to be in place first to avoid stress on the hull and to ensure access.
Per

mad_jock
22nd Jan 2015, 18:41
Wonder how they are going to get them out.

There is 1400 of them, which if they have to drag them out comes under a right ballache of a job in my book.

G-CPTN
22nd Jan 2015, 18:52
The vehicle terminal is located at the Eastern Docks, whereas the vessel is berthed at the Western Docks:-
https://www.google.co.uk/maps/dir/ABP,+ABP+City+Cruise+Terminal,+Solent+Road,+Western+Docks,+S outhampton,+Hampshire+SO15+1BS,+United+Kingdom/Eastern+Docks,+Southampton+SO14+3QN,+UK/@50.8957718,-1.4009673,184m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m13!4m12!1m5!1m1!1s0x48747696a870d37f:0xb9f9c 57bf72de6ad!2m2!1d-1.426381!2d50.904722!1m5!1m1!1s0x487476cb65ac401b:0xeb48e5ca 2ad29b10!2m2!1d-1.3990637!2d50.8950262

Although there is less than three miles between the docks, the route involves public highway.

I can imagine that parking space at the vehicle terminal will be at a premium as further batches of vehicles will be occupying the spaces.

JCBs:- https://www.google.co.uk/maps/dir/ABP,+ABP+City+Cruise+Terminal,+Solent+Road,+Western+Docks,+S outhampton,+Hampshire+SO15+1BS,+United+Kingdom/Eastern+Docks,+Southampton+SO14+3QN,+UK/@50.8935978,-1.3979543,184m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m13!4m12!1m5!1m1!1s0x48747696a870d37f:0xb9f9c 57bf72de6ad!2m2!1d-1.426381!2d50.904722!1m5!1m1!1s0x487476cb65ac401b:0xeb48e5ca 2ad29b10!2m2!1d-1.3990637!2d50.8950262

Earthmovers:- https://www.google.co.uk/maps/dir/ABP,+ABP+City+Cruise+Terminal,+Solent+Road,+Western+Docks,+S outhampton,+Hampshire+SO15+1BS,+United+Kingdom/Eastern+Docks,+Southampton+SO14+3QN,+UK/@50.8917727,-1.397382,184m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m13!4m12!1m5!1m1!1s0x48747696a870d37f:0xb9f9c 57bf72de6ad!2m2!1d-1.426381!2d50.904722!1m5!1m1!1s0x487476cb65ac401b:0xeb48e5ca 2ad29b10!2m2!1d-1.3990637!2d50.8950262

More earthmovers:- https://www.google.co.uk/maps/dir/ABP,+ABP+City+Cruise+Terminal,+Solent+Road,+Western+Docks,+S outhampton,+Hampshire+SO15+1BS,+United+Kingdom/Eastern+Docks,+Southampton+SO14+3QN,+UK/@50.889464,-1.3989041,93m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m13!4m12!1m5!1m1!1s0x48747696a870d37f:0xb9f9c 57bf72de6ad!2m2!1d-1.426381!2d50.904722!1m5!1m1!1s0x487476cb65ac401b:0xeb48e5ca 2ad29b10!2m2!1d-1.3990637!2d50.8950262

Even more:- https://www.google.co.uk/maps/dir/ABP,+ABP+City+Cruise+Terminal,+Solent+Road,+Western+Docks,+S outhampton,+Hampshire+SO15+1BS,+United+Kingdom/Eastern+Docks,+Southampton+SO14+3QN,+UK/@50.8850156,-1.3941081,186m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m13!4m12!1m5!1m1!1s0x48747696a870d37f:0xb9f9c 57bf72de6ad!2m2!1d-1.426381!2d50.904722!1m5!1m1!1s0x487476cb65ac401b:0xeb48e5ca 2ad29b10!2m2!1d-1.3990637!2d50.8950262

mad_jock
22nd Jan 2015, 19:02
They won't be staying at the docks.

They will be off to some disused airfield to get processed then decided what to do with them.

I suspect they might even get loaded straight into transporters and not even parked up.

AeroSpark
22nd Jan 2015, 22:18
There is also a fair bit of vehicle storage area in the western docks. Ro-Ro's quite often berth up there when the Eastern docks are full. There is vehicles storage area alongside 102-104 berth, and also further up near the container terminal. If the cars are driveable they can get to the storage area without leaving the docks.

G-CPTN
23rd Jan 2015, 12:55
BBC News - Stricken Solent ship: Hoegh Osaka docks in Southampton (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hampshire-30933237)

Caboclo
23rd Jan 2015, 22:43
They corrected the list, therefore it's old news, surely? It can easily be towed wherever necessary, as soon as all the various parties agree on who has to pay. End of story.

G-CPTN
23rd Jan 2015, 22:51
Hoegh Osaka: stricken ship is opened up after docking - Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/11365969/Hoegh-Osaka-stricken-ship-is-opened-up-after-docking.html)

broadreach
23rd Jan 2015, 23:58
Far from "end of story" Caboclo although I'm sure you posted that comment tongue-in-cheek. As far as I know this is the first time a large vehicle carrier has been recovered quickly after such a mishap, and I suspect that when the full story is known it will go down in the annals of ro-ro operations as a helluva big save. It'll certainly be an interesting one and I do hope Svitzer make a packet on the salvage job, no matter what sort of Lloyds contract they were on.

Thanks Mad Jock for keeping us in the loop throughout! Perhaps you, Ancient Mariner and others can cast a light on why it is that so many of us maritime types turn to an aviation site for intelligent updates and opinion on our own field.

Caboclo
24th Jan 2015, 01:01
Not exactly the first time; Jock posted this back on page 4; it's dated 2008.

http://http://archive.wired.com/science/discoveries/magazine/16-03/ff_seacowboys?currentPage=all

Not really tongue in cheek either; what is left of interest?

mad_jock
24th Jan 2015, 09:41
I was just lucky I had shall we say a connected group of mates who have a clue who were far enough away from it (they deal with rigs) that they were willing to air their views.

That had a couple of people in Hamble that have their ear to the ground.

My interest now is more than likely similar to aviation, going to have to wait until the report is out.

Might get some more info on the state of the cargo with any luck.

onetrack
24th Jan 2015, 10:13
If a 56 tonne Powerscreen Trakpactor 500 broke free and punched a hole in the side of the ship, that tells me one of three things.

1. The cargo securing equipment (chains or other tiedowns) was totally inadequate ..

2. The securing was incorrectly done, or done in a lazy fashion ..

3. The tie-down points on the Powerscreen gave way, thus indicating poor or inadequate design of the tie-down points ..

mad_jock
24th Jan 2015, 10:41
Well if that pic is anything to go by it was strapped down with 75mm strap to a single point V more than likely looped across a sharp edge.

Which in lorry driving terms is tits on a bull and a 2k fine if you get caught even without having an accident.

The only thing that would stop that moving is chains and dwangs.

I presume there are regulations on what to use for tie downs. I know I have done load case studies for stuff going onto supply boats and how its secured to its transport bed.

But all we did was a check for the tie down points and the max load case plus safety factor.

broadreach
25th Jan 2015, 01:17
Caboclo you're right. Cougar Ace was righted in around a month; my slippery memory had it that it took a lot longer.

What's "left of interest" is the same as with any other major accident, ie how it came about, what the similarities were with previous events like Cougar Ace and Reijin (ballasting, securing etc) and how similar accidents can be avoided in future.

421dog
25th Jan 2015, 01:59
This is the best-informed thread on PPRuNE in the past year...

Caboclo
25th Jan 2015, 05:45
I guess I have a limited attention span; it's not going to sink, so I'm bored. :O

As far as learning the cause of the accident, yes, I'm sure 'lessons will be learnt'. Even with all our modern gizmos, we still have planes running into each other on the ground, at 5 kts, whilst operated by first world airlines. Someone told me recently that maritime safety is quite a bit less stringent than aviation, for the simple reason that ships are cheaper than planes. Anyone with knowledge of both industries confirm or deny?

hiflymk3
25th Jan 2015, 09:17
Michael ro ro the boat ashore.

mad_jock
26th Jan 2015, 09:37
Looks like all the surveys are complete.

The boat is now under the control of the owners. The owners of the cargo have done thier thing.

So they will start off loading it today or tomorrow.

No news if they are weighing each item as it comes off.

The rubber duck boys have a theory to do with empty or full hydralic tanks on the plant and standard weights for the equipment. Can't see it myself but there we go.

I can't see them weighing everything.

How much difference would a 50ton bit of plant make if it was parked to port instead of starboard?

Ancient Mariner
26th Jan 2015, 09:56
Broadreach:
Perhaps you, Ancient Mariner and others can cast a light on why it is that so many of us maritime types turn to an aviation site for intelligent updates and opinion on our own field.

I suppose that maritime types have a built in interest for anything that whirrs, bangs, ticks, clatters, wheezes or makes any other type of noise when moving. We also tends to have travelled a bit, and these days that means by air.
On an aviation site us mariners can also establish ourselves as "experts", while the remaining population are.................. experts in other fields.
On a pure maritime site I would personally have been, having been away from the business for 30 years, totally out of my depth.
Here I can shine. :E
Per

Stanwell
26th Jan 2015, 10:55
AM,
Don't put yourself down, mate. You do pretty well.
You might like to check a site called 'Ships Nostalgia'.
There's a few of us older farts contribute there in a friendly manner - except when politics or some-such raises its ugly head.
In fact there's one on there (and here) who started off as a mariner and finished up flying airliners.

Ancient Mariner
26th Jan 2015, 11:12
Stanwell, found "Ships Nostalgia" a few years back while looking for one of my old ships. I think I even registered, but there are only so many hours.
Thanks for the tip.
Fear of Flying led me to now defunct AirDisaster, which pointed me in the direction of Pprune. And here I am. Always been fascinated by airyplanes.
Per

mad_jock
26th Jan 2015, 16:08
And alot of us are the same way about ships

G-CPTN
26th Jan 2015, 16:18
there's one on there (and here) who started off as a mariner and finished up flying airliners.
On one hovercraft trip across the channel I jokingly asked the 'stewardess' if we could go out on deck.
"I'll ask" she said.
A few minutes later she returned and said "Follow me" - and I was lead through the vehicle deck to a ladder (like the Vulcan cockpit) and was shown to the 'control' deck.
Conversations with the 'pilot' who explained that he was neither fish nor fowl but had to have knowledge of both, and an excellent view free from the spray that surrounded the passenger cabin.
I suppose if you don't ask you don't get, but I was being facetious when I asked to go 'out on deck'.

Fareastdriver
26th Jan 2015, 16:35
You could go out on deck on the Hong Kong/Shekou hovercraft. There was a small rear deck where one embarked and disembarked. You were not allowed to smoke in the saloon so you wandered down the back, tipped the waiting crewmember HK$10 and you were let out at the back amidst the pandenmodium to have a fag.

Captain Dart
27th Jan 2015, 04:43
...and some of us flew aeroplanes on and off ships! I like your work, Per!

SpringHeeledJack
27th Jan 2015, 18:00
A few bent and dented vehicles starting to come off the ship…

Hundreds of luxury Land Rovers finally back on dry land after traumatic journey on capsized transporter - and some of them haven't survived the trip so well | Daily Mail Online (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2928552/Hundreds-luxury-Land-Rovers-finally-dry-land-traumatic-journey-capsized-transporter-haven-t-survived-trip-well.html)



SHJ

G-CPTN
27th Jan 2015, 18:01
BBC News - Hoegh Osaka: Land Rovers and Jaguars driven off cargo ship (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hampshire-31002897)

Ancient Mariner
27th Jan 2015, 18:08
Captain Dart: ...and some of us flew aeroplanes on and off ships!
That's one thing I'd like to do, but which will never happen. :(
Per

broadreach
28th Jan 2015, 00:15
I think Ancient Mariner Per hit it on the head about why we're so interested. He might have added that we've had time, whether standing a lonely watch or sitting on a bollard waiting for the tugs, to think things over thoroughly and come, in all modesty, to ALL the right answers. :} Well, most, some at least.

I frequent Ships Nostalgia as well but find it less embracing of "expert views" from many different disciplines and nationalities (construe that as you will) than Pprune.

So shine on AM!

An afterthought: Mazda had all their Cougar Ace cars crushed. No doubt some of those from the Hoegh ship will go that way as well. As for the others, could there be any extra value to be extracted from their having been on board? "Oh yes, I paid 50% over the sticker price because....".

ruddman
28th Jan 2015, 00:41
Yeah this thread on the floating, then bogged, then unbogged, unattractive sea thingy was interesting.

But one question still remains. Yep, it's that time again folks. We all know what it is. So let's sing it in chorus everyone.





"HOW FAST DOES IT GO?????!!!!!"



:ok:

Ancient Mariner
28th Jan 2015, 06:39
Max speed 19.2 kts, or so the owner claims. ;)
Per

ruddman
28th Jan 2015, 07:34
Not bad for a ugly heap of steal. :ok:
Wonder if it has to slow down for the curves..

Ancient Mariner
28th Jan 2015, 07:47
Might be a good idea to slow down a bit.
On Christmas Eve 1980-something on our way up river to Warri, Nigeria the pilot ordered hard starboard while at 16-17 knots.
Result? One very pissed off chief cook, and one very late dinner.
Per

Ancient Mariner
28th Jan 2015, 08:05
This be the ship mentioned above, the Ro-Ro "Norwegian Challenger" after an interesting trip across the North Sea. Forward are the remains of the trailers that did not go over the side, strewn around are hold down chains and trailer supports.
The main deck below looked even worse, with a leaking tank of molasses, broken glass panes and a broken tank of flour. We had to go to Rotterdam just to steam clean the deck before we headed for Africa, otherwise we would have attracted every fly on that continent.
Not the worst trip we had, but I will have to dig deep to find the pictures from the more challenging episodes.
Per

http://i1339.photobucket.com/albums/o702/perebs/003_zpsq1w9qv0k.jpg (http://s1339.photobucket.com/user/perebs/media/003_zpsq1w9qv0k.jpg.html)

ruddman
28th Jan 2015, 08:33
Carnage.
Ship happens eh?

mad_jock
4th Feb 2015, 18:09
They have started offloading armoured personnel carriers off it now.

onetrack
18th Feb 2015, 08:03
So ... what has happened to all the LR's and Jags saved from a watery grave?
Are they being offered at a discount? - just quietly slipped back on the next ship? - or are they being dismantled for parts??
I'll wager there's a major amount of "will we-won't we?", decision-tossing, going on inside the company management upper levels. :ooh:

Stanwell
18th Feb 2015, 09:18
Yes, I'll bet there is.
As you're no doubt aware, Jaguar Land Rover is now owned by the Indian TATA Group.
Ever heard that saying.. "He'd skin a flea for its hide and tallow?" :E

On the other hand, I'm sure the cargo would now be owned by the insurers.
JLR have a reputation to protect and so they're going to be pretty careful about dissemination of info re the fate of those vehicles. :oh:

airship
24th Mar 2015, 01:31
The M/V Hoegh Osaka which ran aground in the Solent back in January is apparently back in normal service (see here (http://www.marinetraffic.com/en/ais/details/ships/shipid:2672751/mmsi:563248000/vessel:HOEGH%20OSAKA)). Quite impressive, all things considered...?!

Just in case anyone's interested, there's a 45 minute-long documentary by Discovery Channel series "MIGHTY SHIPS" about a large ro/ro vehicle carrier the M/V FAUST and her voyage from Southampton to Newark, covering many facets including loading of the cargo on YouTube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qeLN-Ei8RNE

The Wallenius-Wilhelmsen M/V Faust's (uneventful ;)) voyage from Southampton to Newark demonstrates most of the issues involved very well IMHO:

- having enough "qualified drivers" available to drive the vehicles aboard; presumably, if/when an insufficient number are available due to the pre-planned loading "running late" for any reasons, overtime or other incentives come into play rapidly...; also, the drivers all have to be "driven back" to collect new cars to drive aboard again obviously.

- lots of different vehicles involved; Rolls-Royces, BMWs, Minis, Range Rovers, Jaguars, Caterpillar heavy equipment etc. loaded on this trip; from what I understood, Rolls-Royces get special treatment, with 100cm space between cars when stored and 3 x front and 3 x rear attachments to the deck; other cars (even the BMWs etc.) are stored with less than 20cm between cars by the looks of it; but I didn't see any footage of crews securing all the cars to the deck as they were loaded.

- despite all the time-constraints (in this case mainly tidal), the M/V FAUST did get away more or less on schedule apparently; there was a point where a decision had to be made whether or not some vehicles would have to be left behind though.

Once you've watched the documentary, understood the operational and especially commercially-oriented facets of such ships, it might be easier to understand how or why a ro/ro vehicle carrier might find itself running aground somewhere. It's a wonder it doesn't happen more often than it does...?! :)

PS. I've taken a bit of time, research and effort before posting this. Apparently that's a bit unusual here in JB these days...

superq7
16th May 2015, 00:49
Only one in 20 of the vehicles on a cargo ship that was deliberately run aground to avoid sinking in the Solent in January have been written off, The Times has learnt.

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/news/uk/article4442003.ece

Super VC-10
16th Mar 2016, 13:40
The MAIB report into the incident will be released tomorrow.

G-CPTN
17th Mar 2016, 02:15
Hoegh Osaka ship was 'unstable' when it left Southampton port (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hampshire-35823182).

Super VC-10
17th Mar 2016, 16:43
The report

https://assets.digital.cabinet-office.gov.uk/media/56e9a7afe5274a14d9000000/MAIBInvReport6_2016.pdf

M.Mouse
18th Mar 2016, 01:24
Quoted in the BBC link and taken from the report "Unsafe practices had become the norm."

A very good article can be found here. (http://www.fastjetperformance.com/podcasts/how-i-almost-destroyed-a-50-million-war-plane-when-display-flying-goes-wrong-and-the-normalisation-of-deviance) explaining this very phenomenon.

M.Mouse
18th Mar 2016, 01:25
Quoted in the BBC link and taken from the report "Unsafe practices had become the norm."

A very good article can be found here. (http://www.fastjetperformance.com/podcasts/how-i-almost-destroyed-a-50-million-war-plane-when-display-flying-goes-wrong-and-the-normalisation-of-deviance) illustrating this very phenomenon also known as the 'Normalisation of Deviance'.