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TOWTEAMBASE
1st Jan 2015, 10:47
How long prior to NYE is the eye closed from to fit all of those fireworks,and do they then have to carry out a structural survey before it's open again. I'd say at least to make sure there isn't any unexploded fireworks left behind.

Happy new year

Capetonian
1st Jan 2015, 11:07
No idea, but I watched the display on the idiot box and thought it was outstanding.

Unfortunately the Scrooge in me can't help thinking that the money could be better deployed on other things, but my New Year's Resolution is to be less curmudgeonly, so I won't go any further.

TOWTEAMBASE
1st Jan 2015, 11:09
I did think the same thing but thought I'd get shot down by saying it :)

Takan Inchovit
1st Jan 2015, 11:14
Maybe next year they can aim the fireworks on the Eye so the wheel will spin up like one of those firewheel crackers. I'd like to see that! :}

TOWTEAMBASE
1st Jan 2015, 11:16
The London "Catherine wheel" :-D that would be a sight

spekesoftly
1st Jan 2015, 11:35
Closes at 3pm on NYE, and opens at 10am on NYD.

More info:-

Rigging the London Eye for New Year's Eve Fireworks 2015Titanium Fireworks (http://www.titaniumfireworks.com/rigging-london-eye-new-years-eve-fireworks-2015/)

cattletruck
1st Jan 2015, 11:56
I never "got" the London Eye, never understood why people want to stand for an hour in a queue when there is a perfectly good museum a stone's throw away.

I guess it's really just a platform for NY fireworks.

TOWTEAMBASE
1st Jan 2015, 11:59
3pm......that doesn't give them long to get all those pyrotechnics in place. Good work geezers and gals :)

CISTRS
1st Jan 2015, 14:09
I always understood that it was a temporary structure, to be dismantled after the Millennium celebrations.
I intensely regret it being retained indefinitely.

wings folded
1st Jan 2015, 15:36
I always understood that it was a temporary structure, to be dismantled after the Millennium celebrations.Different celebration, but so was the intent for the Eiffel Tower. They now seem glad to have kept it.

M.Mouse
1st Jan 2015, 17:15
I always understood that it was a temporary structure, to be dismantled after the Millennium celebrations.
I intensely regret it being retained indefinitely.

For anybody who doesn't fly it offers great views of London and is a fun experience. Its popularity is obvious.

I wonder if you express the same sentiments about the Eiffel Tower?

M.Mouse
1st Jan 2015, 17:20
Maybe next year they can aim the fireworks on the Eye so the wheel will spin up like one of those firewheel crackers. I'd like to see that!

They have already tried that, here is the experiment:

https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=10154916935000262

uffington sb
1st Jan 2015, 19:03
M.M
That was pretty spectacular. I doubt if they'd allow that over here on 'elf & Safety grounds!

ExXB
1st Jan 2015, 19:07
I never "got" the London Eye, never understood why people want to stand for an hour in a queue when there is a perfectly good museum a stone's throw away.

Went for the second time in July last year. No queues, no waiting ... It did rain though.

Capetonian
1st Jan 2015, 19:16
I have taken visitors on the Eye several times. Pre-booked online, no waiting at all.

con-pilot
1st Jan 2015, 23:07
For anybody who doesn't fly it offers great views of London and is a fun experience. Its popularity is obvious.


I agree, my wife and I have had many opportunities to go on the Eye, but never had any reason to. But as you said, for those that have never flown over London as we have, I’m sure it is a very enjoyable experience for them.

However, I’ve been told that in the summer it can become very warm in the cabs.

ExSp33db1rd
1st Jan 2015, 23:50
.....when there is a perfectly good museum a stone's throw away.

Is it taller then the eye, and can you get on to the roof ?

Pre-booked online, no waiting at all.


I hate you, just like all those Southwest Airline passengers who checked in on line at Midnight plus 1 second and get priority boarding status for the best seats as a result, versus the likes of me, who - used - to drive to the airport, fight the traffic, park, lug my baggage around, arrive at the check-in counter hours before it opened then when it did find that all the "A" queue places had already gone to those still in bed. Grrrrr !

I did learn, if you can't beat them, join them, but what Law states that one must have a computer to live ?

(Nb. the Midnight plus 1 second check in gambit has changed - but I'm not going to tell you how !! )

Tankertrashnav
2nd Jan 2015, 00:42
But as you said, for those that have never flown over London as we have,

Well I've flown over London several times as pax and been on the Eye, and its a totally different experience. Never had the slightest problem with heights when flying but it was a different story on the Eye. I was really quite uncomfortable as we went over the top, but once we started to go down the other side I started to relax, even though we were still a couple of hundred feet up - totally illogical, but thats the way these things are. In retrospect was really pleased I had been on it.

ExSp33db1rd
2nd Jan 2015, 03:25
Yeah, funny thing about heights, flying isn't a problem 'cos you're really not more than a few inches higher than your surroundings, but the edge of a cliff, or similar, is a different story.

con-pilot
2nd Jan 2015, 05:42
Well I've flown over London several times as pax and been on the Eye, and its a totally different experience.

I wasn't talking about a view from being a passenger in an airliner, but the view from the cockpit landing in airports around London, my wife riding on the jump seat, plus a helicopter tour of London that we had. Not a charter helicopter, but a privately owned one, a tour which was simply amazing.

Krystal n chips
2nd Jan 2015, 06:07
Couldn't agree more...flying over London...and for that matter Birmingham...Hull...Leeds....Sheffield is always enjoyable..

Meanwhile, a bit further North in civilisation, a rather unfortunate hiccup in the proceedings.

Metrolink bosses say people are to blame after tram delays New Year fireworks by four minutes - Manchester Evening News (http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/greater-manchester-news/metrolink-bosses-say-people-blame-8369734)

Tankertrashnav
2nd Jan 2015, 09:37
I wasn't talking about a view from being a passenger in an airliner

Agreed Con - I've seen some spectacular cities from the cockpit when in the military - Hong Kong from a Sioux (Bell 47) was quite an experience. However my point was picked up by Ex Speedbird, it is that strange phenomenon that being several hundred feet up in an aircraft is not scary, but on the London Eye it is - to me at any rate!

M.Mouse
2nd Jan 2015, 11:41
Some of you may recall that the Eye was originally owned by British Airways and the design architects Marks Barfield. At the time I entered the internal BA competition and won a ride on the newly opened attraction, the bonus being it was not for just one or two people but an entire capsule full!

I invited friends and family and it was a great experience. Despite me regularly approaching LHR over central London the perspective was different and, of course, gave time to take a lingering look instead of flashing by at 3 or 4 miles a minute!

The sensation of movement is almost imperceptible and the movement (0.6 mph) is also very, very smooth. I dislike heights when on a ladder or similar but had no problem with the Eye.

The Eye attracts approximately 3.75m visitors each year so I would suggest it is a something we, in the UK, have got right!

Capetonian
2nd Jan 2015, 12:25
I have no problem with heights but I am very scared of helicopters. I have been on the London Eye (EdF now I believe) with many people who are scared of heights and none has been more than mildly uncomfortable. I cannot explain the phenomenon.

joy ride
2nd Jan 2015, 12:35
I have used the Thames cable car a few times (bikes can be taken!) but not yet the London Eye. The cable car gives a fine view and gets you across the river; quite fun watching City planes going by.

In fact, if I use my folding bike in combination with Cable Car and Underground/Overground/DLR, I can easily and cheaply access a huge chunk of London, and avoiding the worst roads.

The Eye is higher than the cable car, but goes nowhere; it is also pretty expensive by any standards....for similar money you could get a cheap flight to Europe! I think the Eye is a good addition to London, but a few more cable cars (for pedestrians and cyclists) would be far more useful and affordable.

603DX
2nd Jan 2015, 15:10
My office was just across the Thames at a high level in Dartmouth Street, and I could see the massive wheel gradually rising during its construction in 1999. In Summer 2000 visiting friends from Guernsey kindly treated my wife and I to our first trip on it, and not surprisingly I was able to point out my office to them from the capsule. But being a bit of an engineering nerd, I couldn't resist telling them that the giant spindle and hub supporting us all at that moment had been manufactured by Skoda in the Czech Republic. There was a sudden hush amongst the others with us in the capsule, and I realised that I might have spoken over-loudly. It was no good trying to retrieve the dropped brick by prattling on about them being a highly-respected engineering company in that class of work, the general public image of the firm's cars at that time was still unfairly low. So I got a well-deserved "ear-bending" from my wife ... :uhoh:

London Eye - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Eye)

con-pilot
2nd Jan 2015, 18:44
I have no problem with heights but I am very scared of helicopters.

Not overly fond of helicopters myself, but when I must, I will ride on them. Heights, however, I am afraid of, funny thing is, a lot of pilots I know are the same way. Now if I am in an enclosed area, such the cabs on the Eye, no problem.

But put me on the top of a tall ladder, no way. Or like those guys that climb those really high TV transmission towers, hell no.

Capetonian
2nd Jan 2015, 18:56
This wouldn't worry me at all :


http://uniformtaxclaim.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/construction.jpg


But I can't jump or dive into water, however deep or shallow it might be.

wings folded
2nd Jan 2015, 18:59
Just two thoughts:

Would their pathetic little helmets do much to protect the cranium in the event of a plummet?

Are fluo jackets really needed to draw attention to obvious nutters sat on a beam above a significant void?

con-pilot
2nd Jan 2015, 19:01
This wouldn't worry me at all :


Now that is what I'm talking about, no way in hell. :uhoh:

Solid Rust Twotter
2nd Jan 2015, 19:14
Bloody hell, CT!:eek:

My nuts tried to climb up next to my kidneys just looking at that....

Fareastdriver
2nd Jan 2015, 19:49
There is a picture taken before the war during the construction of the Empire State Building. It show a solitary girder hanging in space on the end of a crane hook, horizontal, with a man standing near one end. As the girder was positioned to be bolted on the building frame his job was to move up and down the girder, (not a lot), to ensure the first end slotted into the right place.

Just a cloth cap and a jacket.

con-pilot
2nd Jan 2015, 19:59
Like this?

http://static.squarespace.com/static/51dc70e1e4b0d1ffe6984ac9/t/521a9ba0e4b0e22c06dafadc/1377475490588/lewis-hine.jpg

G-CPTN
2nd Jan 2015, 20:20
I guess the 'marlin spike' is to line up the holes for the bolts/rivets.

Bolts I suppose, as I see the spike has a spanner for nuts on the top end.

Capetonian
2nd Jan 2015, 20:26
6 Non-Stop Minutes of 2014?s Best Video Clips «TwistedSifter (http://twistedsifter.com/videos/best-of-web-2014/)

Some seriously vertigo inducing videos in the first 65 seconds of this series of clips.

4mastacker
2nd Jan 2015, 20:26
You won't get me up there - I get dizzy just watching this.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mTOChPRuqVw

MadsDad
2nd Jan 2015, 22:38
Capetonian, just one thing about the picture you posted. In the bottom left hand corner you can see some scaffolding that appears to be some sort of safety railing which would be, I would suggest, round the floor below the one being built, about 12 feet or so down.

A fall of that distance wouldn't be pleasant but definitely wouldn't sting as much as a fall from 7-8 hundred feet, implied by the picture.

(I believe some of the Empire State Building pictures of daredevil workers can be explained in a similar way).

Fliegenmong
2nd Jan 2015, 23:23
No way Cape!

boguing
3rd Jan 2015, 00:53
Nobody else has mentioned it, but isn't it slightly ironic to have sixty four Heinkel He111 cockpits moving in close formation over the London skyline?

I took my ex-WWII RAF and Aero Eng Father on it in it's early days and he hadn't spotted it either.

joy ride
3rd Jan 2015, 09:04
The top of the gherkin/condom building also looks like the front of an He 111, or the building could be half of a Zeppelin on its tail.

603DX
3rd Jan 2015, 11:48
I guess the 'marlin spike' is to line up the holes for the bolts/rivets.

Bolts I suppose, as I see the spike has a spanner for nuts on the top end.

Spot on, G-CPTN! It's called a podger spanner, and every steelwork erector uses them as a matter of course.

And in con-pilot's picture of the worker standing on top of a corner stanchion, there's a good view of the superb Chrysler Building behind. If only the designers of the abominable, stark London "Shard" spike of a building had used even half of the architectural skills that William Van Alen applied in creating that beauty ... :ooh:

Low Flier
3rd Jan 2015, 12:45
Some of you may recall that the Eye was originally owned by British Airways

Yup. Also recall when they couldn't raise the structure due to rigging cockup. It didn't take Branson long to send an airship to the locus to take the piss.

http://www.pressat.co.uk/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/ba-cant-get-it-up.jpg

joy ride
3rd Jan 2015, 13:05
I have just cycled along the Thames and back, to go to shops on the wrong side. The ill-conceived Shard, Walkie-Meltie building and all other glass towers were lost in cloud; even Boris's Testicle was faded out near its top.

Despite being very cold, wet and grey, the London skyline looked so much better and more human without all those steel and glass towers looming over it.


Podgers of various sizes and types are also widely used by those in theatrical and scenery and for assembling timpani.

wings folded
3rd Jan 2015, 15:55
The London Eye, like the Eiffel Tower in Paris, is not the only London edifice to have been built for a specific purpose and temporary duration, but to have remained in place after the end of its intended use.

Others are:

Houses of Parliament, to be the seat of legislative decision. Replaced by Berlaymont.

Tower of London, to imprison especially wicked villains. Replaced by HMP Marriott Belmarsh.

Old Bailey, to be the court of trial of alleged wicked villains. Replaced by the European Court of Human Rights.

St Paul's Cathedral, to be the source of spiritual comfort. Replaced by Disneyworld.

Bank of England, to oversee the British economy. Replaced by Standard and Poor's.

Millenium Dome, to contain celebrations of something seen as significant in the calendar. Now used as a visual reference for traffic landing on 09 at LCY.