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rgbrock1
12th Dec 2014, 13:15
Magic Mushrooms Found in Queen Elizabeth's Garden at Buckingham Palace

LONDON — "Shrooms in the queen's garden" may sound like a trippy 1960s song title, but it's actually a fact.
Hallucinogenic mushrooms have been discovered on the grounds of Buckingham Palace in London — which is home to Britain's Queen Elizabeth. Celebrity gardener Alan Titchmarsh spotted the red-and-white fly agaric — also known as Amanita muscaria — while filming a program for U.K. broadcaster ITV (http://www.itv.com/) that will be aired on Christmas Day.
A spokesman for Buckingham Palace confirmed the find. "There are several hundred fungi species in the palace garden, including a small number of naturally occurring fly agaric mushrooms," he said. The fungi are beneficial to trees and help them take in nutrients, he added.
Speaking to The Sun newspaper (http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/), Titchmarsh described the discovery as "a surprise," adding: "I won't be eating any." Neither, it seems, will any members of the royal family. Officials have made clear that fungi from the garden are not used in palace kitchens.

Gertrude the Wombat
12th Dec 2014, 13:42
There weren't any in the tea last time I was there.

MagnusP
12th Dec 2014, 13:50
Wouldn't mind seeing the topiary on the future Queen's magic garden!

wings folded
12th Dec 2014, 13:54
You must be alone in wanting to see Camilla's topiary :yuk:

MagnusP
12th Dec 2014, 14:39
She'll be Queen Consort. I was thinking more of consorting with the next one after her. :ok:

wings folded
12th Dec 2014, 14:45
Thank goodness. You had me worried.

Mind you, after an amarita muscaria omelette, anything might be possible...

No, on afterthought, no.

MagnusP
12th Dec 2014, 14:59
... and just bear in mind, the wingnut was there first. :eek:

wings folded
12th Dec 2014, 15:15
I think not.

Mr Parker Bowles was before him, wasn't he?

Tankertrashnav
12th Dec 2014, 15:47
The Queen of England's Magic Garden

Her Majesty is the Queen of England in the same way that Obama is the President of Connecticut (to pick a state at random!). Among her many titles, the simplest one is Her Majesty Elizabeth the Second, by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and of Her other Realms and Territories Queen, Head of the Commonwealth, Defender of the Faith.

A bit more of a mouthful than POTUS, agreed ;) We tend to find "The Queen" suffices. There are other ones, I know, but does anyone outside their own countries actually know who they are?

Andy_S
12th Dec 2014, 16:25
I think not.

Mr Parker Bowles was before him, wasn't he?

I think half the Army were there before him.......

wings folded
12th Dec 2014, 16:39
Steady there. Could be treasonable, you know.

rgbrock1
12th Dec 2014, 16:40
Have we referenced Camilla Parker Bowles above?

http://www.thepoke.co.uk/wp-content/gallery/wip-2-4-11/funny-pictures-8.jpg

Frau Bleucher.....

airship
13th Dec 2014, 12:24
Do British (horses) also have bad teeth (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/thomas-p-connelly-dds/dental-myths_b_1032949.html)? Any teeth-whiteners for horses out there?

PS. Gertrude the Wombat, mushrooms in tea?! :confused:

VP959
13th Dec 2014, 15:06
The Queen of England's Magic Garden

Her Majesty is the Queen of England in the same way that Obama is the President of Connecticut (to pick a state at random!). Among her many titles, the simplest one is Her Majesty Elizabeth the Second, by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and of Her other Realms and Territories Queen, Head of the Commonwealth, Defender of the Faith.

A bit more of a mouthful than POTUS, agreed We tend to find "The Queen" suffices. There are other ones, I know, but does anyone outside their own countries actually know who they are?

I rather like the heading of my grandfathers commission into the Royal Flying Corps in 1915. It starts:

“George V by the Grace of God, OF GREAT BRITAIN, IRELAND AND THE BRITISH DOMINIONS BEYOND THE SEAS, KING, DEFENDER OF THE FAITH, EMPEROR OF INDIA, &C.”

Blacksheep
13th Dec 2014, 15:06
Ah! A talking horse. Checking up on her old grey mare.

wings folded
13th Dec 2014, 16:21
A talking horse went into a pub and ordered a pint of bitter.

After drinking his pint, he ordered another. The landlord, doubtful of the horse's ability to pay said he could have another after he had paid for the first.

OK, said the horse, how much?

Twelve quid, said the publican, and the horse paid up.

As he drew the horse's second pint, the publican remarked "we don't get many talking horses in here"

"With beer at twelve quid a pint it's not surprising" said the horse.

Sorry, wrong thread...

cavortingcheetah
13th Dec 2014, 16:26
Talking of horses:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vAN_4wgm9t8

airship
13th Dec 2014, 16:39
..."With beer at twelve quid a pint it's not surprising" said the horse.

"I could do you a better price if I served you by the bucketful" offered the publican.

"The dregs...?" snorted the horse.

"No more than what everyone else here is served. Especially once they're on all fours..." the landlord sniffed.

ShyTorque
13th Dec 2014, 17:49
The BBC was incorrect to report the Fly Agaric as "magic mushrooms". They're definitely not the same thing (but probably more newsworthy to call them that).

"Fly Agaric" is Amanita muscaria, the classic pixie mushroom, with a white, warty flecked red cap and a hooded white stem. They were used in some circles in Victorian times and before to induce hallucinations but they are very likely to give you bad intestinal problems as well, make you lose consciousness or even just to poison you to the point of death if you take enough. The long term health effects aren't fully understood, so although they look nice, I'd say they are just poisonous, rather than "magic".

"Magic Mushrom" is Psilocybe semilanceata, and is far less spectacular looking, with a very long thin stem and a rather nondescript, pointed, yellowish grey cap. They are now also a Class A drug (since 2005) and so it's illegal to pick (if you know what they are) or possess them. A few years ago my son went walking and came home with a bag full of them, innocently picked in local woods and supposedly for tea if I OK'd them. No, we didn't eat them! I was certain what they were because there is another way to positively ID them, but be warned - there are a number of similar looking fungi that will just poison you.