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OFSO
11th Dec 2014, 14:14
During exceptionally high winds last week, a tree fell as a train approached. The tree penetrated the drivers cab, missing him, then the rear wall of his compartment, and entered the passenger compartment, penetrating to about 2 metres at just below ceiling height. Nobody was hurt. Subsequently the train was derailed by the same tree. As a frequent train passenger, it makes me think.....


http://i656.photobucket.com/albums/uu287/ROBIN_100/780_0008_5250156_d585eff6baf3543fcd3ad98dc1a39cd5_zpse1bb09f 5.jpg

SpringHeeledJack
11th Dec 2014, 14:19
That was a luck in unluck situation all in all. Another positive is the ugly graffiti has been transformed into a legible word :)


SHJ

N707ZS
11th Dec 2014, 16:31
Our local track was a nice tree-lined route until recently when a chainsaw gang came in and cut the lot down! No selective pruning just a chainsaw massacre, perhaps they should pass the idea to Spain.

ShyTorque
11th Dec 2014, 16:41
As a frequent train passenger, it makes me think.....

As in any form of transport, always sit well away from the scene of the accident!

Noah Zark.
11th Dec 2014, 16:43
Over here, the trains stop when leaves are on the line. It took the whole bloody tree to stop that one. Bravo!

evansb
11th Dec 2014, 17:14
How many Freaks were killed?

RedhillPhil
11th Dec 2014, 17:17
Happens here too.


BBC News - Passengers injured as train hits tree after storms (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-16406196)

Shaggy Sheep Driver
11th Dec 2014, 18:11
My late father in law was a BR civil engineer. He ensured any trees too close to the line were felled before they could cause a problem.

Our local track was a nice tree-lined route until recently when a chainsaw gang came in and cut the lot down! No selective pruning just a chainsaw massacre, perhaps they should pass the idea to Spain.

That's exactly what we need! Look at a picture of any UK railway in the 50s and 60s - tree-free. BR and after them, Network Rail, have not kept on top of controlling lineside vegetation so most of our railways now run through 'green tunnels'. This not only leads to terrible rail adhesion problems when autumn leaves get squished into a slippery paste on the rail (and necessitating the running of hundreds of very expensive railhead treatment trains overnight that don't completely address the problem), but it increases the danger to trains by fallen trees on the line.

NR need to get those chain saws busy - and given the size of the problem due the backlog, get lots of contractors out to clear the track sides of excessive vegetation. It'd improve the view from the trains as well!

N707ZS
11th Dec 2014, 19:37
They chopped the trees but left the Japanese knot weed!

OFSO
11th Dec 2014, 20:36
One small point regarding cutting cuttings and embankments: the winds were gusting in excess of 180 kph when this tree was blown down. So it might have travelled a fair way.

Highest wind speed I've known since living here was 204 kph recorded just around the corner from us at Port Bou.

Blues&twos
11th Dec 2014, 21:06
At Lavington, Wiltshire, UK in July 2010, this high speed train also hit a tree which had fallen at right angles across the track at cab height. No-one seriously injured, despite the impact speed being 90mph (145kph).

http://www.raib.gov.uk/cms_resources.cfm?file=/110407_R082011_Lavington.pdf

Page 19 shows a close up of the damaged HST cab.
:eek:

west lakes
11th Dec 2014, 21:14
NR need to get those chain saws busy - and given the size of the problem due the backlog, get lots of contractors out to clear the track sides of excessive vegetation.

Yeah we do the same with powerlines where trees and stuff have grown into them, it would surprise you the number of folk who will not give permission for trees to be cut down or even trimmed.

In NRs case any that are on boundaries could well belong to others so they will have the same problems

G-CPTN
11th Dec 2014, 21:29
it would surprise you the number of folk who will not give permission for trees to be cut down or even trimmed.

Is there not an 'obligation' to keep the overheads free from obstructions such as trees?

I have always welcomed the 'Electricity Board' onto my land to cut back the branches (and even remove saplings that would cause future problems).

Do you mean that a landowner can refuse access/removal?

west lakes
11th Dec 2014, 21:48
Is there not an 'obligation' to keep the overheads free from obstructions such as trees?


There is, but it falls onto the leccy company not landowners


Do you mean that a landowner can refuse access/removal?
They certainly can, we've been threatened with TPOs in the past even though they don't apply to us!
i can think of one leylandi hedge that we cannot cut more than 6in from an 11kV line because of the landowner. Even the argument that it will affect his supply holds no weight with them. And not to mention the "green" lobby who see tree cutting as pure vandalism!

Blues&twos
11th Dec 2014, 22:13
The other problem with lineside vegetation is that it interferes with sighting distances, not only for signals etc from the cab, but also for pedestrians at user worked crossings.

MagnusP
12th Dec 2014, 09:01
Westie, does that mean that I could get BT to pollard my laburnum which is growing near to a 'phone line? :ok:

G-CPTN
12th Dec 2014, 10:45
No - BT will only act to restore their connection - believe me I have 'been there and tried that'.

The telephone lines to several properties were in great danger of being snapped by the wind-induced movement of branches of a neighbour's tree.
I contacted BT and suggested that they could avoid the resulting disconnection by arranging to prune the offending branches but they 'refused' saying that the responsibility lay firmly with the owner of the tree.
They would send out an engineer to inspect the situation at a charge of 140 (payable by me) but were unable to effect the pruning.
I pointed out that in the event of a storm, the disconnection could result in a call-out in inclement weather, but BT were firm in that they couldn't undertake preventative action - only restitution of a failed connection.

Long story - the local authority imposed a TPO when the tree owner applied for permission to remove/reduce the tree - until eventually the owner got an arboriculturalist's report condemning the tree - which has since been removed.

MagnusP
12th Dec 2014, 10:53
Oh bother! Looks like I have to bribe next-door's gardener again, then. ;)

tupungato
14th Dec 2014, 15:04
Some news show interior images of the penetrated cabin.