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General_Kirby
9th Dec 2014, 14:51
Been winding me up for some time now. I have a satnav gubbins which I always try to mount as out of the way as possible. In my opinion the windscreen is for looking out of, not for cluttering with gadgets. It's shocking the amount of motorists I see who mount these things in their direct sight line smack bang in centre of the screen. I even saw a Police car with a similar setup! Sat navs at eye level will obscure just about everything at the right distance/angle. Motorcyclists/Cyclists especially so.
Another case of the worldwide common sense drain?

Fareastdriver
9th Dec 2014, 14:58
Mount it high on the centre of the windscreen just below the rear view mirror. That means that when you are gawking at the satnav and run into the back of the car in front you can see the car that is going to run into the back of you.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
9th Dec 2014, 15:30
The last journey I used GPS on.

"At the end of the road, turn right. You are on the Trans Canada Highway."
"After 3,481 kilometres, turn right."
"After 780m, you have arrived at your destination"

Doesn't really matter where I put the GPS ;)

Cyber Bob
9th Dec 2014, 15:48
Keep mine on my lap along with my mobile phone

dazdaz1
9th Dec 2014, 17:11
BOB....."Keep mine on my lap along with my mobile phone" have you considered the ramifications of those radio waves so close to the crown jewels :eek:

I use a circular (retail stores) adhesive base to mount the sucker holder on. Another alternative is a heavy bean bag thingy where you just plonk on the dashboard to hold the sat nav in place.

Sat navs do need a field of view to the sky to work. Having said that, some car manufactures incorporate (very fine wires) for demisting the screen, sat navs don't like those, plays havoc with sat reception.

Daz

Shaggy Sheep Driver
9th Dec 2014, 17:21
It's shocking the amount (sic) of motorists I see who mount these things in their direct sight line smack bang in centre of the screen.

They don't call 'em 'Tw*t Navs' for nothing!

Hobo
9th Dec 2014, 17:24
Position the suction cup bracket horizontally at 90 degrees to the back of the screen screen then jam it in a central dashboard air vent grill.

Krystal n chips
9th Dec 2014, 18:03
Wonderful devices.....map, road signs, Mk 1 eyeball and functioning brain.....

Makes you wonder how we ever coped without sat nav for all those years really.....

Edited to say, can be useful for the last mile or so and in rural areas for homes etc....other than that.

ChrisVJ
9th Dec 2014, 18:15
Fox3

Yup, done that. Wonderful place Canada.

SMT Member
9th Dec 2014, 18:44
other than that.

It's a great help when traversing Europe by car, or just going from one part of the country you know, to another that you don't via roads you've never been on before.

It's also very nice to be directed off the motorway, and enjoying a hassle free ride on a country road running parallel to heavy congestion.

Another nice feature, when you've found yourself having been on the road for far many hours than planned and starting to feel tired, is the ability to find all the nearby hotels, and direct you to one of your choice. Will even display the phone number, allowing you to call first and ask for room availability.

All in all, it's a very neat invention indeed. That a couple of reactionary GOS don't like it, well, nothing new in that.

Capetonian
9th Dec 2014, 18:53
GPS is great for decision support and for driving in urban areas where you can't stop to look at the map. Otherwise, I prefer to read a conventional map.

I have tried having it in the top corner of the windscreen on the driver's side. Came back to the conclusion that the least bad place to have it is just below the rear view mirror, as you are then only taking your eyes off what you should be looking at for a brief moment and the road is still well in the peripheral field of view.

west lakes
9th Dec 2014, 19:12
Top right of the screen in present car, bottom left in the previous 2 (and the next one)
That's along with reversing camera/caravan rear view monitor (top of screen next to mirror), forward view camera (other side of mirror) tyre pressure monitor for caravan (bottom left) & mobile phone bluetooth (same location).
The car actually has fitted Bluetooth for a mobile but I have a work & a personal one so need two devices.

Solid Rust Twotter
9th Dec 2014, 19:35
GPS, eh?

Funny, I've always preferred doing my own thinking.:hmm:

Shaggy Sheep Driver
9th Dec 2014, 20:16
GPS has its uses especially in an aeroplane, or on a motorbike in the rain where map reading isn't really an option. It's also good for 'the last mile' in an unfamiliar city.

But many seem to rely on them for journeys where they just ain't required for 99% of the time. Worse, they don't think about what the magic box is telling them.Thus you get a van driver in Essex using one to go to a village 20 miles away but inputs the wrong destination. It isn't until he's passing Carlisle on the M6 northbound that he even begins to query what the 'idiot box' is telling him!

And there have been cases of motorists, on being told to "take the next left turn" turning left at a level crossing and attempting to drive along a railway line!

On a less exceptional level, they encourage a lack of basic geographical knowledge. If you don't actually know that Carlisle is well north of Essex, as is Luton, Birmingham, Manchester, and Lancaster passed on the way you might not question it. But you have to be particularly thick not to wonder why a journey of a few miles is taking several hours, surely?

So, IMO useful devices, but with the potential to encourage geographical stupidity.

west lakes
9th Dec 2014, 20:22
So my employer has some tens of thousands of substations, switching points and pole mounted equipment in this part of the country.
All of which I may be asked to visit particularly if working outside my regular patch
Everyone of them is included in a file on our Sat Nav devices so we can get to them without any problems.

GPS does have it's uses

Seldomfitforpurpose
9th Dec 2014, 20:27
GPS does have it's uses


Could not agree more but as technology holds no fear for me I would, also might explain some others problems :ok:

gruntie
9th Dec 2014, 20:31
Never used the damn things: but have it on good authority that the circular imprint the sucker leaves on the windscreen is a sign to the great unwashed that the car is worth breaking into as there's likely to be a satnav hidden within it.

Fox3WheresMyBanana
9th Dec 2014, 20:38
Driving up the I-95 three years ago, the radio started feeding the TV audio about a string of tornados crossing the State. By grabbing the map book I'd brought along, I was able to plot the tracks and choose a safe route/speed. No chance of that with GPS. 24 died. I was also able to call ahead and book a different hotel. The one I'd originally booked was severely damaged two hours later.

https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=zGbg_ib4xKck.k-j8Ywd1PpsU&msa=0&hl=en&ie=UTF8&t=m&vpsrc=6&ll=35.782171,-78.75&spn=2.138967,3.674927&z=8&source=embed

Cyber Bob
9th Dec 2014, 20:46
DazDaz. You've gone and done it. You've made an assumption

PTT
9th Dec 2014, 20:49
For those whose phones double as a satnav there is this excellent piece of kit: SPIDERPODIUM | BreffoŽ (http://www.breffo.com/pages/spiderpodium)

http://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0158/3738/products/home-left-right-image-1_grande_1024x1024.png?v=1405346590

Blues&twos
9th Dec 2014, 23:14
I rarely use mine, preferring to use maps for the long cross country routes, but sat navs are fantastic for finding specific addresses when you get close in. Wish they'd been about when I was doing deliveries.

My pet hate back then was houses which just had names, no number. You had no clue even which side of the 3 mile long country lane it might be on. No mobile phones then either, so you couldn't even give the recipient a buzz to ask for directions. Infuriating. :)

Yamagata ken
9th Dec 2014, 23:27
Wonderful device. Mine's built into the centre of the dash, where it belongs. The actual 'satnav' bit is of limited value to me, unless the memsahib is present, as its all in Japanese with no English language option.

The moving map is fantastic. In the past year I've twice had to cicumnavigate Tokyo, entering from the north to get to Haneda airport in the SW. The Tokyo expressway system is mostly elevated, two-lane and walled. It is quite complex, and when the traffic is moving, things happen fairly briskly. 'Intimidating' would be an appropriate adjective. Armed with a printed out diagram, both trips were seamless. Bravo.

It's a long drive, leaving home at 2pm, arriving back at 6am. The trick is coffee and chocolate, with the chocolate being the super-special ingredient.

Ken Borough
9th Dec 2014, 23:55
Thus you get a van driver in Essex using one to go to a village 20 miles away but inputs the wrong destination. It isn't until he's passing Carlisle on the M6 northbound that he even begins to query what the 'idiot box' is telling him!

Absolute gold! :D:D:D

The NRMA (AA equivalent in New South Wales) recommend that sat nav units be placed as close as possible to the pillar and dashboard on the right hand side of the vehicle. (That would be LH side for those who drive on the LH side of their cars). Their recommendation makes perfect sense to me, having adopted and used it for some time.

G-CPTN
10th Dec 2014, 00:30
Mine's built into the centre of the dash
Mine too - it came as an unwanted extra, but I have found it useful for navigating through complex housing estates or remote rural lanes (usually without street signs).
Of course a postcode usually covers several houses - which might be spread over a wide area if rural.

Another useful (but sometimes confusing) feature is when you take a wrong turning - the SatNav will redirect you - better in urban locations rather than rural locations which can result in being routed through deep fords suitable only for agricultural vehicles or 'country lanes' unsuitable for vehicular traffic.
The SatNav does have the option of fastest route, shortest route or easiest route - unfortunately there is no 'economical' option.
Shortest route is the one that throws up 'impossible' roads - as I found out when the easiest route involved a lengthy diversion around a 'mountain' which I felt probably had an alternative route.

If you really do know the area and have a preferred route you just ignore the recommendations and the system recalculates its alternative route within a few seconds.

What tends to happen is when towns have been by-passed, the SatNav will recommend heading directly through the town centre - which instigates a delay when you have to wait for a gap in traffic when you rejoin the route.

When programmed with a route (even though you know exactly where you are going) it prompts you when you approach a fixed speed-camera - reminding you of the limit based on your actual speed.

It is also useful when deciding which of two completely different routes (for example, A69/A74M/A702 (107 miles 2 hours)or A68/A702 (100 miles 2˝ hours) - separated by 40 miles of non-negotiable terrain - though experience and a paper map work just as well. Another optional route (also best planned using a road atlas) is Scotch Corner to Corbridge via A68 (50 miles direct - 1 hour) or A1M (60 miles - 1 hour) - the longer route probably uses less fuel and is (usually) less stressful depending on 'rush hours' and inclement weather (neither of which feature in the SatNav calculation of course).
Tow Law in the winter can be difficult due to fog or impassible due to snow and ice.

tartare
10th Dec 2014, 00:58
Mounted on the bottom right hand side of windscreen on driver's side in the Vulvo.
Out of line of sight, but a quick glance to the side means it can be checked.
And changed the voice from bleedin' annoying Orstraylian chick, to dulcet Charlotte Green-type British tones...

Ken Borough
10th Dec 2014, 01:07
changed the voice from bleedin' annoying Orstraylian chick, to dulcet Charlotte Green-type British tones...

I've done the same thing. Better than the English charlie would be a Seth Effriken who, I think, have the best diction of all English speakers.

tartare
10th Dec 2014, 01:20
Really?
Every time I hear seth efrikin I think of people giving blicks a darm gude shambocking...

gupta
10th Dec 2014, 01:53
My biggest gripe with the built-in versions is that they can't be programmed on the fly - I know that's so the driver doesn't get distracted while driving but surely the makers must realise that there may be a passenger who could do the setting?

I also struck this lockout feature on a portable Garmin hired with an Avis vehicle.

Loose rivets
10th Dec 2014, 03:04
I have an idea that might be switch-offable.


I don't put mine near the mirror anymore as my eyes would alight on the screen every time. Directional images are naturally reversed in that location so I'd think, Bloody hell, I'm going backwards!


I've recently started putting mine slightly to the right of my right hand i.e. bottom right of the screen. Now I'm wearing bifocals more it's spot on in focus without turning my nose to the ceiling.

John Hill
10th Dec 2014, 07:20
On top of the dash in the centre of the car.

Capetonian
10th Dec 2014, 07:25
The TomTom (and I suppose other makes) have options regarding the orientation of the map. I prefer 'north at the top' so that I can see which way I'm going as if reviewing my progress on a map, whereas it seems that most people, especially of the fairer sex, prefer the map to rotate so that you are always heading towards the top of the screen.

I admit that sometime in towns with one way systems where I lose my sense of direction anyway I sometimes use that option, but out in the open (where you don't really need the device anyway) I prefer the former. I do my level best to avoid going into towns anyway and specially by car.

John Hill
10th Dec 2014, 07:31
Alternative mounting position...
https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7569/15988176592_ebebe078d5.jpg

...there is very little that cannot be fixed with sticky tape and/or sheet metal screws.:rolleyes:

ExSp33db1rd
10th Dec 2014, 07:33
Don't use one in the car but find it useful in the Microlight - especially when I forgot to remove the airspeed pitot tube cover, the GPS ground speed reading served me well. Mrs. ExS - who prefers a lot of Boeing around her - never did notice ! (Ooops ! )

Guess it's like all new electronic toys, great Servants but terrible Masters, so keep reminding it who's in charge.

Buster Hyman
10th Dec 2014, 07:45
Low on the centre console for me. Between the gearstick and the heating/cooling controls. Not in my eyesight so I rely on the voice prompts when I need to use it.

Oh, and it's not permanently mounted there but even when it's removed, the tell tale brackets are quite out of sight for would be thieves.

Blacksheep
10th Dec 2014, 08:38
My biggest gripe with the built-in versions is that they can't be programmed on the fly.Mine can. I just talk to it and it executes the command.

I think it's got militaristic tendencies - "I vos just follovink orders!"

UniFoxOs
10th Dec 2014, 08:41
Definitely like Westie's setup, with the Twatnav and rearview camera display covering the two points at the top of the screen where the sun visor doesn't and the sun shines into my eyes now and for the next 6 months.

I put ours low in the centre so the pax can reach it for any plan changes - like findig the nearest LPG station. This, of course, means I have had to make a sun visor extension to cure the above problem.

I see that HUD is now becoming available in satnav, anybody tried it yet?

Smeagol
10th Dec 2014, 08:48
As used by some others above:

Lower right corner of screen (RHD vehicle). Does not obscure vision and can be viewed with eye movement only.

Agree with most that these gizmos are useful for the final stage of a journey to unfamiliar territory, particularly urban areas. I have no problem driving several hundred miles across country after viewing a map and (possibly) making a few notes of major rote numbers in sequence as an aide memoire.

Usually keep mine in place on long journeys (even though I DO know where I am going) in order to have the GPS based speed available (useful on long stretches of dual carriageway roadworks - set the cruise to the appropriate speed limit based on satnav rather than speedometer which frequently allows a leisurely cruise in the outside lane slowly passing the solid line of traffic in the left lane). Also, as stated by others, any deviation from th e route will be automatically compensated for.

Finally, I have changed the voice to that provided by a very sexy South Effrican lady, Lisel (?). Just for a change!

tartare
10th Dec 2014, 09:07
Buster - funny that - I do the same thing from time to time.
Rationale being, listening to it is fine, looking at it (when in fact one should have one's eyes outside the cockpit at all times) is an invitation to a mid-air with another road user, or controlled flight into a stationary object.
So if the suction cup plays up, and it won't stick to the lower right hand side of the windscreen, it gets stuck in the centre storage bin, from whence the nice British lady announces the waypoints.
I do wish they'd add some more aviation related functions though.
Like altitude, QNH, magnetic heading.

ExXB
10th Dec 2014, 09:45
The NRMA (AA equivalent in New South Wales) recommend that sat nav units be placed as close as possible to the pillar and dashboard on the right hand side of the vehicle. (That would be LH side for those who drive on the LH side of their cars). Their recommendation makes perfect sense to me, having adopted and used it for some time.

Exactly where mine is (LH). Low enough that it does not obstruct my view out the window.

I take it with me when travelling and will be renting a car. Invaluable for getting in/out of rental car parks* (Manchester - your signing sucks!), telling you which way on the ring road to go, and which lane to be in. Start to finish useful.

Before setting off I set the departure point as 'home' (or enter it as a favorite).

Ancient Mariner
10th Dec 2014, 09:56
My Skoda has the colour satnav centrally located in the dashboard, and cleverly a simplified , monochrome slave located between the rev counter and speedometer. I listen to the English lady ( The Viking one sucks) and are given very clear visual indication of roundabouts, remaining distances and other essential information straight ahead.
Very useful.
Per

Buster Hyman
10th Dec 2014, 09:56
Tartare...mines there permanently. The only 'obstruction' that impedes my view is the dash cam, and that sits to the left of my rear view mirror, so it's basically an extension of the mirror.

west lakes
10th Dec 2014, 09:57
I do wish they'd add some more aviation related functions though.
Like
altitude, QNH, magnetic heading.


I changed the voice to a Canadian ATCO, drives SWIMBO mad as doesn't get most of the terms used!

Capetonian
10th Dec 2014, 10:00
Before setting off I set the departure point as 'home' (or enter it as a favorite). I was warned when I bought my first Satnav that it is not a good idea to enter your real home address, since anyone who steals the device will know you're not there.

Sallyann1234
10th Dec 2014, 10:04
I use a satnav app on my smartphone, but I don't trouble to mount it on view.
I find that the verbal instructions are quite sufficient and as the song says "I keep my eyes on the road ahead"

G-CPTN
10th Dec 2014, 10:20
it is not a good idea to enter your real home address
My 'home' setting is not my actual location, but a nearby housing estate with no direct access to the correct street.
I ignore the final instructions to effect a go-around.

west lakes
10th Dec 2014, 10:46
My 'home' setting is not my actual location, but a nearby housing estate with no direct access to the correct street.

I set mine as the nearest Police Station to home! :E

MagnusP
10th Dec 2014, 10:51
Ditto, Westie. However, the new one for MrsP's car fits in the central armrest, and uses the main display screen, so there are no tell-tale marks on the windscreen that would attract a thief.

Capetonian
10th Dec 2014, 11:14
I set mine as the nearest Police Station to home!Smart. Thinking that through, I'm inclined to set mine to the local rubbish tip or, if I can find one, a public toilet known as a gay pickup site, or a 'dogging' site!

Windy Militant
10th Dec 2014, 11:29
Use Sat NAV for work it used to be useful for live traffic and has on several occasions got me out of long holdups on the M6 over the last few years.
Although at the moment it's not a well Sat Nav I think the batteries on the way out so it doesn't connect with the traffic server as well as it used to.
On the works Galaxy I sucker it onto the right hand quarter light low down touching the dash if I can get the thing to stick there!
The moving Map is a big help for on the fly DIY diversions especially in urban areas and the compass is handy as it sometimes flags up those doh moments when having followed the rubbish signage the UK has you find yourself on a reciprocal heading to the one you should be on.:O
It's also fun to have someone to shout at when it's obviously doing something daft, mine's obsessed with trying to get me to drive over those bouncing bollards on bus lanes.
Also as mentioned when the traffic goes pear shaped it gives you an idea as to how late you're going to be so you can decide to keep going or stop and give a heads up on a new ETA.
Having said that I also have a look at the route and destination on a certain mapping system before setting out to see if there are any obvious howling errors in the route and also to check the post code. According to the data base my mums house doesn't exist. My cousins farm is about three miles outside of the post code zone allocated to her post code. If they have visitors they get them to go to the local post office and call from there, then they go and escort them in!

TWT
10th Dec 2014, 12:32
I set mine as the nearest Police Station to home!

Navigate to 'home' on my satnav and you'll be parked outside the main gates of the large prison across town

Fox3WheresMyBanana
10th Dec 2014, 12:43
Navigate to 'home' on my satnav app and you find my door open. Go in and make yourself a cuppa. Have a biscuit too! :ok:

dazdaz1
10th Dec 2014, 16:01
Cyber Bob... "DazDaz. You've gone and done it. You've made an assumption"..... Stupid boy! Having said that and putting Bob 'in his place':p I've re-read the posts #1

I've come to the conclusion that the majority of posters are anti sat nav, myself included when I bought my first one, just to try it out. My first concerns were "In 50 yards turn left" I thought I had a mental/visual perspective of what is 50 yards, not so especially when two left turns are 10-15 yards apart. This leads me to the crux of my post.

One needs to experiment with the sat nav, it's not a plug and play as most hardware, one needs to gain driving experience using the sat nav. Fantastic bit of kit, you just need time to learn how to utilize it.

End of lesson.

superq7
10th Dec 2014, 16:16
Your spot on Daz, as you say the sat nav isn't a plug and go device but when mastered are a brilliant piece of kit, ideal for me finding an address while driving my skip truck around the Bristol area no more stopping to look at a dog eared A to Z.

ian16th
10th Dec 2014, 16:42
tartare

I do wish they'd add some more aviation related functions though.
Like altitude, QNH, magnetic heading. Some units have the capability, they just need a little DIY to activate the functions.

This guy:
Joghurts GPS-Site with self written plugins and tools like ExecutionHelper v1.x, Daylight v1.x, Silence, Suit, Calculator, FuelControl, Blackout, Screenshot, ExecutionHelper v2.x, Daylight v2.x, Timesync, Flashlight, NearlySilent, ThirdPartyMenu, InA (http://gps.dg4sfw.de/)

hacks some TomTom units to display more info.

Dunno if you want to risk it :ooh:

Cyber Bob
14th Dec 2014, 10:37
DazDaz - my earlier post stands, in that you have made an assumption that:

a) I have a set of 'Crown Jewels'
b) That I am a fella

So, as my initial statement is correct it can hardly render me stupid.

All the best
CB

PS. It is you who have been put in your place I do believe :ok:

spInY nORmAn
14th Dec 2014, 20:36
Or go with a HUD display such as this although it seems like some of the online community think that this would be too distracting.

pKL4PJICS40

cumulusrider
14th Dec 2014, 22:04
A couple of years ago I was in the control for a gliding competition. A competitor had landed out and phoned us to say he was safe and had contacted his crew to collect him with the trailer. 4 hours later the crew phoned to say had reached the coordinates given but couldn't find the pilot.
It was then we discovered that he had entered 1.5 degrees east in his sat nav rather than 1.5 west. The pilot had to sleep in his cockpit overnight.

was gingernut
14th Dec 2014, 22:07
Just borrowed a book from the local library "Cornwall Walks" (Jarrold 2008). It boast's that all the walks are include "GPS Waypoints."

Said waypoints are in an "OS" format. SK &*^ )*&They don't translate well to either phone or the Tom Tom thing

BillHicksRules
15th Dec 2014, 10:37
The Luddite level is high in this thread.

"I prefer to use a map" :ugh:

SatNav is an aid to the driver nothing more.

There are as many idiots letting it dictate where they go as there were before.

A map and compass are only as good as the person using them.

Having watched a group of Air Cadets trying to orient a map using a compass whilst standing under a power pylon never underestimate stupidity. It took them a while to figure out why the compass needle was spinning. I think they got it on the 4 rotation. 10 cadets walking an circle whilst staring at a compass is always something to make you laugh!!

ian16th
15th Dec 2014, 11:54
It was then we discovered that he had entered 1.5 degrees east in his sat nav rather than 1.5 west. The pilot had to sleep in his cockpit overnight. I currently reside between 30°S and 31°S, and 30°E and 31°E, this makes me very careful when entering coordinates :eek:

Shaggy Sheep Driver
15th Dec 2014, 13:50
SatNav is an aid to the driver nothing more.
There are as many idiots letting it dictate where they go as there were before.
A map and compass are only as good as the person using them.


Yeah but, it takes a certain level of intelligence to interpret a map especially if orienting to a compass. The twa-t Nav is an 'idiot box' that any idiot can and does follow - to the wrong place in the opposite direction to that required, down a railway line, or a byway far too small for a motor vehicle.

twa-t navs are useful if used with intelligence, but they also can and do encourage stupidity and geographical ignorance; maps do the opposite.