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Discorde
5th Dec 2014, 19:24
The old gags are being resurrected:

'Vote Liberal or we'll shoot your dog.'

'I'll be b*ggered if I join the Liberal Party.'

SpringHeeledJack
5th Dec 2014, 19:25
I seem to recall that there was a dog involved, perhaps a Great Dane ? Thorpe reminded me of a typical actor of the time.



SHJ

superq7
5th Dec 2014, 19:33
Bunnies can (and will) go to France.

I remember that bit.

Limeygal
5th Dec 2014, 19:35
Probably my favourite joke of all time:

What do Jeremy Thorpe and William the Conqueror have in common?

They are both f**king Normans. :)

(too soon?)

LGS6753
5th Dec 2014, 20:17
One year my sister put a cut-out photograph of Jeremy Thorpe on the top of her Xmas tree instead of a fairy....

Capetonian
5th Dec 2014, 20:27
He was going to emigrate but he didn't want to leave his chums behind.

(One for the apostrophe police perhaps.)

OFSO
5th Dec 2014, 20:27
Exonerated by the Courts but the public weren't fooled......

tony draper
5th Dec 2014, 20:50
Could have sworn I posted all me Jeremy Thorpe witticisms somewhere yesterday.:rolleyes:

charliegolf
5th Dec 2014, 21:02
Vaseline instructions for use: Apply Liberally! A fave from the 70s.

CG

SpringHeeledJack
5th Dec 2014, 21:22
Well, at least he hasn't appeared on any of the lists of miscreants that have been doing the rounds in the press over the last 2 years. Shame that he felt the need to marry 2 women if he was really homosexual.


SHJ

teeteringhead
5th Dec 2014, 21:44
Shame that he felt the need to marry 2 women if he was really homosexual. You have to remember Jack, it was illegal (the act, not being so) until 1967,

Or maybe he just swung both ways?

G-CPTN
5th Dec 2014, 21:50
He probably had it forced into him at Eton.

Sir George Cayley
5th Dec 2014, 22:16
Was that Eton John?

SGC

RedhillPhil
5th Dec 2014, 23:35
I seem to remember a Private Eye headline of "Buggers can't be losers".

johngreen
5th Dec 2014, 23:38
Another witticism from that era: How do you seat four Liberals on one bar stool?


Turn it upside down...




I am sure there are far worse to come.


So to speak....

Tankertrashnav
6th Dec 2014, 00:07
Just been listening to Jeremy Thorpe - the Silent Conspiracy presented by Tom Mangold on Radio 4. On the principle that you cant libel someone after they are dead, this programme was obviously "in the can" waiting to be broadcast as soon as he was dead. A fascinating programme, one point made was that if Heath's offer to Thorpe to join him in a coalition had been accepted by the Liberal party (Thorpe was in favour) it would have been inevitable that Thorpe would have been offered a cabinet post. With Thorpe wide open to blackmail, the security implications must have been obvious. Interesting that in only a few years, with some MPs in senior posts openly gay, such a problem would no longer apply.

It makes you think that that one law which criminalised homosexual activities must have provided the security services with a fair percentage of their work load. Now they have more serious things to worry about, it's good that they don't have to waste their time grubbing around in people's sex lives!

BBC Radio 4 - Jeremy Thorpe: The Silent Conspiracy (http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04wz633)

PLovett
6th Dec 2014, 04:12
Peter Cook - Trial Judge

BOAC
6th Dec 2014, 08:13
I recall there was a pilot (BIA co?) mixed up in all the blackmail/dog stuff - ??Andrew something?? (thus giving the thread an aviation link....)

teeteringhead
6th Dec 2014, 09:21
it would have been inevitable that Thorpe would have been offered a cabinet post. Widely believed to have been Foreign Secretary.

Particularly interesting as the first news of his - er :O - interests came to the Security Service from the FBI, after Thorpe (allegedly) had an "incident" with an NYC rent boy which came to the FBI's notice - and that would have been in Hoover's time too! :eek:

Flying Lawyer
6th Dec 2014, 10:09
I recall there was a pilot (BIA co?) mixed up in all the blackmail/dog stuff - ??Andrew something??

Andrew Newton gave evidence for the prosecution at Jeremy Thorpe's trial claiming that he had been hired by middle-men to murder Norman Scott. He shot Scott's dog. (Scott claimed to have had a homosexual relationship with Thorpe.)
All defendants, including Thorpe, were acquitted.
Andrew Newton, who preferred to be called 'Gino', was variously described as an airline pilot, former airline pilot and a maverick.
After the trial, he changed his name to Hann Redwin.

http://www.pprune.org/non-airline-transport-stuff/39915-andrew-gino-newton-british-island-airways.html


it would have been inevitable that Thorpe would have been offered a cabinet post.
Almost certainly.
Heath was obsessed with taking the UK into what was then described as the 'Common Market', needed the support of the (then) Liberal party MPs and was given it.

BOAC
6th Dec 2014, 11:48
Yes, FL - I kept out of that thread to protect a friend and PPRune. At one point in the 70's I believe, 'Gino' was flying the Herald with BIA. Newton went on with an interesting life re Caroline Mayorcas and her unfortunate demise.

Quango - Some Things Are More Interesting Than The Tories | VICE | United Kingdom (http://www.vice.com/en_uk/read/quango-some-things-more-interesting-than-tories-conservatives-gay-scandal-dead-dog)

Flying Lawyer
6th Dec 2014, 12:11
Yes, I'd forgotten that until I googled him this morning.
He'd changed his name to Hann Redwin, which some commentators noted was as an anagram of 'Winner Hand'.

An 'interesting' life indeed if it's the same Hann Redwin that a quick google search revealed.
I decided against posting the image.

BOAC
6th Dec 2014, 15:00
If that's the one in 'Rubber Gear' I don't blame you:eek:

A fascinating period in recent history, and as was said:-

"The only 'smoking gun' which could still be out there would have to be in the possession of Andrew Newton (aka Hann Redwin) but casting doubt on his trustworthiness was one of the few areas where Mr Justice Cantley was on the money in 1979."

I was aware that certain related 'papers' were in the posession of a friend at the time, but I guess following the ?'directed'? jury verdict the whole thing fizzled out. I assume it went to the grave with Hann.

One has to feel sorry for family and ex's of JT really now it has all bubbled up again.

BUT just imagine a paedo with access to military, political or security info - which particular member of the establishment were you concerned about....:eek:

Why do I shudder when I see Heath mentioned in the same post as Thorpe? If you read the 'bloggers' about Heath and Saville's supposed 'working relationship' and chuck in Thorpe (and possibly another high-profile member of the 'establishment' of the time recently 'in the news' over paedophilia) if makes you wonder.

Tankertrashnav
6th Dec 2014, 16:39
One has to feel sorry for family and ex's of JT really now it has all bubbled up again.

Agreed BOAC. Although I found Tom Mangold's programme interesting I did feel a bit guilty listening to it - on reflection I think the BBC might have at least have waited till Thorpe was in the ground before broadcasting it.

VP959
6th Dec 2014, 16:55
By a very bizarre coincidence, I ended up doing some work for Hann Redwin around 10 years ago. He was living in West London and was interested in an aircraft kit, and sought some advice on getting it through airworthiness approval. I had absolutely no idea he was in any way connected with the Thorpe affair at all, but do remember thinking that he was a bit eccentric. Somewhere I still have a file about his proposed project, but I never actually met him, I only spoke to him on the phone a few times and exchanged a few letters. I do remember he kept trying to persuade me to have a meeting with him in London, but I couldn't spare the time. I didn't hear any more from him and having just Googled his name I now know why; he died in 2005, not that long after our last exchange of correspondence.

ETOPS
6th Dec 2014, 17:11
Some wit at the time described one of the main players as "Scott of the arse antics"..

SpringHeeledJack
6th Dec 2014, 18:19
I only spoke to him on the phone a few times and exchanged a few letters. I do remember he kept trying to persuade me to have a meeting with him in London, but I couldn't spare the time. I didn't hear any more from him and having just Googled his name I now know why; he died in 2005, not that long after our last exchange of correspondence.

Apologies for thread drift, but I've often wondered when contact has been lost with non-close persons if such a fate has befallen them as above. When I first started ppruning there was a poster from Leeds who posted that he's just come from the hospital where he'd been told he had 4 weeks to live and was in shock etc, perhaps it was on Agony Aunt. It seemed so outlandish that he only posted it to strangers that I assumed he was attention seeking and dryly advised him to spend his remaining time with loved ones instead of electronic strangers. He seemed to fade away thereafter and I wonder….



SHJ

victor tango
6th Dec 2014, 19:02
If you are involved with a death of "a close one" sometimes its too much to bear the usual quicksand of condolences.
You go "online" and the mostly decent responses are a balm because they are without baggage/honest/and in the main,helpful.

Tankertrashnav
6th Dec 2014, 23:39
Bit of thread drift prompted by the last few posts. I have just today been prompted by Facebook to send birthday greetings to an old chum, a former Vulcan AEO as it happens. Trouble is the guy died over two years ago and in spite of the best efforts of his relatives FB will still not remove him from the site. I wont exaggerate and say that it upsets me particularly, but it must be very upsetting for his close relatives.

Evanelpus
7th Dec 2014, 09:08
Norman Scott bites yer dog, Jeremy Thorpe bites yer pillow...........or was it the other way round

richjp
10th Dec 2014, 11:14
Hann Redwin was alive and well four years ago, because I spoke to him!


He used to attend various modern jive or ceroc venues in west London which is where I first met him. He struck up a conversation with me in a pub afterwards one evening and I had a few brief chats with him subsequently. I certainly found him a bit unusual to say the least and when someone told me who he really was, I stayed clear of him from then on.


I stopped going to those venues about seven years ago but then bumped into him by chance in a bar in London four years ago. I could not avoid him so just had a short how are you type conversation and moved on. He always looked like the sort of bloke who exercised regularly to keep fit and he looked fine on that occasion, although obviously illness can bring anyone down.


The Telegraph obviously has got something wrong even if it is just the date of his death. Who knows, perhaps he has changed his name again and engineered his own disappearance?

jm000
4th Jun 2018, 14:12
RichJP,
Would you be happy to speak to me about your encounters with Hann Redwin? I'm writing an article for The Times about him now that he has been found alive and well.
Jack Malvern - 020 7782 5049

Dan Gerous
4th Jun 2018, 19:40
A joke going around edinburgh at the time.

Jeremy Thorpe was seen in Leith harbour last night. He was half way up a buoy.

NutLoose
4th Jun 2018, 20:39
Jeremy Thorpe has left us

through the back door?

VP959
4th Jun 2018, 22:08
RichJP,
Would you be happy to speak to me about your encounters with Hann Redwin? I'm writing an article for The Times about him now that he has been found alive and well.
Jack Malvern - 020 7782 5049

If this is the same Hann Redwin that lived in West London, and had a workshop where he was building a kit aircraft, then he approached me to do some technical work for him around 12 to 15 years ago, related to certification, I think via the PFA. IIRC, he lived somewhere not far from the Hammersmith flyover, or at least had a workshop there.

I was wholly unaware of any connection the Thorpe, until reading this thread just now. My dealings with him were limited, and he was a bit odd, but I may well have some of the papers he sent me at that time, if it's the same person.

Tankertrashnav
4th Jun 2018, 23:49
I had almost forgotten I had listened to Tom Mangold's programme on the radio four years ago, but I saw the TV version a couple of nights ago. A couple of things struck me - how did the judge get away with such a biased summing up? Could a mistrial have been called on account of his obvious bias? Not sure of the legal procedure - could the prosecution not have appealed against the verdict on those grounds? The other thing was how the establishment closed ranks around one of their own. It must have been obvious to many in parliament as well as the security services that Thorpe was buggering anyone he could get his mitts on, so that Scott's story must at least have been credible. Why did they all rally round?

WilliumMate
4th Jun 2018, 23:55
Norman Scott bites yer dog, Jeremy Thorpe bites yer pillow...........or was it the other way round

Bit of a late amendment but I think it was:

Norman Hunter bites yer legs, Norman Scott bites yer pillow.

SpringHeeledJack
5th Jun 2018, 08:38
You would hear 'cockneys' referring to men who liked men as 'pillow biters' back in the day. Btw, I thought that the actors who portrayed the protagonists in the dramatisation did a brilliant job.

Krystal n chips
5th Jun 2018, 09:31
If this is the same Hann Redwin that lived in West London, and had a workshop where he was building a kit aircraft, then he approached me to do some technical work for him around 12 to 15 years ago, related to certification, I think via the PFA. IIRC, he lived somewhere not far from the Hammersmith flyover, or at least had a workshop there.

I was wholly unaware of any connection the Thorpe, until reading this thread just now. My dealings with him were limited, and he was a bit odd, but I may well have some of the papers he sent me at that time, if it's the same person.

How time flies.........spot the difference from 4 years previously. It would be interesting to learn more about the airworthiness involvement with the PFA however.

"By a very bizarre coincidence, I ended up doing some work for Hann Redwin around 10 years ago. He was living in West London and was interested in an aircraft kit, and sought some advice on getting it through airworthiness approval. I had absolutely no idea he was in any way connected with the Thorpe affair at all, but do remember thinking that he was a bit eccentric. Somewhere I still have a file about his proposed project, but I never actually met him, I only spoke to him on the phone a few times and exchanged a few letters. I do remember he kept trying to persuade me to have a meeting with him in London, but I couldn't spare the time. I didn't hear any more from him and having just Googled his name I now know why; he died in 2005, not that long after our last exchange of correspondence "

The C4 interview with David Steele was " interesting" to say the least. As was the acquittal at the time. .

RedhillPhil
5th Jun 2018, 14:10
Always worth having a peek at the judge's summing up - well, not quite but if the disguise was any thinner........

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kyos-M48B8U

GANNET FAN
5th Jun 2018, 16:48
I promise you this is absolutely true.

At the time of the trial, driving to work in the Parliament Square area, on the back of a dirty van in front of me, finger scrawled the following.

"Widen the circle of your friends, join the Liberal Party"

Still makes me laugh even after all this time.

VP959
5th Jun 2018, 18:44
Having only watched the Panorama documentary that was shown the other evening, and not having paid a lot of attention to the case at the time, I have to say that I was a bit taken aback by what seemed to be a pretty clear case of corruption at the highest level, in order to seemingly cover up what Thorpe had allegedly been up to.

What puzzled me was why the government of the day chose to side with Thorpe, a party leader who had dragged the Liberal party back from virtual obscurity. What seemed even more surprising was that Harold Wilson was involved, as my recollections of Wilson are that he was very much a down to earth, beer and sandwiches man.

UniFoxOs
5th Jun 2018, 18:58
my recollections of Wilson are that he was very much a down to earth, beer and sandwiches man.

Well it was the impression he liked to give.

VP959
5th Jun 2018, 19:12
Well it was the impression he liked to give.

I may well be too young to remember his earlier days in politics, but my then future wife and I bumped into him and his wife whilst we were on a short holiday, walking around St Marys, not long before we got married, and he seemed to me to be a pretty down to earth person. I didn't recognise him at first, and it was only after chatting whilst walking that the penny dropped as to who he was.

PLovett
6th Jun 2018, 06:02
I had almost forgotten I had listened to Tom Mangold's programme on the radio four years ago, but I saw the TV version a couple of nights ago. A couple of things struck me - how did the judge get away with such a biased summing up? Could a mistrial have been called on account of his obvious bias? Not sure of the legal procedure - could the prosecution not have appealed against the verdict on those grounds? The other thing was how the establishment closed ranks around one of their own. It must have been obvious to many in parliament as well as the security services that Thorpe was buggering anyone he could get his mitts on, so that Scott's story must at least have been credible. Why did they all rally round?

Judges have been doing biased summing ups for decades if not centuries. There is in the Old Bailey a plaque commemorating the actions of a jury who ignored a judge's direction to convict. They themselves were locked up on bread and water by the judge until finally a superior court told the judge to wind his head in. In a jury trial the only people who can find the facts of the case are the jury; a judge can point to the evidence as it applies to the law but cannot make any finding of fact. The only grounds a prosecution would have was if they felt the judge had made a mistake in law. It always surprises me that no-one seems to complain when a judge gives a biased summation against a defendant. There is most definitely a double standard at work there.:hmm:

flash8
7th Jun 2018, 00:24
Couldn't unfortunately see it.

Did it have that classic line he used when first accosted after arrest by the by the press, where he stated "no comment"....

Anytime after that whenever he was asked for a comment he simply replied "Ditto"...

I think I read this in some biography of him some years back, always thought that highly amusing.