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View Full Version : I had a ride in this today..


John Hill
3rd Dec 2014, 01:18
http://www.gyrate.co.nz/images/gallery%20-%20about%20gyroplanes/P1140533.JPG

Super little machine! Maybe I should buy one!

arcniz
3rd Dec 2014, 01:40
Where can I get a 6-pax version of that?

pigboat
3rd Dec 2014, 01:45
You're a braver man than I am, Gunga John. :ooh:

John Hill
3rd Dec 2014, 02:45
It is of course very slow (80 knots cruise I think) but it turns in its own length, or at least gives that impression, and the landing roll is just a few metres.

galaxy flyer
3rd Dec 2014, 02:52
very slow (80 knots cruise I think)

Just barely fast enough to kill ya, John

rh200
3rd Dec 2014, 02:57
You and the little fat one in NK will go well together.

John Hill
3rd Dec 2014, 03:41
rh200, I think I will pop you in the box with the others..:rolleyes:

glendalegoon
3rd Dec 2014, 03:54
reminds me of little nellie


anyway, if you want to see a real autogyro, watch the film, "It happened one night", the last 15 minutes or so you see a real autogyro...well filmed, circa 1934.

rh200
3rd Dec 2014, 04:29
rh200, I think I will pop you in the box with the others..:rolleyes:

Oh come on, it was just begging to be said:p

RJM
3rd Dec 2014, 04:33
Technical Specifications of the Calidus:

Length 4,8 m, Width 1,7 m and Height 2,7 m
Rotor diameter 8.4 m
Cruising speed: 90kt
Maximum speed: 100kt
Motor: Rotax 912 ULS (100hp) or Rotax 914 ULT Turbo (115hp), both motors use the 1:2.43 reduction gearbox.
Calidus 912

Tandem Enclosed

From $100,000 GST inc fly away

sitigeltfel
3rd Dec 2014, 05:02
You and the little fat one in NK will go well together.

Do the weight limitations allow for that?

TWT
3rd Dec 2014, 05:51
What was your impression of it John ?

John Hill
3rd Dec 2014, 07:10
TWT, I was frankly very impressed. It is no speed ship but it is, in a sense, very nimble. A fairly short take off run as it has a pre rotator system driven by the engine, I was told that a premature climb out is not good so although the aircraft was airborne soon enough we continued on to use more of the runway at very low level while rotor and airspeed increased further into their green zone.

Once in the air everything seemed normal enough except the turns appeared to be of a very tight radius


The rate of climb is not great and the pilot indicated that more power would be nice. Of course the 80 knot cruise at 500' gives plenty of scope for checking out who has what in their back yard!

We flew near the local meat works where we know there is always rough air but instead of the usual bumps and creaks we just experienced a bit more 'pendulum action'.

Returning to the un controlled airfield was interesting. A light fixed wing was down wind 1500' while we were still some distance to the field. The pilot in command called we would be joining overhead for landing number one, which I thought was a bit cheeky but as soon as we crossed the runway centreline he turned downwind (500' or so) while the fixed wing was turning base leg. Then we did another quick turn followed almost immediately by yet another turn onto final and a very steep descent and a flare when the grass came into focus, the wheels touched and we rolled to a halt in just a few yards. The fixed wing was a mile behind us as we taxied to our parking place.

It was interesting to learn the principles of operation and the 'must not do' list was very short (no stick hard forward for example) while on the ground care must be taken that forces residing in the spinning down rotor disk are not invited to tip the craft over or impact the rotor blades on the tail feathers.

All in all an excellent little fun machine but I suspect one's enjoyment of such a craft might depend somewhat on the local regulatory environment as applicable to such aircraft, we seem fortunate here in that regard.

mikedreamer787
3rd Dec 2014, 07:20
You look younger than your 67 years
in that photo Mr Hill. So what's your
secret?

The NZ water or women or sheep? ;)

bcgallacher
3rd Dec 2014, 07:24
Most autogiros look like a motley collection of parts bolted together - this looks like something that has had a lot of thought and good engineering input. I hope the company prospers.

John Hill
3rd Dec 2014, 07:34
Yes, it does appear to be carefully made with all purpose made parts, no power boat controls or motor cycle throttle levers in sight! No creaks and groans from the fuselage when taxiing and a perfect air tight seal around the canopy.

German makers I believe.

UniFoxOs
3rd Dec 2014, 08:40
Most autogiros look like a motley collection of parts bolted together - this looks like something that has had a lot of thought and good engineering input. I hope the company prospers.

Certainly does, but I can't help thinking that the boom looks a bit weird having to curve so much to allow room for the pusher, and a front prop would have allowed a tidier straight boom. Presumably there's some over-riding design reason why most autogyros are designed with a pusher.

chuks
3rd Dec 2014, 08:47
John, with a Calidus in the back of your ute, you will be the center of attention, yes. "'Silver Bat,' meet 'Maroon Monstrosity.' We fly at dawn! Awaaay!"

Too, I am sure that the North Korean Air Force is still looking for a few good men.

I have a friend who flies an autogyro here in Germany. He asked me if I wanted to come along for a ride, but I find that I need to sort out my sock drawer first. The damned thing just looks so insubstantial, somehow, very much like a Robbie, a/k/a "the lawn dart."

With the autogyro's engine at the back, it's protected in the case of a crash, just as with the famous Beetle. What happens to the occupants, well ....

Fliegenmong
3rd Dec 2014, 08:51
I was lead to believe by a Senior Check and Training Captain that such contraptions were prone to PIO and could lead to the rotor severing the tail....:\

But then again he knew ALL about the venerable Boeing 3 hole T Tail, perhaps not so much about Autogiros....

....100k is a sh!tbinload of money! :eek:

I16
3rd Dec 2014, 09:33
Yep 100k is a lot of aussie dollars - but you may have seen that the price is in NZ dollars and included NZ15% GST and with the current rate of exchange say 9% OZ way, is it better for you?
Here is a nice story from Denmark today -
Denmark world's fourth most prosperous nation - The Local (http://www.thelocal.dk/20141203/denmark-is-worlds-fourth-most-prosperous-nation)

Quizling
3rd Dec 2014, 10:13
Titisee:- Yep. I saw. :\

Fliegenmong
3rd Dec 2014, 10:15
Henry, video does not work here......though that left t!t looks like it's about to slip it's surly bonds :}:}

TWT
3rd Dec 2014, 10:33
Watch it on YouTube,works fine.

A very nice video !

Checkboard
3rd Dec 2014, 12:37
Of course the 80 knot cruise at 500' gives plenty of scope for checking out who has what in their back yard!

... except that Civil Aviation Regulations 1988 require aircraft to maintain a minimum height of 1,000 feet above ground level (AGL) over built up areas. ;)

Blacksheep
3rd Dec 2014, 13:26
AH! An autogyro!

Here's one we made earlier . . .

http://www.powell-pressburger.org/Reviews/Images/G-ABLM02.jpg



A deHavilland/Cierva joint venture that came to nothing for commercial reasons.

We keep it in a corner of the hangar at London Colney. It really belongs to the Science Museum, but they're too ashamed of it to put it on display in Kensington.

Haraka
3rd Dec 2014, 14:11
The Wallis Wa-116 had a glass fibre nacelle built up from over a Hunter drop tank.
On occasion we flew with the nacelle off. It was somewhat akin to flying like a witch on a broomstick.
Once at 3000ft in this configuration I must confess I felt a bit uncomfortable and descended to around 1000 ft where the terrain gave more of a 3D view : totally irrationally, it felt "safer".
Having watched John Judge go in at Farnborough in 1970 from less than that height in a similar machine, I was under no illusions as to just how irrational that sensation was.

west lakes
3rd Dec 2014, 14:20
We have a training school/club etc based at an airfield close by so seeing various types in the air is commen

A lot of the work is done on MT03 Autogyros AutoGyro MT-03 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AutoGyro_MT-03)

which are great fun and very manouverable.

The club, I'm told, does regular trips around the UK

joy ride
3rd Dec 2014, 15:10
Always liked Autogyros and that one does look high quality. Would love a flight in one, but still feel the open air skeletal are best for thrills.

pigboat
3rd Dec 2014, 15:14
The young lady's Titzlinger appears to have bailed out.

John Hill
3rd Dec 2014, 17:28
Checkboard, no one in town has anything interesting in their back yard, besides, in NZ no flying of this class of craft over 'built up areas'.

I16, 100 kilobux is indeed a significant amount of money but in reality is only 'n' pension payments.

Boudreaux Bob
3rd Dec 2014, 17:34
I suggest this thread be moved to the "I lost my Brains" thread.:E

John Hill
3rd Dec 2014, 17:55
The owner of this particular Calidus uses it to commute, ten minutes or so.

con-pilot
3rd Dec 2014, 18:07
Yes, it does appear to be carefully made with all purpose made parts, no power boat controls or motor cycle throttle levers in sight! No creaks and groans from the fuselage when taxiing and a perfect air tight seal around the canopy.

German makers I believe.

It appears to built to much higher standards that the auto-gyros that I was familiar with back in the late 60s and early 70s. I had some friends that had kit built auto-gyros back then. There were a three auto-gyros, one guy owned one and another owned two. The guy that owned two, first one he had crashed when parts of it started to fall off on it while he was flying it, he managed to land it a wheat field, he received minor injuries, but the auto-gyro was a complete write off.

Undaunted he ordered another kit, but this time hired a mechanic (engineer) to assemble it for him, rather than build it himself as he did the first one. As it turned out, that didnít make much difference, it fell apart as well in flight, this time he was seriously injured and decided to get out of the auto-gyro hobby activity.

With the guy that owned just one, it fell apart as he was taxing in. Once was enough for him.

Glad you had a good time, but be careful in those things, I still donít trust them.

pigboat
3rd Dec 2014, 19:53
Con what was the name of those things back then, Benson or something? A guy up here built one, he was the chief engineer of a corporate flight department and known for his strict maintenance practices. For whatever reason, he removed the bracing wire between the rotor mast and the front of the keel and flew it that way for awhile. One day he was cruising along and the rotor mast folded backward with predictable results.

con-pilot
3rd Dec 2014, 19:57
Con what was the name of those things back then, Benson or something?

That sounds right, they came in a kit and one put the parts together, then good luck.

Yup, looked it up;

Bensen B-8 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bensen_B-8)

Sadly, this is how many of them ended up.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oA3t_RsIZ_A

gooneydog
3rd Dec 2014, 20:01
Saw a guy kill himself in something similar some years back at Centerville TN

Flash2001
3rd Dec 2014, 21:06
Yeah

These were advertised as kits in Popular Mechanics, Popular Science etc. The ads suggested that you could teach yourself to fly it.

After an excellent landing you can still use the autogyro...

John Hill
3rd Dec 2014, 21:35
I am sure the ads for the Bede BD-5 inferred the same thing! As too did the promotions relating to the Pou du Ciel.

RedhillPhil
3rd Dec 2014, 22:41
And when it all goes wrong............


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZOd2PnR_YUU&feature=player_detailpage#t=1

John Hill
3rd Dec 2014, 23:16
Yea, always a bad idea to operate machinery you do not understand.

Exascot
4th Dec 2014, 08:25
Yea, always a bad idea to operate machinery you do not understand.

Did it for decades, as long as no one down the back is aware it's fine :E

Blacksheep
4th Dec 2014, 12:22
The ads suggested that you could teach yourself to fly itWell, it worked for Orville and Wilbur didn't it?

chuks
4th Dec 2014, 13:39
I had a couple of fellows try to sell me a partially completed BD-5 around 1975. I had been reading about this wonderful new aircraft that you could put together out in your garage, and sure enough, there it was in a garage and it looked rather nifty, too. But ... where was the engine?

"Oh, that .... "

Yes, well, Mr Bede was working on that detail, and an engine was sure to be coming along any time soon, no problem. That sounded like "The check is in the mail," to me so that I passed on the BD-5.

Some years later we met this fellow who was attempting a coast-to-coast flight in a primitive ultralight, a thing with a Rogallo wing, weight-shift control, and what seemed to be a lawn-mower engine, one with a dead man switch one held clenched in one's teeth. (So, what happens if you sneeze?) We were holding for take-off at Grand Strand one windy day in our Twin Otter watching this optimist attempt to depart. He did two or three runs that all ended with a violent swerve into the bushes accompanied by angry buzzing noises from the engine. Then they made him quit for a little while, clearing us to depart, and when we came back he was gone. I have no idea if he made it to Kitty Hawk or not ....

My wife has a friend who had a boyfriend who had a school, teaching people how to fly para-wings from mountain meadows near Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany. (That's in the Black Forest region, where the cuckoo clocks are made.) One day when we were visiting them, the boyfriend took me along on a training session. He strapped me into the harness, showed me how to lay the para-wing out behind me, showed me what to hold and how to pull the control toggles, and then told me to run downhill. So I did, when the damned thing inflated and lifted me off the ground. Amazing!

I spent a while playing with the thing while he showed his newbies how to do the same thing. Flights were no problem, except that I kept forgetting that there were no wheels, that I had to use my feet like a parachutist for landing.

When we were putting the stuff away down at the bottom of the hill later, though, the boyfriend pointed out this large, angry-looking tangle of shrubbery, rhododendron or something like that, all by itself in a thinly-grassed, rocky area. "I landed in that," he told me, "and it saved my life."

"My God! What happened?"

"I was flying my high-performance para-wing when one side collapsed in a gust so that it went into an unrecoverable spin. I just happened to land in that shrubbery and it broke my fall; otherwise I probably would have died."

"So what went wrong?"

"Oh, those high-performance ones ... they do that sometimes .... "

con-pilot
4th Dec 2014, 17:57
He strapped me into the harness, showed me how to lay the para-wing out behind me, showed me what to hold and how to pull the control toggles, and then told me to run downhill. So I did, when the damned thing inflated and lifted me off the ground. Amazing!


You're a braver man than I Sir Chuks. :uhoh:

John Hill
4th Dec 2014, 19:18
....showed me how to lay the para-wing out behind me...

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7402/9581768248_e283369c02.jpg

Getting read to go on camel patrol!

con-pilot
4th Dec 2014, 19:50
Sorry, but I want a proper cockpit surrounding me when I fly. Not a lawn chair with some wheels attached to it.

Open cockpit biplanes excluded from the above of course. :ok:

John Hill
4th Dec 2014, 22:35
If you want to patrol for feral camels on the West Island you want something that flies low and slow, has good visibility and is cost effective for the job in hand.

con-pilot
4th Dec 2014, 23:33
If you want to patrol for feral camels on the West Island you want something that flies low and slow, has good visibility and is cost effective for the job in hand.

Well, they say you learn something every day, I had no idea that you had feral camels problems in New Zealand. How on Earth did they get there, some great idea gone bad?

AMarshall
5th Dec 2014, 00:17
If you want to know more about modern gyros check out the German manufacturers of the Calidus, Cavalon and MTO Sport:

AutoGyro - Home (http://www.auto-gyro.com/en)

I fly a Calidus on the South coast of the UK, they are very well built, safe machines and great fun.

Back Pressure
5th Dec 2014, 01:01
Con, he said the West island. The rock in the background gives the game away...

con-pilot
5th Dec 2014, 02:33
Con, he said the West island. The rock in the background gives the game away...


Ah, got it, Australia. Thought that rock look familiar.

Hempy
5th Dec 2014, 03:47
All yours John...nothing but 10,000 moving parts looking for an excuse to fail imo! A solid, fixed lift creating device is at least solid and fixed (except when it's not :ouch:)

I reckon those aerochute things would be fun to muck around in though.

John Hill
5th Dec 2014, 04:08
That Aerochute is no longer in the family!

con-pilot
5th Dec 2014, 17:19
All yours John...nothing but 10,000 moving parts looking for an excuse to fail imo!

Oh, I thought we were talking about gyro choppers and the like, not helicopters. :p

surely not
5th Dec 2014, 20:40
I have been looking at the Magni range of autogyros with a view to learning to fly in one. They have open cockpit tandem style or enclosed side by side options, and all look sleek and sexy. They are nothing like the old style autogyros of yesteryear and have really good performance figures.

I understand that they have just received permission to be operated on a commercial licence in the UK which opens up many possibilities. One (an enclosed cockpit design)has been fitted with a nose camera mount and is going to operate for a power board carrying out power line inspection.

Much safer than a Robbie.

John Hill
6th Dec 2014, 16:46
I understand many of the problems in the operation of the Robbie have been due to malfunctions in the nut holding the stick.:rolleyes: