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JWP1938
28th Nov 2014, 13:40
...I thought I would ask this question for a laugh.
I realise not everybody can be good at spelling/grammar (they can actually with spellcheckers etc.), but why do they put ' in unnecessary places? If taken to task for bad spelling they will say "Oh, I just wrote it quickly." So, instead of saving time when writing plurals like TVs MOTs and so on they take the extra time to press an extra key to insert the damned '. Perhaps I am being too picky but, if I see an online blog or a shop/petrol station and so on, with PROFESSIONALLY produced signage (which I very often do) with this type of spelling then I don't go there. My thoughts are: if you can't be bothered to use a spellchecker to prove your professionalism then I don't think you are worth reading/buying from.
Another rant: Drivers sitting in clearly marked right turn only lanes with their right winker going. If you mention it they say "It doesn't matter does it?" This is true but it shows a lack of attention to what is going on around you and gives (me at least) a lack of confidence in other aspects of their driving.
Tongue in cheek with this post but we all have little things that irritate us. Typos excepted of course. Or accepted if you prefer. :E

CISTRS
28th Nov 2014, 13:46
I don't mind redundant signals. They can often be useful to pedestrians.

Superpilot
28th Nov 2014, 13:51
Redundant signals are the norm in some parts of Europe.

Dushan
28th Nov 2014, 13:55
I am with you, all the way on the apostrophe thing.

Other rage inducing words:
There/their/they're
Your/you're

Also, not double spacing after a period, and not capitalizing proper nouns.

I am sure there will be more coming, as well as defence of the sloppiness.


As for turn indicators. You are turning. Traffic laws say (at least here) that if you are turning you must indicate so. The fact that the lane is turn only may not be visible from far and cars coming behind you know that you will be blocking them if they are going straight.

Capot
28th Nov 2014, 14:02
I'm with you about the abuse of apostrophes, which have an important role in making text clear.

But why does PPRuNe insist on inserting the things where they are not needed as one types out another rant? Is there some semi-literate Californian IT geek at work here?

Is it Microsoft's geek rather than PPRuNe's geek?

Whoever's geek is responsible, why can't he or she learn English?

sidevalve
28th Nov 2014, 14:12
Redundant signals are the norm in some parts of Europe.
Here in France, if you see a car going around a roundabout with his indicator flashing, you're looking at a Frenchman who can't work out why his wipers aren't working..:}

funfly
28th Nov 2014, 14:43
I will comfort you with the following words;

There their

goudie
28th Nov 2014, 14:57
Not signalling right when negotiating a roundabout is most annoying and dangerous, especially when they drive right across your path. Some people then indicate left as they turn ever so slightly left, off the roundabout!:(

Re. the apostrophe. Sainsbury's is sometime missing the apostrophe on my i/net Barclays banking statements. Therefore when checking my spend there I have to enter it twice as the key word, once with the apostrophe and once without, to check my spending therein. I wrote to Barclays 'Customer Care':rolleyes:
about it and no surprises, never received a reply!

We have Friday Jokes
What about Friday Rants? Clear all the crap out out of the way prior to the w/e.
I feel better already:)

jolihokistix
28th Nov 2014, 15:00
Not wishing to stray too far off track, but there is of course a legitimate difference between the 1990s and the 1990's.

Where/were/we're gets to me too. Also definately drives me up the wall, oh, and could of.

Hobo
28th Nov 2014, 15:08
seperately - definately!

27mm
28th Nov 2014, 15:18
Similar TO
Different FROM

ChickenHouse
28th Nov 2014, 15:25
I fear the greengrocer's apostrophe is conquering the world ...

seafire6b
28th Nov 2014, 16:16
I fear the greengrocer's apostrophe is conquering the world ... Why, oh why, do people randomly stick an apostrophe in, just because the word's a plural? Even then, they're seldom consistent, e.g. "grapes, pears, apple's, bananas ..." etc.

My local fish & chippery sell take-aways downstairs, but also have a dining room on the upper floor. Hence the "professionally" painted sign, complete with an arrow, directing "Diner's Upstairs". The sign-writer obviously just couldn't resist the temptation to whack an apostrophe in. He (she?) might even have got away with "Diners' Upstairs", but alas, it wasn't to be.

Then there was the pub I knew many years back, where patrons were offered the chance to barbeque their own meals. There was a large "professional" sign at the entrance to the beer garden, emblazoned with the words, "Your the Chef"!

Similarly (I've got the bit between my teeth now!), I had cause to use a local large accountancy firm, whose website homepage included the phrase, "... to ensure our client's needs are fulfilled and expectations exceeded".
My comment that they thus appeared to have only one client just went way over their heads...


Accordingly I'm happy to have now enlisted with the Apostrophe Police - our members are so much more refined than the Grammar Nazis:

Grammar concentration camp - Uncyclopedia, the content-free encyclopedia (http://uncyclopedia.wikia.com/wiki/Grammar_concentration_camp)

Incidentally, that's not Godwin's Law is it? Whoops.

airship
28th Nov 2014, 16:27
To be Frank, I don't think I really know when to properly use an "'" or even a double """ around a phrase or whatever. It must be over 40 years ago that I last had an English lesson back in the early '70s. With regard to spelling, after spending over 23 years in France, I'm often confused by English / French spelling of similar words eg. address and adresse. It's not very professional to use professionnel but I like to think such small mistakes add a touch of 'je ne sais quoi?' to the reader believing I'm a French English-speaker as opposed to an English English-speaker or even an English French-speaker.

PS. It's very brave of Capot to write: Is there some semi-literate Californian IT geek at work here? when mentionning the IT folks behind this wonderful website. Even substituting the phrase with "semi-illiterate Californian" won't save you now... :E

PPS. It's my birthday today, so I'm excused everything . :ok:

ShyTorque
28th Nov 2014, 16:27
Somebody cud of told me about this thread before. Ive got complaint's to make.

sidevalve
28th Nov 2014, 16:28
Then there's mischevious.. and air bourne..
Plus those who can't spell RAF bases, such as Conningsby, Gibralter etc.
"Friday Rant" thread is a good idea - better than shouting at the traffic..

Dushan
28th Nov 2014, 16:32
My local fish & chippery sell take-aways downstairs, but also have a dining room on the upper floor. Hence the "professionally" painted sign, complete with an arrow, directing "Diner's Upstairs". The sign-writer obviously just couldn't resist the temptation to whack an apostrophe in. He (she?) might even have got away with "Diners' Upstairs", but alas, it wasn't to be.




At least it wasn't "Diner's Upstair's"

Miserlou
28th Nov 2014, 17:03
"Diner's upstairs"

The diner IS upstairs.
Rather casual way of pointing it out though.

Tankertrashnav
28th Nov 2014, 17:08
Also, not double spacing after a period, and not capitalizing proper nouns.


Just as annoying is the Practice of randomly capitalising common Nouns :*

(btw capitalizing/capitalising - both spellings are acceptable, before somebody jumps in!).

Capot
28th Nov 2014, 17:15
It's very brave of Capot to write:Yes, well, the same thought occurred to me, so I hastily added:

Is it Microsoft's geek rather than PPRuNe's geek?to obfuscate it a little.

Shaggy Sheep Driver
28th Nov 2014, 17:15
There's no excuse for apostrophe abuse; It's dead easy to get it right and when it's wrong it stands out and shouts "WRONG"!

Regarding indicators, far more annoying are those who stop at the lights in the RH lane which is 'straight ahead' or 'turn right', not indicating. So you, going straight on and assuming they are since they are not indicating, run up behind them. When the lights change to green, they indicate right! Grrrrrr!

Smudger
28th Nov 2014, 18:02
Remember... They're (apostrophe replacing the "a" in "they are" which takes longer to articulate) going to their (possessive) house over there !

They're going to their house over there.

Job done not rocket science is it people.

Now.. where's that butt plug...

Keef
28th Nov 2014, 18:19
...patrons were offered the chance to barbeque their own meals.

Is that "barbecue", or "bar-B-Q"? (I can't reproduce "BQ with a bar over the top").

"Barbeque" it isn't: that would be pronounced "barbeck" if the word existed (which it doesn't).

15-all?

seafire6b
28th Nov 2014, 18:51
Keef

15-all? Agreed, point conceded - my "fault" (sorry!) for thinking "BBQ", whilst attempting to type barbecue.

In mitigation, I did a pre-check (Wiki: "Barbecue, also barbeque, BBQ and barby/barbies"), yet failed, because I didn't type what I intended. But perhaps by leave of Wiki, I nevertheless retain the point?
Although now I know why no-one shows up for my summertime barbecks!


.

Dushan
28th Nov 2014, 19:46
Regarding indicators, far more annoying are those who stop at the lights in the RH lane which is 'straight ahead' or 'turn right', not indicating. So you, going straight on and assuming they are since they are not indicating, run up behind them. When the lights change to green, they indicate right! Grrrrrr!

That's what a 20mm gun mounted on the hood is for.

Dushan
28th Nov 2014, 19:54
However, I'm assured that today it supposedly indicates some clever form of plural possessive "its" - to which I say "Eh? A plural 'its'? Isn't that 'their'?"




Which reminds me of another one: "supposably".

Andu
28th Nov 2014, 20:03
The increasing, (getting to be almost universal), use of adjective 'loose' when the word required in the sentence in question is the verb 'lose'.

Arrrrggghhh!.

On this pedant's apostrophe police scale, it's almost up there with the misuse of "its/its'/it's'".

It's (with apostrophe; a contraction of "it is") versus "its" (without apostrophe; indicates the possessive; the exception that proves the rule - the one word in the English language where the apostrophe does not indicate the possessive) versus "its'" (when I studied English, a meaningless use of the apostrophe). However, I'm assured that today it supposedly indicates some clever form of plural possessive "its" - to which I say "Eh? A plural 'its'? Isn't that 'their'?"

Then there's 'than me', where the correct useage is 'than I', which today sounds impossibly, ridiculously pretentious. However, one can rescue it in most instances by adding the usually understood but omitted 'am' after the 'I' and perhaps avoid sounding like a complete prat.

Gosh, looking back at that rant, some here might wonder what my post would look like were I to get really upset and "loose" my temper.

Edited to add: since the whole point of this thread is to stroke our own inner pedant, Dushan, that's a seriously small caliber weapon you have on your dashboard. A .20mm cannon? It must be a proper bastard to clean and reload. :) That's another pet hate seen or heard too often in today's media - "a 9mm caliber pistol or a "50mm caliber cannon".

Dushan
28th Nov 2014, 20:05
Continuing the pedant mode, I did say "That's what a .20mm gun mounted on the hood is for."

Edited to add, Yes I see what you mean:ugh::ugh::ugh::ugh:

Hydromet
28th Nov 2014, 20:30
...which today sounds impossibly, ridiculously pretentious. Not to me.

"That's what a .20mm gun mounted on the hood is for."That would be a needle gun, then?

Apart from the misuse of apostrophes, their/there/there and lack of capitals on proper nouns, I'm irked by the interchanging of loose/lose and the pretentious misuse of "whom" when "who" is correct.

Edited to add "...and the repeating of points made in previous posts." Sorry, Andu.

fujii
28th Nov 2014, 20:43
The PPrune ATC forum invites you to enter the Lions den.

Dushan
28th Nov 2014, 20:47
Or would that be "Lion's"

G-CPTN
28th Nov 2014, 20:51
I don't think I really know when to properly use an "'" or even a double """ around a phrase or whatever.
I've always reserved the doubles for actual quoted speech, with singles for 'examples' - which would make your "'" ''' and your """ '"' . . .

6bpIbdZhrzA

Gibon2
28th Nov 2014, 21:13
Also, not double spacing after a period, and not capitalizing proper nouns.

You should never, ever type two spaces after a period, full stop.

Two spaces after a period: Why you should never, ever do it. (http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/technology/2011/01/space_invaders.html)

From the article:

Can I let you in on a secret? Typing two spaces after a period is totally, completely, utterly, and inarguably wrong.
And yet people who use two spaces are everywhere, their ugly error crossing every social boundary of class, education, and taste.

rh200
28th Nov 2014, 21:44
As a paid up member of being in the "victims of the apostrophe police" club, I must point out a few things in our defense.

All sorts have been abusing the Queens English, for yonks. That said its the age of the huggy fluffy, and along those lines I call multi cultural English. We should be more understanding of peoples writing skills and interpretation of said.

funfly
28th Nov 2014, 21:57
The lions den is where the lions live.
The lion's den is the property of a single lion.
FF

Dushan
28th Nov 2014, 21:58
That said its the age of the huggy fluffy, and along those lines I call multi cultural English.

When I challenged my kids' teacher, about 30 years ago, on why she didn't correct their spelling and grammar, I was told that she is more interested in their artistic ability and imagination and not the tool with which to express it:ugh::ugh::ugh:

Capetonian
28th Nov 2014, 22:04
The lions den is where the lions live.
The lion's den is the property of a single lion.
The lions' den would be the property of more than one lion but could arguably be the place where they live.

A scammer recently sent me some fake 'unpaid hotel bills' with a threatening letter demanding payment.
The hotels included :
The Holiday's Inns
The Days' Inn

tow1709
28th Nov 2014, 22:16
I was told that you should put two spaces after a full stop if you were using a justified right margin, but one space if using a ragged right margin. Or was it the other way round?

Sallyann1234
28th Nov 2014, 22:27
I always use two spaces after a full stop, and ignore any criticism of the practice. I find that it makes the text easier on the eye, particularly in a large paragraph.

ChocksAwayChaps
28th Nov 2014, 23:44
The hood? Do you mean the bonnet, old chap?

Shaggy Sheep Driver
29th Nov 2014, 00:20
All sorts have been abusing the Queens English, for yonks. That said its the age of the huggy fluffy, and along those lines I call multi cultural English. We should be more understanding of peoples writing skills and interpretation of said.

So that'd be "Queen's", "it's", "people's", then.

Normally I'd say what matters is communicating one's meaning accurately when writing English. That means getting punctuation right! It's far more important than spelling, as only grossly miss-spelled words change the meaning whereas even moderate punctuation abuse can completely change the meaning of a piece of writing.

However, in the case of the paragraph quoted, even with the punctuation corrected I could not understand what it was trying to say.

Some teachers, it seems, have a great deal to answer for in failing to inculcate basic skills in written english into their charges. I could relate a story that directly supports that view, and might if this thread goes on much longer!

jolihokistix
29th Nov 2014, 01:51
Just had to look up misspelled and misspelt, but couldn't believe the answer given.

Stanwell
29th Nov 2014, 02:57
The wombat..
Eats roots shoots and leaves.

Flying Lawyer
29th Nov 2014, 03:20
Shaggy Sheep Driver

Normally I'd say what matters is communicating one's meaning accurately when writing English.

If you had said "what matters most", I would have agreed with you.

Did you intentionally write "miss-spelled" in order to illustrate that a grossly misspelled word does not necessarily change the meaning of a sentence? ;)


(I realise that "english" in your final paragraph was a typing error.)

Ken Borough
29th Nov 2014, 05:02
Down here in Oz, those who abuse the apostrophe are often referred to as 'The Apostrophe Man". He drives a lot of us as mad as hell.

On another track, use of the term 'train station' instead of 'railway station' drives me mad. Whatever happened to the use of correct English as it's supposed to be used? Globalisation, Americanisation or simply poor education?

ExSp33db1rd
29th Nov 2014, 06:40
Andu - loose and lose, totally agree, shoot the barstewards.

Spoken rather than written .... in New Zealand almost all those on TV or radio, may talk of something that is going to affect all womAn. Where have all the womEn gone ?

Happens all the time, Mrs. ExS is getting fed up with me screaming at the TV - womEn, you moron.

Ken Borough
29th Nov 2014, 06:56
Orright! Here's something for the grammarians in our midst:

]Johnson: Grammar versus meaning: Green Bay win again | The Economist (http://www.economist.com/blogs/prospero/2014/11/johnson-grammar-versus-meaning/FONT)

Capetonian
29th Nov 2014, 07:03
I was reading an article about Josip Tito's secret bunker in Serbia and one of the photos is captioned :

According to the news agency AP the entrance lies behind a nondescript garage door of a remote house at the end of a lonely road, dug into the mountain's behind the house

Tito's top secret bunker in Bosnia is a time capsule back to 1950s Yugoslavia - Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/picturegalleries/worldnews/11258143/Titos-top-secret-bunker-in-Bosnia-is-a-time-capsule-back-to-1950s-Yugoslavia.html?frame=3120116)

Stanwell
29th Nov 2014, 07:18
Has anybody tried to decipher 'yr right's' posts?
When queried about it by other readers of a thread, his response is along the lines of ... 'I really don't give a rat's arse!'
This guy claims to be a LAME (A&P to you Yanks).

Bull at a Gate
29th Nov 2014, 07:29
There are some occupations where correct use of the apostrophe is extremely uncommon. Ironically, in view of the oft used term "apostrophe police", I find that one such occupation is that of a police officer. There are more of course, green grocers and, from what I read on pprune, airline pilots among them. (Prepares for literate airline pilots to argue that I have misused the word "ironically" or should have used an "Oxford comma", or that my use of a double space after the full stop demonstrates that I am a complete moron)

Stanwell
29th Nov 2014, 07:38
Umm, can we have that again? (in English, please).

Capetonian
29th Nov 2014, 07:47
Something that troubles many people is the use of the apostrophe with plural nouns. It used to trouble me until one day walking round Rondebosch Common I realised that there it was, in front of me, the correct use, and I keep the image in my head whenever I have to use a plural noun.
http://www.quantumfire.co.za/images/clients/5.jpg

probes
29th Nov 2014, 08:03
We have Friday Jokes
What about Friday Rants? Clear all the crap out out of the way prior to the w/e.
Let's not ruin the Fridays.

Could be Round-the-clock Rants? Well, Goudie? :cool:

Ken, relax. There are new people coming of age (of literacy) who do not know what happened before. They can't help it. :8

Shaggy Sheep Driver
29th Nov 2014, 10:41
Train station - I agree, yuch! Where did that come from?

It's the railway that's 'stationed' there, not the trains.

probes
29th Nov 2014, 10:44
but a bit of the railway is stationed elsewhere, too? :E

Shaggy Sheep Driver
29th Nov 2014, 10:47
As are the trains.

Capetonian
29th Nov 2014, 11:20
I am not in favour of USAmericanisms in fact I abhor them.

However, the train station is where the train stops.
The bus station is where the bus stops.
The taxi station is where the taxi stops.

The railway is not something that moves, the train moves, so train station is technically correct, just sounds awful.

A few weeks ago in Chester a USAmerican couple approached me and asked me if I knew the way to the train station. I said : "I can show you the way to the railway station." They seemed a little perplexed, understandably, and having engaged in some banter, I walked them to the railway station where, as they had plenty of time before their train, they kindly bought me tea and a cake.

Lord Spandex Masher
29th Nov 2014, 11:30
Airport should be 'plane station. Or train station should be track port. Init.

olympus
29th Nov 2014, 14:10
I read a lot, military history mostly and I have come to realise that many publishers of said histories don't employ proof-readers.

One solecism that I have noticed several times recently is the use of 'lead' when 'led' would be more appropriate eg '...he lead his troops into battle...'

Pen & Sword Publishers are one of a number of offenders here; errors of fact often creep into their offerings and are not spotted-understandably with a non-expert editor but common errors of grammar and punctuation are inexcusable.

Shaggy Sheep Driver
29th Nov 2014, 14:24
There's a small development of houses near here on a road called "Fawns Keep". If I go there with my paint pot, should I insert the missing apostrophe (if that was what those who named the road intended)? Or complete the sentence:

"Fawns Keep for quite a long time if you deep freeze them".

foresight
29th Nov 2014, 14:40
Train station or railway station?
What's wrong with just 'station'? The word needs no further description.

The other one that gets to me is 'horse riding'. I don't know when that one started, but if I'm going riding, I'm going to ride a horse. If I'm going to ride a pig, bike or anything else, I will then make it plain.

RedhillPhil
29th Nov 2014, 15:02
It's rather like a nosebleed. People get a nosebleed. They don't get a finger bleed or a leg bleed but how or why is it a nose bleed rather than a bleeding nose?


Apostrophes. The very best one that I'm aware of is in Lancing where a small eatery has the word caf'e proudly displayed above the entrance.

Shaggy Sheep Driver
29th Nov 2014, 17:06
foresight, why should 'riding' only mean 'horse riding' unless otherwise qualified? If I'm going 'riding' it's unlikely to be on a horse. Probably it'll be on one of my motorbikes, or a pushbike.

Capetonian
29th Nov 2014, 17:10
https://farm7.staticflickr.com/6236/6240081973_ebf7cd9b21_m.jpg

I have often wondered if this is a mistake or some kind of 'in joke' or pun. It's in Sunbury on Thames/Feltham.

Shaggy Sheep Driver
29th Nov 2014, 17:20
Northern Ireland Railways are the worst offenders....

Sydenham railway station, Northern Ireland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sydenham_railway_station,_Northern_Ireland#mediaviewer/File:Sydenham_railway_station,_Northern_Ireland_in_2007.jpg)

seafire6b
29th Nov 2014, 18:37
Or horseback riding? (Usually American). Where else, tied to its belly?

G-CPTN
29th Nov 2014, 19:04
We have a Princes Street - which some people (ie the regional council) refer to as Princess Street.

Mr Optimistic
29th Nov 2014, 19:28
And when did films become movies?

Andu
29th Nov 2014, 19:46
Isn't it an (or shouldn't that be 'the'?) accepted convention that the apostrophe is omitted in street and place names?

South of Sydney runs the Princes Highway - although I think they've recently re-named it with a soulless number. I think there's a huge number of Australians who think it's 'The Princess Highway'. (I'm having a wonderful time squeezing in as many apostrophes as possible here.)


Since we're all in collective pedant mode, I'm sure there are some who'd say I should have written "...I think there're a huge number..." So is it singular collective for the (singular) huge number, or plural for the plural "huge numbers" I'm asserting have the spelling wrong? This English language, it's a *** minefield.

The dash connecting two words (or its omission) is another pet hate of mine. There's a very funny email doing the rounds about uncle Joe mounting a horse, (can't find it, or I'd paste it here), where the omission of the dash changes the meaning of the sentence completely.

Mr Optimistic, in Australia, that question would read "And when did films become fillums?"

Mr Optimistic
29th Nov 2014, 19:50
Yeah that would make sense. Isn't. Is not ....

None of the above
29th Nov 2014, 20:03
A local company had its vans professionally sign written in a new style. Unfortunately the apostrophes were replaced with commas.
I've changed the name as I have had the misfortune to cross paths with the unpleasant owner but the error is accurately reproduced.
All the vans were neatly sign written thus:

Armstrong,s

It occurred to me that it might not have been the sign writer at fault, it was probably the owner of the company. Given his yobbish nature, I'd put money on it.

Dushan
29th Nov 2014, 21:04
When stating a quantity of something "six or more". Why not just more than five?

Hydromet
29th Nov 2014, 21:42
"And when did films become fillums?"At about the same time as ceremonies became ceremoanies.

Capot
29th Nov 2014, 22:00
Films became fillums the first time one was shown in Dublin..............

Mr Optimistic
29th Nov 2014, 22:09
And a fine name to adorn any van.

Flying Lawyer
29th Nov 2014, 22:35
AnduIsn't it an (or shouldn't that be 'the'?) accepted convention that the apostrophe is omitted in street and place names?

Our local council is unable to decide.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v146/FlyingLawyer/Misc/kings-road-street-sign-famous-chelsea-32052728-2_zps4e28e062.png.......... http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v146/FlyingLawyer/Misc/Kings-Road-Sign_zpsf25952bd.jpg

mikedreamer787
29th Nov 2014, 22:54
What's this 'on the ground' shit I hear a lot on the media? Who invented that crap?

"We need troops on the ground to fight ISIL".
"Doctors are needed on the ground to contain Ebola".

Well where else do they propose put 'em? Up in the fcuking trees?

Ken Borough
29th Nov 2014, 23:31
Dumbing down, Australian style. This is an extract from a bureacratic tome relating to English usage and geographic names. There's something like 15 pages of guidelines as to the 'consistent use of place names'. Simply forget correct English - just be consistent in its use. What a load of rubbish? Or is it trash?

4.13 Possessive Apostrophe

Since the eighteenth century, the –‘s and –s’ endings have been used on English nouns to show when they were possessive or to express association or affiliation. In place names, these forms are to be written without apostrophes, e.g. Howes Valley, Rushcutters Bay, Ladys Pass. This is to facilitate the consistent use of a single form in each case and to assist in the rapid retrieval of place names from emergency service databases, in the light of variable community usage and uncertainty as to whether the name concerned is singular or plural. The Australian Government Style ManuaI (2002) notes that place names involving possessives are all written without apostrophes, and commends the simplicity of this Australian convention

Andu
29th Nov 2014, 23:34
Oh yes, Hydromet, you've reminded me of one of my favourite hates of late - the way damn near every radio and television 'journalist' and commentator under the age of 35 in Australia has adopted the American pronunciation of 'cereMOANy'. I suspect there's been a directive from GroupThink HQ at 'our' ABC, the 'nash'nul' broadcaster, for they all, even the oldies, seem to have adopted it. It grates, people, really grates - with this old fart at least.

Another is 'fewer/less'.

Less - refers to quantity; fewer - refers to numbers.

So you can have less cash - but fewer, not less dollars.

'Disinterested' is so misused by so many people today it's almost come to be accepted in its incorrect meaning. Disinterested means fair and unbiased; uninterested means couldn't give a toss.

Capot
30th Nov 2014, 00:04
Estate Agent Speak (we've been on their lists for 6 months)...

Stunning = ordinary. Used between 6 and (once) 16 times in every brochure.

Deceptively Spacious = to an English speaker this means "looks spacious, but isn't".

Early Viewing Recommended = said about every property on their books. Why bother?

Easy Access to M5 = has a 100 ft boundary onto the motorway. Nearest junction is 4 miles away. (Yes; that was a bungalow adjacent to the M5.)

Stunning Potential = needs demolition and rebuild.

Stunning Views = can see the tops of some hills from a 1st floor bedroom. (Yes, that was a house in the centre of a suburban estate.)

Stunning Kitchen = kitchen, modernised within last 20 years.

Stunning Bathroom = bathroom with bath.

Stunning Implement = club used on estate agent.

Saltie
30th Nov 2014, 00:10
Billy Joel used the line "Joe is a real estate novelist" in a song years ago. Great line.

Hydromet
30th Nov 2014, 00:30
Ken B, in South Australia in the 70s they attempted to remove not only the apostrophe, but the possessive 's' as well. Hence, Cooper's Creek became Cooper Creek. It's still Cooper's to me.

Takan Inchovit
30th Nov 2014, 00:35
Idontknowwtfeveryoneisworriedabout*Afullstopcombinedwithapos trophesisthebestcompromise*

Caboclo
30th Nov 2014, 01:35
Tip of the day: "Y'all" is singular. The plural is "all y'all".

Y'all're welcome.

Ken Borough
30th Nov 2014, 04:05
Capot,

You may need an interpreter but this sketch has stood the test of time:

John Clark (Fred Dagg) Real Estate - YouTube (http://youtu.be/JbFlstJ4u8E)

Ken Borough
30th Nov 2014, 04:08
Hydro,

That surprises me as South Australians seem to pride themselves on their speech and use of English, especially as they are not descended from those transported to Oz.

Hydromet
30th Nov 2014, 07:06
I think it was just a bureaucratic aberration, Ken, although they do seem to have taken the apostrophe out of their beer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coopers_Brewery).

fujii
30th Nov 2014, 07:28
Re Fawns Keep.

It is convention in place names to not include the apostrophe in place names. Check a map. There was an episode of QI a while back which covered this although there are actually five places in the US which have an apostrophe.

Capetonian
30th Nov 2014, 07:40
In South Africa many nouns are wrongly used as plurals, for example someone will say : "What are you doing for New Years?" which I suppose is a lazy way of saying New Year's Eve, but it grates on me. They also talk about "The Holidays Inns" when referring to a single hotel rather than the chain.

There are also much confusions between singular and plural as here :

jNJVMJH5OhI

Caboclo
30th Nov 2014, 07:57
One of you learned types enlighten me: should there be an apostrophe in the word "finals", as in "the aircraft was on finals"?


Oops, sorry, aviation content...:O

Capetonian
30th Nov 2014, 08:04
Another infuriating piece of sloppy English, confusing noun for verb, for example :
'Driving License'
Here it is from the Daily Fail :

The BBC failed to advice users that they needed their network provider's default code .........

MTOW
30th Nov 2014, 08:11
One of you learned types enlighten me: should there be an apostrophe in the word "finals", as in "the aircraft was on finals"? Why? There's no hint of the possessive, the only reason an apostrophe should appear in the word.

I've never heard of being on 'final' (singular) except as in 'on (the) final approach', but there'd be no reason for the "'" if it was.

Capot
30th Nov 2014, 10:33
Tip of the day: "Y'all" is singular. The plural is "all y'all".

Y'all're welcome.If you're right, that should be "All y'all're welcome" or "Y'all's welcome."

That's OK, don't thank me, y'all's welcome.

Shaggy Sheep Driver
30th Nov 2014, 10:47
It's not a convention here to leave off the apostrophe in street names. But sometimes they still do!

Estate agents - I remember a lovely phrase in our local paper in a house ad some years back: "this delightful property reverses onto the golf course".

Handy for a lazy golfer who can't be arsed to walk there, I suppose.

seafire6b
30th Nov 2014, 10:54
And then proceeds to reverse the hole towards the putter!

Stanwell
30th Nov 2014, 12:06
The other use of the apostrophe is, of course, to indicate an abbreviation.
I have noticed that some people with spelling difficulties throw a few letters at the page, then add an apostrophe followed by an 's'.


Sallyann1234, where are you?
I would have thought that you'd have weighed in by now.
This is important, don'tcha know?

Groundgripper
30th Nov 2014, 12:17
The other use of the apostrophe is, of course, to indicate an abbreviation.

Is it? A full point is used to indicate an abbreviation - such as km. for kilometre.
A contraction, such as Dr for Doctor, on the other hand, does not use any punctuation.

But that's another can of worms.:\

GG
From sunny Lytham Saint Anne's. And yes, we do use the apostrophe - it's even on the train station name boards.

Keef
30th Nov 2014, 13:32
Abbreviation - yes, absolutely. In some practices, a full stop indicates an abbreviation, as in Mr. or Mrs.
An apostrophe does likewise but in a different situation...
You are -> You're
Would have -> Would've (no comment about "Would of..")
They are -> They're

and so on.

"Finals" from an aeroplane: a popular error. It's (abbreviation for It is) a short version of "Final Approach" so should be "Final", not "Finals".

Capetonian
30th Nov 2014, 13:41
Lytham Saint Anne'sThe apostrophe there is illogical isn't it? If it indicates a possessive, Saint Anne's what, and if it indicates 'is', then Saint Anne is what?

Gerrards Cross doesn't use the apostrophe.
Either it's Gerrard's Cross, as in Gerrard owns the cross, or, Gerrard's Cross as in 'Gerrard is cross'.

Maybe he's cross because the apostrophe is not used correctly.

Anyway's its time for lunch, I think I shall have ravioli's.

Dushan
30th Nov 2014, 13:48
I would of taught you'd have some wine with your ravioli's. Its customary and it's taste is good.

Democritus
30th Nov 2014, 15:00
It amazes me, in an aviation forum such as this one, how many people cannot spell gauges, buoys and Stansted.

For example:

.....73NG guages accurate to +/- 2.5% when tanks are full.

...which makes me think that these quantity guages are not very accurate in the climb.

With unreliable/unusable fuel guages, dodgy dipsticks....

Master has to be switched on to fill rear tank, so fuel guages show.

I wonder what the fuel guages were showing as he flew past Cunnamulla headed for Charleville?

...the burning question is still why? were his fuel guages indicating more than he actually had?


Learn your bouys.. You don't want to be mixing up your cardinals...

Would it be possible to drop bouys to listen for the CVR/FDR pings (in the right frequency band)?

KiwiFlounder has got past the old mooring bouys and heading into the deep blue..

….after you finished dropping bouys into the drink off Nowra?

Amazingly we seem to be going round the bouys again….


and as for Stanstead instead of Stansted :ugh:

chuks
30th Nov 2014, 16:48
In American English we say that we are on "final approach." Brits say "finals."

I prefer "finals," because to say that I on my final approach ... that's it, it's the Big One?

The MLA Handbook says to use a full stop for abbreviations ending in lower-case letters, but there are many exceptions to this.

I think that British usage might be to omit the full stop for contractions such as "Dr" for "Doctor," since the first and last letters of the word are present. The (American) MLA requires the use of the full stop for this one, however. Basically, you have to know who your partner in discourse is and then conform to whatever rules they wish you to follow. It's all about communication.

If you are told to "Report finals," then you say "Established on finals." If you are told to "Report final," then you say "Established on final."

If they want to see "Dr" instead of Dr." that's how you write it.

vulcanised
30th Nov 2014, 17:32
Someone in the F1 thread has just announced "I am pleased to here that" :ugh:

27mm
30th Nov 2014, 17:40
And whats wrong with that? :E

Shaggy Sheep Driver
30th Nov 2014, 17:54
From sunny Lytham Saint Anne's. And yes, we do use the apostrophe - it's even on the train station name boards.

Well, so much wrong there. Where to start?

Wrong use of apostrophe.

Use of 'train station'.

But what makes me think this is a wind up is there is no such railway station name!

Travelling towards Blackpool from Preston on the southern route, to Blackpool South, there is 'Lytham' station.

Further towards Blackpool on the same line is 'Ansdell & Fairhaven' station.

The next station is 'St Annes-On-The-Sea' station (note the use of 'the').

There is no such railway station as 'Lytham St Annes' Or even 'Lytham St Anne's'.

Capetonian
30th Nov 2014, 17:55
I was sent a c.v. drafted for a friend by an agency who charged her £200 for producing an absolute piece of dross. I wish I still had it.

Apart from containing just about every cliché known to man (all the 'You will find in me a dynamic motivated self-starter and energetic team player' .......... type of rubbish) it contained numerous schoolboy grammatical and spelling howlers.

I particularly remember :

'I possess a currant drivers' license'
'My intrapersonal skills are highly developed'
'I take pride in every thing I do in my private and professional lifes'.

She thought it had been done in India. I said that the average Indian would be utterly ashamed and would have done far better. I rang the company, I think they were in Chelmsford or somewhere (01268 telephone number) as she 'didn't want to make a fuss' and having spoken to a succession of Beckys, Vickys, and Traceys found the person who could authorise a refund of the £200 and who said : "We do hundreds of cvs a day and you are the only one wot has complained since I been working 'ere."

Groundgripper
30th Nov 2014, 17:56
Lytham Saint Anne's is, in fact, two places which have expanded towards each other and been dragged together into one town for municipal and postal purposes; the mediaeval village of Lytham and the victorian seaside town of Saint Anne's, which is named after the parish church of Saint Anne, thus Saint Anne's church.

Not many people know that.

Even less, care.

GG

G-CPTN
30th Nov 2014, 18:03
So it should be Lytham - Saint Anne's ?

chuks
30th Nov 2014, 18:41
How about, "Even fewer of those few who may know how Lytham Saint Anne's got its name even care about that fact,"?

That "Even less, care," is troubling to me. It looks so lonely, off there all by itself.

Capetonian
30th Nov 2014, 18:53
I shall look into the Lytham Saint Annes' story and report back. Ill be there on Tuesday (and its not to see me Uncle Ernie to thank him for my winning's)!

TheiC
30th Nov 2014, 18:57
At the College of Air Traffic Control we were instructed that a runway has only one final approach. "Finals" was regarded as vulgar, and reprimands followed.

Shaggy Sheep Driver
30th Nov 2014, 18:58
Cape - no need. Just check out the OS map. Or even Google maps!

Are you going to Lytham, or St Annes?

Big difference!

St Annes is a continuation of Blackpool. Far less Chavsville, but....

Lytham is nice. It has style. I recommend The Clifton Arms; not a pub (try 'The Taps' round the back of the Clifton for an excellent real ale pub) but a lovely hotel where service and cuisine are superb. I used to stay there a lot when my employer paid the bills!

Capetonian
30th Nov 2014, 19:19
Thank you SSD for the tip.

I have to be honest that I didn't know until recently that it was two places.

I am going there to visit friends who have just moved there and I am most relieved, reading your statement that 'Lytham is nice. It has style' to see on reviewing their instructions to me thay they say 'take a train to Lytham and we shall pick you up there' so I assume they live in the 'good' part.

I have, regrettably, been to Blackpool once. It was a memorable experience for several reasons, none of them good.

Pelikal
30th Nov 2014, 19:40
Gage, new word for the day.

1. something, as a glove, thrown down by a medieval knight in token of challenge to combat.

2. Archaic. a challenge.

3. Archaic. a pledge or pawn; security.

verb (used with object), gaged, gaging. 4. Archaic. to pledge, stake, or wager.

G-CPTN
30th Nov 2014, 19:48
Aren't gages (http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2008/09/01/article-1051337-027454BD00000578-804_468x263.jpg) green[/URL]?

G&T ice n slice
30th Nov 2014, 20:35
The amount of people what use amount when they should say number are terrible.

vulcanised
30th Nov 2014, 20:40
01268 telephone number


Basildon exchange innit.

ExSp33db1rd
30th Nov 2014, 21:01
I've never heard of being on 'final' (singular) except as in 'on (the) final approach', but there'd be no reason for the "'" if it was.

Would that be short final or long final ? There is a difference.

sidevalve
30th Nov 2014, 21:08
How is it that prisons are in "lock down" these days? Whatever happened to locking up?
And while I'm at it, I believe cars are now "parked up". Where did that come from?

Shaggy Sheep Driver
30th Nov 2014, 21:25
How is it that prisons are in "lock down" these days?

I recently attended a talk by a serving prison officer. He told us how the septics can't understand how a few unarmed staff can contain many inmates (quite a few very unpleasant, and some absolute evil villains) with few examples of losing control.

"We don't have them locked down all the time, and we TALK TO THEM" he said. Communication is what it's about, even with the hard cases. Doesn't always work of course, but most of the time it does.

But 'parked up'? I'll never understand that.

Pelikal
30th Nov 2014, 21:30
sidevalve, I have a feeling you should've used 'single quotes'.

Ken Borough
30th Nov 2014, 22:37
The use and abuse of our English language is fascinating, entertaining and, dare I say so, educating. The thought just crossed my mind if other languages suffer from abuse in every day use. So......do we have any multi-linguists in our midst who could tell us, in general terms, if languages other than English suffer from everyday abuse?

ex_matelot
1st Dec 2014, 04:37
Misuse of reflexive pronouns grips my shit. A "callcentre" mentality is gripping the nation where people think it sounds more higher register and elegant to replace you,I and us with 'yourself', 'myself' and 'ourselves'.

Capetonian
1st Dec 2014, 06:45
ex-matelot : Personally, I myself agree with that. Yourself can talk to myself about it.

chuks
1st Dec 2014, 08:58
There's a book titled LTI: Lingua Tertii Imperii - Notizbuch eines Philologen, by Victor Klemperer that examines the language of the Third Reich and how it has contaminated everyday German. It's available in English translation as The Language of the Third Reich.

For instance, you can still read about the Gleichschaltung (synchronization) of a populace, getting people to think alike. That's an original Nazi misuse of a technical term that once only applied to mechanisms such as clocks. It showed the wish to use the German populace in a mechanical way rather than as self-actualized humans, a gross error and a crime, but it's still found in popular speech.

goldfrog
1st Dec 2014, 09:19
I get really angry about the Merican's inability to understand the difference between 'bring' and 'take'.

Such sentences as 'I always bring my mobile with me wherever I go." really grind.

Ken Borough
1st Dec 2014, 10:33
I am surprised at the way in which 'no' is used. Yesterday, I heard a leading politician say, in respect of his opponents, "They have no policies". Bearing in mind that 'have' denotes possession, how can anyone 'have no policies', or for that matter, nothing? I would have thought that "they don't have any policies' would be correct.

Any takers?

Gordon17
1st Dec 2014, 10:39
I get really angry about the Merican's inability to understand the difference between 'bring' and 'take'.

I've encountered that one more with Irish people than Americans. My father is 93 and has lived in England 65 years, but he still gets that one wrong consistently.

JWP1938
1st Dec 2014, 10:42
Also lately: "Have you got any ???" Answer:"Yes, I do." Huh? Yes, I do got??? Yes, I do have maybe.
Another one:' "Can I get a ????" instead of "Can I have." Will think of loads more no doubt.

Andu
1st Dec 2014, 11:10
"I could of..." instead of "I could have..."

You see it here on Pprune remarkably often, particularly on the Oz at War thread from one of the superintelligent lefties who thinks he/she is destroying the arguments of all the reactionary old right wingers with his/her incisive wit.

Dushan
1st Dec 2014, 12:08
I get really angry about the Merican's inability to understand the difference between 'bring' and 'take'.

Such sentences as 'I always bring my mobile with me wherever I go." really grind.

Actually that would be 'I always bring my cell phone with me wherever I go'.

wings folded
1st Dec 2014, 12:27
cell phone

Don't tell me that they are installing telephones in prisoners' accommodation :E

Ken Borough
1st Dec 2014, 12:55
JWP,

You can but may not have it!

brickhistory
1st Dec 2014, 13:44
'I always bring my mobile with me wherever I go."


Why on earth would I want to bring a middle-sized Southern city with me?
When did you purchase the entire place?

And proper nouns are capitalized.



Saying "mobile" over here grates to most of us if the speaker is American.

We don't hold 'ferriners' to the same standards.

Dushan
1st Dec 2014, 13:54
Brick, by not capitalizing it, he probably meant this:

http://a9.wal.co/images/Large/298/798/6000187298798.jpg-2d13cdcfc4a277ee84947deae45a69c4a93b4184-optim-460x460.jpg

OFSO
1st Dec 2014, 13:58
I always bring my mobile

German's call them "Handys"

A Miss Noma if ever there was one.

OFSO
1st Dec 2014, 14:01
the language of the Third Reich and how it has contaminated everyday German

A question, Chuks: when I lived in Germany a permit which "washed you whiter than white" (for example certifying you were 100% Aryan) was called a Persilschein.

Very much a hangover from the National Socialist era. Do you ever hear this phrase now ?

GrumpyOldFart
1st Dec 2014, 14:09
When and why did 'bored with' change to 'bored of'?


And when did 't w a t' cease rhyming with 'what' and start rhyming with 'that'?



Confused in Canuckistan.

WeeJeem
1st Dec 2014, 14:48
The thought just crossed my mind if other languages suffer from abuse in every day use. So......do we have any multi-linguists in our midst who could tell us, in general terms, if languages other than English suffer from everyday abuse?

Yes, so much so that France has had an official institution (L'Académie française) since the late 17th century, to police the besieged French language and protect it from abuse. Académie activities include trying to protect francophones from abusing themselves by using loanwords (devil-words!) such as "le weekend" and "le software", pontificating on orthography such as the care and feeding of diacritics on capital letters, and generally being Nazis de la grammaire. :hmm:


Swiss-German, on the other hand, almost seems to revel in adopting and incorporating other languages' words, hence "Exgusi" ("Excuse me"), "Merci vilmol" ("Many thanks") and the evergreen "Tip-top!" used as a seal of approval :ok:.

Stanwell
2nd Dec 2014, 06:21
GOF,
't w a t' - I wondered about that myself.
I put it down to yoof or ignorance - probably both.

TWT
2nd Dec 2014, 07:42
Sign next to a supermarket loading dock gate:

http://i1340.photobucket.com/albums/o730/ratsclacker/WTF1_zps97b4e3ef.jpg

Bergerie1
2nd Dec 2014, 11:25
How should I explain to a non-English speaker the difference between 'to slow down' and 'to slow up'?

Capot
2nd Dec 2014, 12:08
Here's how;

Teacher: 'Now, class, today we'll look at the difference between "slow up" and "slow down". Ready?'

NES Class: 'Yes, please, O Great One.'

Teacher: 'For all practical purposes, there is no difference whatsoever. Use whichever one you like. Get it?'

NES Class: 'Got it.'

Teacher: 'Good.'




PS TWT - Are you sure that the supermarket's signwriter didn't mean "accepted" instead of what you think was meant? It makes a sort of sense.

MagnusP
2nd Dec 2014, 12:10
"More than 23 people were injured in the crash". WTF??

chuks
2nd Dec 2014, 12:14
To answer a previously asked question:

Persil was one of the first detergents, first put on the market in Germany in 1907. Its early advertising showed a young woman in dressed in glowing white holding a box of the stuff.

Post World War II many people needed certificates to show that they were not Nazi criminals as such, something that should "whitewash" them. (Many Germans had been Party members, but not all of them were heavily implicated in the crimes committed by the Nazis. If the Allies had kicked all the former Nazis out of public office and barred them from further employment then there would have been nobody left to run things in post-war Germany.)

The nickname for this "de-Nazification" certificate became the Persilschein. That is a compound noun formed from the name of the detergent and the word Schein, meaning a certificate in this case. (A driving license is a Führerschein, a "driver-certificate," for example.)

So the association of the word with Nazism is a post-war one, I believe.

What one needed during the Nazi period was a Stammbuch, a particular sort of one, a family tree showing that one did not have any Jewish ancestors. I was surprised to be shown a rather elaborate family tree by a shop-keeper friend, since that is the sort of thing that people in the States who like to boast of ancestors who came over on the Mayflower usually bother with, not someone from humble beginnings such as my friend. I was told that the family needed that thing in order to keep their shop during the Nazi period.

SET 18
2nd Dec 2014, 18:55
For me, it's a road sign. Every time I drive to LHR along the M4, about two miles or so short of the M25 is a sign: "road liable to icing" WTF?

Where to start? A road is not liable to anything; it has no will to do what it wishes.

If it did, it would be 'liable' to ice. Or flood (seen the same sign with the word "flooding" instead of "icing"

The road may be SUSCEPTIBLE to icing or just to ice, but it is not liable to icing. The fact that a government agency produces these signs just makes me sad...:ugh:

Dushan
2nd Dec 2014, 19:00
PS TWT - Are you sure that the supermarket's signwriter didn't mean "accepted" instead of what you think was meant? It makes a sort of sense.

Makes sense to me too. We accept deliveries here, but general public may not enter.

G-CPTN
2nd Dec 2014, 19:05
accepted / excepted . . .

Capetonian
2nd Dec 2014, 19:12
Should of ..........
Must of .........

Back to apostrophes :
Chester will be filled with Santa’s dashing through the streets to raise money for the Countess of Chester Hospital.Santa Dash - Participatory Event in Chester, Chester - Visit Chester (http://www.visitchester.com/whats-on/santa-dash-p188781)

TWT
2nd Dec 2014, 20:00
G-CPTN has it.

A supermarket will,of course,accept deliveries to stock the shelves ;)

'Excepted' is the correct word.I'm really tempted to modify the sign but would

be busted for vandalism,no doubt.

G-CPTN
2nd Dec 2014, 20:21
We had notices posted around the village outlining the changes to the hourly charges for on-street parking.

When describing the affected prescribed areas, they used the word proscribed - which made the notices nonsense (as there aren't any charges where parking is prohibited - apart from penalties - which weren't changing - and all the designated areas were where on-street parking was permitted) and therefore the notices were probably not 'legal'.

I contacted the authority, but they maintained that they were correct . . . :ugh:

JWP1938
2nd Dec 2014, 21:29
T w a t and twot...... When I was a kid all the comics used to call stupid boys in their pages twots. T w a t meant what it does today. When I was just entering teenhood, I called my mate a t w a t in front of my Mum. She was outraged and I had to say I meant twot so I was forgiven. I don't know where twot came from but it was definitely different from t w a t and was in common usage at that time.

Capot
2nd Dec 2014, 22:07
TWT

Nope, I don't buy that. Although it is very inelegant, what the signwriter could have meant was that although the public may not enter, deliveries are accepted; in other words, are allowed in.

He might also have meant excepted, as we all realised as soon as we read it, but I think he has to be given the benefit of the doubt.

Shaggy Sheep Driver
2nd Dec 2014, 22:09
Here's how;

Teacher: 'Now, class, today we'll look at the difference between "slow up" and "slow down". Ready?'

NES Class: 'Yes, please, O Great One.'

Teacher: 'For all practical purposes, there is no difference whatsoever. Use whichever one you like. Get it?'

NES Class: 'Got it.'

Teacher: 'Good.'

Well, that bollox would explain a lot. But I think you sell teachers short.

Speed up, or speed down. Do you really not see a difference? If not, I hope you don't fly an aeroplane.

So 'slow up' is an oxymoron.

The correct version is 'slow down'.

Ain't too difficult, is it?

TWT
2nd Dec 2014, 22:34
Capot:

The supermarket wouldn't exist if deliveries weren't accepted.

Anyway,we can agree to see it differently :)

Capot
2nd Dec 2014, 22:57
SSD - without wanting to prolong the discussion too much, your use of "speed up" and "speed down" to illustrate your point is irrelevant. No-one says "Speed down" as a phrase in its own right. "Slow down" does just fine, so that's what we say.

You might say "get your speed down", but we are talking only about an imperative phrase comprising the words "speed down" only, used as the opposite of "speed up". I've never heard that.

"Slow up", oxymoron as it is, is used commonly to mean "slow down". I have no idea why. So NES learners are best served by being taught that for all practical purposes, there is no difference whatsoever, without bothering with the pedantic semantics of it all.

Loose rivets
3rd Dec 2014, 02:01
Horses respond to Up, or ooop.

G-CPTN
3rd Dec 2014, 11:42
"Slow up", oxymoron as it is, is used commonly to mean "slow down". I have no idea why.Could it be a derivative of 'pull up' - not in the aeronautical sense, but in a land-vehicle sense?

TWT
3rd Dec 2014, 11:46
Egypt: Insulting revolutions to be criminalized - Houston Chronicle (http://www.chron.com/news/world/article/Egypt-Insulting-revolutions-to-be-criminalized-5931780.php)

How do you 'insult' a revolution ? I'd be more inclined to try 'inciting' a revolution.

MagnusP
3rd Dec 2014, 12:04
TWT, insulting revolutions are when you don't like the gyrations of the stripper in your local lapdance joint. Happy to help. ;)

TWT
3rd Dec 2014, 12:15
Ah,of course :ok:

barit1
3rd Dec 2014, 15:05
"One-year anniversary" seems to be a favorite usage among journos (both TV and dead tree) across the pond. As if this isn't bad enough, it metastasizes to

Six-year anniversary :uhoh:

fifty-year anniversary :{

...and now to

Six-month anniversary :=

six-week anniversary :yuk:

G-CPTN
3rd Dec 2014, 16:16
An anniversary is a day that commemorates or celebrates a past event that occurred on the same date of the year as the initial event.

barit1
3rd Dec 2014, 17:58
"First-year anniversary" is redundant, right?

"Two-year anniversary" is equally redundant; Simpler to say "second anniversary", eh?