PDA

View Full Version : Car idiosyncrasies


Pages : 1 [2]

ian16th
4th Dec 2014, 10:28
Ian, was the gas pedal in the middle? Yes.

Though I was tempted to say, 'No, but the accelerator was!' :}

Oh, BTW, that's a fine looking Elm, is it not? Though is that a lightning scar I see?Dunno, sorry the photo was taken in my friends parents driveway.

During the Suez crisis, one could drive on L plates without being accompanied.

I too took advantage of that. Driving tests were suspended to save petrol. There was a pre-requisite that your provisional licence had to be 6 months old, therefor assuming that you had 6 month 'experience'.

M.Mouse
4th Dec 2014, 10:44
Here is a picture of my Dad's 1951 Austin Sheerline. Quite a rare car even then. 4 litre straight six, weighed something around 2 tons and was a sister car to the more common Austin Princess. They rusted like mad and very few survive. It had some novel features like an inbuilt hydraulic jacking system which would raise all four wheels off the ground in about a minute!

I first drove the car when I was about 12 years old (on private land).

The photo was taken around 1965. The lorry belonged to a friend of my father's who was a local haulage contractor and he used to delight in arriving in a lorry outside our house in what was a quite smart area!

http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q109/AndyPandy_015/LorryampSheerline_zps570d5b4e.jpg (http://s134.photobucket.com/user/AndyPandy_015/media/LorryampSheerline_zps570d5b4e.jpg.html)

goudie
4th Dec 2014, 11:32
My dad had a 1932 Wolseley Hornet saloon. Six cylinders and o/head cam no less
It's idiosyncrasy was, IIRC the 3rd and 4th gears were away to the left, not sure if this arrangement was exclusive to this model

Mechta
4th Dec 2014, 11:37
My 1980 Citroen GSA hatchback definitely had a starting handle. The problem was that when it was sunk down on its rather tired suspension, the starting handle was so low you would have to get down on your knees to use it. I think I only managed to start it on the handle once. Later I had a 1981 GSA, but I can't remember if that still had the handle and starter dog or not.

According to the Haynes manual for the Alfasud I had at the same time, the Alfasud was built in response to the Citroen. The AlfaI had, in the 1.5 Gold Cloverleaf form with two simultaneous opening twin choke Webers (effectively a carb per cylinder) was by far the better performing car, but the Citroen was the better thought out of the two. For going up and down rough tracks on hillsides to hang gliding sites its height adjustable suspension and ski-like underneath were great. The boot had no intrusions and was just one big deep square hole, as the spare wheel was over the flat four aircooled engine. Also the heat exchangers on the exhausts gave near instantaneous demisting.

ian16th
4th Dec 2014, 11:56
When Citroen was a stand alone company, and doing its own thing. The produced some real out of the box thinking.

WARNING AVIATION CONTENT

In 1957, I was posted to the RAF Liaison party at Base Aérienne 125 Istres, this as a 20 year old, outside of the UK for the 1st time, was very eye opening.

The then new Citroen DS19 was one of these eye openers.

From that time, I have taken an interest in French cars, but not living there, I've never bought one.

Before I bought my current car, a Mazda6, I actually went into the Citroen showroom and discussed buying the C5. The attraction was that it was a hatchback and available with a 3l V6 motor. But common sense prevailed.

The French, and in particular Citroen, consistently fine a 'different' way to do things. The differences can be troublesome and today I value reliability as much as any other feature in a vehicle.

DType
4th Dec 2014, 12:52
Think yourself lucky, our Austin Sheerline's jacks stopped short never to go again the instant they touched terra firma. Fortunately just a test run at home, would have been difficult continuing any journey with 0,0 inches ground clearance.
Oh, and the steering wheel rim came off in my hands, only about 3 mm of the spokes entered the plastic rim, NOT enough!

Capetonian
4th Dec 2014, 13:39
The French, and in particular Citroen, consistently fine a 'different' way to do things. The differences can be troublesome and today I value reliability as much as any other feature in a vehicle. A friend of mine in ZA had a Citroen, in the 80s. Stupid bloody thing had a button on the floor instead of a brake pedal, caught you unawares the first time and stood the car on its nose if you weren't careful. Also the gate for the gears was 'upside down' so that 1,3 and 5 were towards you and 2 and 4 away from you.

Total piece of crap, over-sophisticated in an attempt to be different.

G-CPTN
4th Dec 2014, 13:53
My pre-War MG was fitted with the Smith's Jackall system.

http://www.svwspares.co.uk/special4.htm

http://www.mg-cars.org.uk/imgytr/jackall.shtml

goudie
4th Dec 2014, 14:34
The Ford V8 Pilot also had an internal jacking system.

In Cyprus a friend had a Citroen DS Safari. One day, on the beach in Kyrenia quite a few cars including his, became bogged down in the wet sand, where they'd been parked. He just raised the body and very slowly eased her out. It was an impressive and comfortable car but rather temperamental, especially the electrics.

Gargleblaster
4th Dec 2014, 14:42
Earlier in this thread, it was being discussed which side the fuel cap was on. Here's an observation of mine: It's generally on the curb side and the exhaust is generally on the other side !

Curb side meaning in the country of manufacture. British and Japanese cars are refueled from the left. If you're stuck and bored in traffic one day, check it out yourself ! There seem to be some exceptions, but this always works out for me in rented cars.

Here are some of the lows and highs of my car history:

Citroen Dyane 1974
My first car, my age around 18, car a little younger. This was a modern version of the venerable 2CV, actually a rather elegant design. Same chassis and mechanics as the 2CV. However... The chrome things around the headlights kept falling off and were costly to replace. Problem solved with a piece of wire, so could be reattached. The long muffler on the side rusted up. Problem solved by replacing by a pipe only, nice sound. At MOT I put my most innocent face on when asked about it.

Citroen GS 1971
It spent it's first 12 years on a stormy island, with resulting corrosion. Had to change the gearbox, which took 6 weeks in a rented DIY garage, half of the car had to be taken apart. Left rear brake stopped working, leaking pipe. Pipe couldn't be changed simply, as was coiled around the suspension axle. Solved by cutting it, bending it then hammering it shut. No braking on that wheel for the last months of its lifetime. Think no MOT last two years, resulting in police removing the number plates twice.

Citroen Dyane 1974
Believe it nor not I bought the exact same car back ! Now, all is well until the I beams carrying the chassis gradually weaken, just in front of the front doors. This resulted in the steering wheel gear occasionally loosing contact with the rack, so no steering ! Only car I have a bad consciousness about selling (although for a very modest price).

Then three Fiats, first an Uno, then 2 Tipos. First one was junk.

Citroen Berlingo ... why did I ever buy this ? Ah, kids.

Mercedes Benz C 220CDI (w203)
Current car. What a joy ! 1200 km to Austria for skiing is a dream on the autobahn. Still haven't exceeded 200 km/h in it, family gets a bit nervous, and the tunnel vision becomes rather unpleasant. Observing the diesel engine and the automatic transmission working together to provide maximum torque is a pleasure.

ian16th
4th Dec 2014, 14:53
Earlier in this thread, it was being discussed which side the fuel cap was on. Here's an observation of mine: It's generally on the curb side and the exhaust is generally on the other side !


Curb side meaning in the country of manufacture. British and Japanese A similar thread was once in the Honest John column in the Telegraph.
Though it was about which side of the steering column the indicator switch should be.

My comment was that in days of yore, it was decided by whether the car was basically designed as a LHD or RHD one. The result being that you should be able to operated the switch with the fingertip of the hand that was not changing gear for the upcoming turn.

Unfortunately today, the prevalence of LHD design seems to have decided that the switch is on the left.

Ancient Mariner
4th Dec 2014, 17:21
"which side the fuel cap was on"

My Skoda Superb, right side.
Wife's Mercedes A-thing, left side.
Neither originally for the RHD-crowd.
Per

ShyTorque
4th Dec 2014, 18:06
Unfortunately today, the prevalence of LHD design seems to have decided that the switch is on the left.

But my Japanese car (RHD) has the indicator switch on the right side of the steering wheel.

ian16th
4th Dec 2014, 19:04
Lucky you.

My last 2 cars, a Mazda 626 and a Mazda6 have had left hand stalks for indicators :sad:

victor tango
4th Dec 2014, 19:17
Bought some de-humidifier bags and put them on the dash.
Blimey, they are really good....the air in the car was so dry I had to go down the pub I was that parched:rolleyes:

ian16th
4th Dec 2014, 19:41
Bought some de-humidifier bags and put them on the dash.
Blimey, they are really good....the air in the car was so dry I had to go down the pub I was that parchedI wonder how long they'd last on the Natal south coast?

About 2 hours??

Shaggy Sheep Driver
4th Dec 2014, 20:24
Citroen Dyane 1974
My first car, my age around 18, car a little younger. This was a modern version of the venerable 2CV, actually a rather elegant design. Same chassis and mechanics as the 2CV. However... The chrome things around the headlights kept falling off and were costly to replace. Problem solved with a piece of wire, so could be reattached. The long muffler on the side rusted up. Problem solved by replacing by a pipe only, nice sound. At MOT I put my most innocent face on when asked about it.

Citroen GS 1971
It spent it's first 12 years on a stormy island, with resulting corrosion. Had to change the gearbox, which took 6 weeks in a rented DIY garage, half of the car had to be taken apart. Left rear brake stopped working, leaking pipe. Pipe couldn't be changed simply, as was coiled around the suspension axle. Solved by cutting it, bending it then hammering it shut. No braking on that wheel for the last months of its lifetime. Think no MOT last two years, resulting in police removing the number plates twice.

Citroen Dyane 1974
Believe it nor not I bought the exact same car back ! Now, all is well until the I beams carrying the chassis gradually weaken, just in front of the front doors. This resulted in the steering wheel gear occasionally loosing contact with the rack, so no steering ! Only car I have a bad consciousness about selling (although for a very modest price).

Then three Fiats, first an Uno, then 2 Tipos. First one was junk.

Citroen Berlingo ... why did I ever buy this ? Ah, kids.

French cars? The only mystery here is why you just kept on buying French cars? Oh, and 3 Fiats!

If you want a car that works, Japanese or German.

If you want something that will fail regularly, French or Italian.

gupta
4th Dec 2014, 21:08
Ian16 has the measure of it - indicator on opposite side to gear shift in normal configuration. Where it goes astray is in the conversion to RHD (doesn't seem to happen the other way round). For economy's sake, the whole steering column gets lifted over to the RHS holus bolus, & voila - the indicator stalk stays on the left. Bugger ergonomics, cheapness rules.

It now leads to the belief among the Europhilic car owners that the indicator on the left is the preferred option on a RHD car.:ugh:

Mind you, as GCPTN would surely recall, many British cars had the indicator system either on the steering wheel hub, or in the centre of the dash. I recall one of the centre systems being clockwork-cancelling.

ShyTorque
4th Dec 2014, 21:13
Lucky you.

Not too sure about that. Confusing when your other car has them on the left.

vulcanised
4th Dec 2014, 21:26
one of the centre systems being clockwork-cancelling

Austin A40.

ShyTorque
4th Dec 2014, 21:47
A30/35 too, I think. I was too young to drive but my uncle had one. Registration number was VRB 278. That was about 50 years ago so I'm quite surprised I remember it.

seacue
4th Dec 2014, 23:00
MG A. Timer (middle of dash) always ran out too soon. A REAL nuisance.

AtomKraft
5th Dec 2014, 04:04
Vulcanised.
I rebuilt an A40 Countryman. A mark one. (Where are you YFS 176?).

Had to repair the central indicator switch, and it's not clockwork.

There was some sort of friction, sticky mechanism inside, I think based on suction.
So you pushed the lever over, and it just sort of eased back to centre over about 20 seconds.

joy ride
5th Dec 2014, 08:18
Who needs air conditioning?

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=hanomag+kommissbrot+wicker+body&biw=1024&bih=475&tbm=isch&imgil=wq-NhkdK2JnR-M%253A%253BSfBxWTQ6Mro_KM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.o ldwoodies.com%25252Fgallery-wicker.htm&source=iu&pf=m&fir=wq-NhkdK2JnR-M%253A%252CSfBxWTQ6Mro_KM%252C_&usg=__PxpGCOhd5gt6WG4wfUfqmmSvGcY%3D&ved=0CD0Qyjc&ei=7neBVKywJ4iU7Ab1y4Bo#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=1OkRjdH0ym3f_M%253A%3BSfBxWTQ6Mro_KM%3Bhttp%253A%252F% 252Fwww.oldwoodies.com%252Fimg%252Fworld%252Fhanomag.jpg%3Bh ttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.oldwoodies.com%252Fgallery-wicker.htm%3B378%3B247

goudie
5th Dec 2014, 08:24
If you want a car that works, Japanese or German.

I've owned 3 German cars. Golf, BMW 3Series and a Merc A class. They all performed well but reliability was not especially exceptional and repairs were very expensive.
The worst car I've owned, for reliability and expense, was the Merc A Class 160. Bought with 9k on the clock it was very pleasant to drive but at 30k the rear swing arm bearings failed. According to my local garage they were very poorly made.
Although the bearing themselves are quite inexpensive you couldn't buy them separately and had to buy the complete swing arm ass., cost, just under £500!
Then the steering jammed at 45k! (I was lucky not to have had an accident) To convert from LH to RH drive, complicated universal joints were used between the steering box and the column. The one at the bottom of the column jammed. Again you couldn't buy just the joint, the complete steering column had to be purchased.
The Merc. garage from where I bought it wanted £1700 to fix it and weren't interested in the fact that the steering was potentially dangerous and should be flagged up to the Mercs Head Office.
My local garage did it for £1000.
I traded it in for a new Focus which served me well for 8 years and my daughter for two years. I have driven a Fiesta for the last 2 1/2 yrs and it is brilliant.
Mrs G had a Honda for a number of years and that too was an excellent car.

cattletruck
7th Dec 2014, 11:34
Hate cars where you have to put your foot on the brake and wear your seat belt before it can be started.

It's like saying brain death is acceptable when driving a car.

ian16th
7th Dec 2014, 12:18
Hate cars where you have to put your foot on the brake and wear your seat belt before it can be started.A couple oddities that I came across, of course on hire cars.

A Hyundai that need the clutch pedal pushed down before the starter would operate. This car didn't come with a hand book.

In the western colonies, a Ford Thunderbird that was supposed to have a knob on the dash that released the parking brake. On reading the fine print of the handbook I found a note that as an option, this might be automatically released when putting the 'shift' into drive. My car was of course fitted with this option!

Why do these things happen when you are a stranger, don't know the local geography, have a car that you have never looked at as you would never consider buying that model and your main worry is remembering to drive on the wrong side of the road?

Shaggy Sheep Driver
7th Dec 2014, 13:01
Who needs air conditioning?

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=ha...tm%3B378%3B247

My electric-hard-top MX5 has aircon and I wouldn't be without it. It's useful on a hot day with the top down to keep yer tootsies cool, and it's even more useful on a wet day when you set off 2-up with the roof up, for instantly clearing misted-up windows.

ShyTorque
7th Dec 2014, 14:10
For someone so macho and particular about what he flies, it must be pointed out than the MX-5 is well known as the ultimate hairdressers' car. :p

Shaggy Sheep Driver
7th Dec 2014, 15:45
For someone so macho and particular about what he flies, it must be pointed out than the MX-5 is well known as the ultimate hairdressers' car.

Only by the ignorant.

I'm particular about flying aeroplanes (where possible) with superb handling. Same applies to my cars. And if they cost Ford Focus money to buy and to run and the only boring thing about them is their rock solid reliability, so much the better. :ok:

The real hairdresser's car is the Audi TT, anyway. ;)

seacue
7th Dec 2014, 15:56
I look upon the MX-5 as what a British sports car would be today if the Brits still made them --- and they had become reliable.

Shaggy Sheep Driver
7th Dec 2014, 16:21
Indeed. Mazda were pretty smart in observing that, and noting there was no updated equivalent of those cars then available. So they produced a high quality 2-seat sports car very much like the Lotus Elan, but cheap and well made. Superb handling, moderate power for low purchase and running costs, affordable, reliable, great fun!

Dr Jekyll
7th Dec 2014, 16:32
Jeremy Clarkson actually made a reasonable point about the MX5. He suggested it WAS a British Sports car, just as a curry made in Birmingham is still Indian food.

John Hill
7th Dec 2014, 18:58
http://www.carsfotodb.com/uploads/almac/almac-roadster/almac-roadster-01.jpg

I still have the felt pens marks on the garage floor where the chassis was laid out.

ShyTorque
7th Dec 2014, 20:21
Typical British name...Mazda. But air con and a hard top on a sports car? Whatever next? :eek:

SSD, hope you got a pair of proper on/off switches, to replace that dreadful key operated ignition switch. :p

John Hill
7th Dec 2014, 20:39
One does can not drive far with the top down on hot sunny days so air con or at least good forced air ventilation is almost essential.

ian16th
7th Dec 2014, 21:00
Seriously, I find the combination of aircon and a sunroof, the quickest way to cool the car down, after it has been parked in the sun.

The fact that hot air rises is beautifully illustrated! And the aircon fills the car with cool air from foot level upwards.:cool:

What a time to use the 'cool' icon :)

Once cooled, I shut the roof to reduce the noise.

Shaggy Sheep Driver
7th Dec 2014, 21:07
Shy, electric FOLDING (by pressing a button) hard top. Very civilised.

And the hard roof folds automatically into the same space the canvas hood resides in in MX5s with that simpler option. Looks better than a rag top roof down or up, and when up it's quiet like a coupe.

http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b132/GZK6NK/DSC02382cr1res.jpg

Ian16th, yes I was dubious about aircon in an open car until I tried it. My previous Mk2 MX5 didn't have it. Wouldn't be without now!

aerobelly
7th Dec 2014, 21:24
But air con and a hard top on a sports car? Whatever next?

You forget that the Lotus Elan's predecessor the Elite came only in coupe stylee. I don't think anyone could argue that the Elite was not extremely sporty. The looks, the smell (of oil and hot fibreglass), the sound as the engine wound up to 7,500 (in 1957 already), it could outcorner and outbrake anything else on the road. Only thing missing was that it couldn't out-drag a Jag or Big Healey.

But idiosyncrasies, oh yes it had some. OK, a lot. I loved mine though.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/15549581172/


'b

cockney steve
8th Dec 2014, 11:12
the smell (of oil and hot fibreglass), the sound as the
.....rear suspension struts burst their mountings and ejected the back window upon the road.....Ah, Yes, The lotus Elite.!

Burnt Fishtrousers
8th Dec 2014, 13:19
The early Mk1 GT6s were worse than the Spitfires for handling with more power and extra weight of the 6cyl lump up front.

My Mk3 had the rubber doughnut Rotoflex couplings ( used in the Elan) which used to perish and give the car interesting acceleration characteristics.

The "seat belt butlers" on an old W124 Merc pillar less coupe used to have a mind of their own. Some times withdrawing before I'd had chance to grab the buckle, sometimes sliding out whilst driving along, and sometimes never at all.

The drain holes on a Mk1 MX5 had to be rodded out once a month to stop the foot well filling with water..loved it though best sports car I ever had

A very rough running TR6 after lots of diagnosis had a perished fuel pump mount which made for rough running. It churned up the fuel so much air bubbles caused the rough running issue..

And of course a 2 year old C5 estate where the DPF light goes on regularly ( well it did before it was sorted). Turns out there's this special fluid that's used to keep the DPF clean which needs replacing every 100,000 miles or so. it appears Citroens and some Fords are the only manufacturer to employ this "wet system" that squirts a bit of fluid into the DPF every time the filler cap is closed....means you don't have to have a hot running car to burn off the deposits which is good for the short journey commuter.

Ancient Observer
8th Dec 2014, 13:29
The prize goes to


Lotus Élan.

MagnusP
8th Dec 2014, 13:50
Mind you, the MGC took some beating for idiocy. Overpowered for the chassis, ugly as your worst nightmare mother-in-law, and steered like a barge on castors.

G-CPTN
8th Dec 2014, 14:25
I was running-in a racing saloon car at Silverstone when the first MGC was being hammered round the the track. Although my vehicle had a much smaller capacity engine (1200cc) I was able to overtake the C as it had to slow to take the corners (particularly Woodcote) due to its horrendous understeer caused by the heavy lump of the engine.
We couldn't believe that any major manufacturer would release a vehicle with such appalling handling characteristics.

Also there that day was a superb Maserati 250F (though it seemed to have some sort of engine problem that restricted its running).

Fareastdriver
8th Dec 2014, 15:44
I had one of the last, if not the last, Capri 2.8 Injection Specials. No 1 modification within a week of buying it was a sandbag full of dry sand just behind each rear suspension turret to keep the back of the car behind you. That sorted out its handing though it used to lift a front wheel accelarating out of a corner. The LSD was noisy so I took a couple of plates out, it was then quiet and still seemed to work.

At that time I would drive from Aberdeen to London overnight. Once on the old A74M it would sit at 120, the fuel consumption was better than at 70, there being no cameras in those days.

The Recaro seats were fantastic. You would get out as fresh as you got in.

spekesoftly
8th Dec 2014, 15:49
the MGC took some beating for idiocy.Although it didn't stop Rover from trying again with the MG RV8. About 2000 built between 1993 - 95, and the cost had risen to circa £26,000.

seacue
8th Dec 2014, 15:58
But air con and a hard top on a sports car? Whatever next? That is a symptom of why earlier British cars didn't do well in foreign markets. Their makers apparently couldn't believe the high temperatures and long distances between towns (and repair shops) in OZ, SA and the USA. Then the Japanese and Koreans arrived.

ian16th
8th Dec 2014, 18:49
Their makers apparently couldn't believe the high temperatures and long distances between towns (and repair shops) in OZ, SA and the USA.This is now a problem with spare wheels!

All of the alternatives, be they 'emergency spares', run flats or an aerosol of gunk, are only good for a very limited distance at limited speed. Something like, not more than 80KPH for 50KM.

Now the real reason for eliminating the traditional full size spare is to save weight. This in turn improves the power to weight ratio. And again in turn better pollution numbers, and the benefits that so accrue. Lower tax rates etc.

All of which is utterly meaningless when you have a blowout 150km from anywhere.

I've said earlier on this thread that my current car is a Mazda6, when I 1st ordered it I ordered the Mazda6 MPS, the 4 wheel drive one with the turbo-charged motor.

Then I discovered that it came without a full sized spare wheel. Not only that, but the biscuit thin emergency spare was restricted to use on the rear wheels and to the 50 x 80 limit above.

This was because the clever computer controlled 4 wheel drive would not send any drive to the rear wheels at then restricted speed! After reading this I went back to my dealer and changed my order to the 'normal' 100% FWD 2.3l version. It came with a full size spare.

To aggravate this problem, on most cars today that are supplied with an 'emergency spare', if the poor mug customer wants to buy a full size spare, he will find that there is nowhere to stow it! The floor pan has been pressed to shape to store the bl**dy Marie Biscuit.

Guess what? This is a pet hate of mine :E

But the MPS! Oh it was a pleasure to drive the 3 different demo models I tried :)

DType
8th Dec 2014, 19:21
Completely bamboozled by a recent hire car with alloy wheels and a full size (steel) spare which incurred the 50/80 speed limit if/when fitted.
And yes, all my cars have full size spares, and no, they don't fit in the well provided.

G-CPTN
8th Dec 2014, 19:31
What they fail to tell you is that that aerosol can of foam is only good for a simple slow puncture - any gash or split will not allow the tyre to inflate - and once you've used the foam the tyre is scrap as the foam cannot be cleaned out if you want to get the 'puncture' properly repaired.

Dr Jekyll
8th Dec 2014, 19:41
Although it didn't stop Rover from trying again with the MG RV8. About 2000 built between 1993 - 95, and the cost had risen to circa £26,000.

To be honest the MG RV8 was more a revival of the MGB GT V8 concept which had been a decent car. I think the ex Buick V8 was lighter than the engine in the MGC.

G-CPTN
8th Dec 2014, 19:45
I think the ex Buick V8 was lighter than the engine in the MGC.
It was! (and is)

ShyTorque
8th Dec 2014, 19:46
To be honest the MG RV8 was more a revival of the MGB GT V8 concept which had been a decent car. I think the ex Buick V8 was lighter than the engine in the MGC.

I understand the V8 was also lighter than the 1800 in the original MGB.

ShyTorque
8th Dec 2014, 20:11
Just replaced the remaing two run flat tyres on my car with normal tyres, for a number of reasons. I carry a dedicated repair compressor now.

Run flats do have some advantages, but as I discovered, all sizes are not commonly held in stock by many retailers. The punctured run flat will get you to the tyre shop but then you might need to be prepared to wait a few days to get a new one fitted. And you will pay up to £50 extra per tyre!

Also, the ride is very firm indeed. With number of badly potholed roads around these days, It can't be good for the car with already stiff suspension to be lacking the cushioning effect a flexible sidewall provides. Certainly my car's suspension was hitting full deflection of occasions. There is a lot of evidence of cracked alloy wheel rims caused by run flats, the road shock is transferred more firmly to the wheel itself. Crack a rim and your run flat won't be safe for any distance.

ian16th
9th Dec 2014, 05:38
The punctured run flat will get you to the tyre shop

Will it? I've never had them.

What is the normal sort of range? I understand that they maybe OK in the UK and Western Europe, but where we need over 100 km, I don't fancy them.

TWT
9th Dec 2014, 06:04
I got rid of the space saver spare wheel on my car which was speed limited to 80km/h.No good to me,especially when I have 60 tons of truck up my freckle wanting to do 105km/h in a 100 zone.

John Hill
9th Dec 2014, 06:23
Back to isosyncrasies.....

Triumph MKIII Spitfire, and I imagine most if not all of the 'Herald' family, had a spring under the gear lever that needed to be compressed to select reverse. The spring did not enjoy eternal life and when it broke the lever went down past the position where reverse could be selected although forward gears were selectable as normal.

I bought a very cheap Spitfire that was advertised as not having reverse! It could however be selected by lifting the lever instead of pushing it down, the owner didn't know that!:p

ShyTorque
9th Dec 2014, 06:33
Quote:
The punctured run flat will get you to the tyre shop
Will it? I've never had them.

What is the normal sort of range? I understand that they maybe OK in the UK and Western Europe, but where we need over 100 km, I don't fancy them.

50 miles/50 mph is the recommended maximum. Problem is, once you've driven on them "run flat", most tyre shops won't repair them.

Shaggy Sheep Driver
9th Dec 2014, 16:18
The Mk1V Spitfire had a cheapo rocker switch in the centre of the panel to switch on the lights. It was 2-position - first position gave side lights, clicking it down again gave headlights as well.

One night I was about to leave my girlfriend's parents house and pressed the switch. The 'rocker' fell out, one of the little plastic stubs that formed the pivot for the rocker having broken off.

I had some silver paper (metal foil) in the car so I screwed that up and shoved it into the remains of the switch, the void the rocker had fallen out of. All the lights came on so I could drive home.

Next day I replaced the broken rocker switch with a two-position toggle switch that worked fine from then until years later when the car was scrapped.

DType
9th Dec 2014, 16:48
We were cycling through Cambridge in 50s, behind a Morris Minor (or similar), when we found that every time the old geezer behind the wheel indicated left he turned right, and vice versa. Peering through his rear window, we noted that the stalk on the dash top/centrally mounted indicator switch was behind/below the pivot point. So to indicate left he should have turned it clockwise - and then the steering wheel anti-clockwise. The steering wheel obviously dominated his thoughts, hence the anti-clockwise indicator movement prior to each left turn. Maybe ergonomics hadn't been invented then?

The real joke is that old geezer then was surely younger than I am now.

Capetonian
9th Dec 2014, 17:08
My mother had one of these Austin A30s :
https://encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS4nWghAydTcBsruUltDn6Rr5BoqAvoSWTgGDcExVm ZV3BPaJ-w

Like most of them, it was grey, and my father christened it 'mouse' It had semaphore indicators and it was my job to hit the pillar between the doors so that it popped out. The control was a rotary knob on top of the dashboard with a red light inside it.

Why I remember this trivia is beyond me, specially since I can't remember where I put my keys 15 minutes ago!

http://cloudlakes.com/data_images/models/austin-a30/austin-a30-10.jpghttp://cloudlakes.com/data_images/models/austin-a30/austin-a30-10.jpg

MG23
9th Dec 2014, 17:37
All of the alternatives, be they 'emergency spares', run flats or an aerosol of gunk, are only good for a very limited distance at limited speed. Something like, not more than 80KPH for 50KM.

Ours no longer has a distance limit per se, it just says not to drive over 80km/h, and to replace it when you see the wear indicator on the tire... which might come up at 50km, for all I know :).

There is space for a full-size spare wheel, but then you have to remove the storage tray from the wheel well.

John Hill
9th Dec 2014, 18:29
Capetonian, nothing wrong with an A30, I drove mine from Melbourne to Cooktown then back to Sydney. :)

A A Gruntpuddock
9th Dec 2014, 18:29
"It had semaphore indicators and it was my job to hit the pillar between the doors so that it popped out."

I learned to drive on a pre-war car with semaphore indicators - very complex bits of kit which frequently stuck, requiring a hefty blow to get them started.

Did not hear the usual clunking and clicking so was banging away on the door pillar during my test until the examiner pointed out that the Ford Anglia 105 I had borrowed had flashing indicators... :O:O:O

blue up
10th Dec 2014, 13:04
Ode from an Austin Seven owner (Me)...

The start of the winter arises.
The ends of my fingers turn numb.
The battery has run out of amperes.
A massive great pain in the ***

The oil jets are clogged up with carbon.
The bonnet sure needs a new strap.
The brake cables stretch like elastic.
Why do we put up with this ****?

The sump gasket leaks like a good 'un.
It flooded my inspection pit.
The state of my financial crisis
is turning my life into ****

The rear springs squeak like a Field Mouse
I'll have to take them apart.
It's giving me bad indigestion
that is forcing me often to ****

The endless long list of bad defects
against all the cash I have poured
but at least I can sit here, still smiling
'cos at least I a'int driving a ****

Capetonian
10th Dec 2014, 13:56
Not sure if this thread is really the right place but as the petrolheads are looking at it, I'll try.

A friend of mine has a Lotus Elize which is the subject of a factory recall due to a high pressure oil hose defect which has the potential to burst and spray hot oil over the rear tyres and road. Nasty.

He lives in the south of France and bought it from a Lotus dealer in Monaco, which no longer exists (the dealer, not the Principality.) He has to drive the car to the nearest authorised Lotus repairer which is nearly 400 km. away and is uneasy about doing so, however small the risk may be. He has approached Lotus After Sales in UK and they are not prepared to make any offer for out of pocket, let alone consequential, expenses, nor are they prepared to pay to have it trailered to the repair shop. I think this is unreasonable.

He has a local workshop which he trusts to do the job, but as they are an unknown quantity to Lotus, they understandably won't sanction the repair nor supply the special tool that they say is required. I think that Lotus are quite justified in this.

They are being quite inflexible, sheltering behind their conditions of sale etc. My friend is adamant that he won't drive it that distance before the repair is done. He is about to contact their legal department but is not hopeful of a solution.

We have deadlock.

Any suggestions?

goudie
10th Dec 2014, 14:17
There was a piece in Readers Digest many years ago about a truck driver following a Morris Minor for miles. The truck driver wouldn't/couldn't over take because the car's r/h indicator was permanently out. Finally the car stopped at a junction, the truck driver jumped out went up to the lady car driver and enquired if she was turning right. She said 'no'. With that and muttering 'well you won't be needing this then will you 'and broke it off!
He was fined £50.00

Mechta
10th Dec 2014, 14:32
Run flats do have some advantages, but as I discovered, all sizes are not commonly held in stock by many retailers. The punctured run flat will get you to the tyre shop but then you might need to be prepared to wait a few days to get a new one fitted. And you will pay up to £50 extra per tyre!

A few years back, my brother went to the first showing of the Porsche Cayenne in Australia. Unfortunately in a demo to the press before the official unveiling, the thing had picked up a puncture. To make matters worse, there was not a tyre of the correct size in the whole of Australia, so the Cayenne did not move again for the rest of the event.