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View Full Version : People spraying stuff at you - it doesn't have to be chem-trails.


Loose rivets
26th Nov 2014, 10:31
At the yacht club bar t'other day, I started spitting nails when someone mentioned spraying passengers in aircraft with stuff to kill germs. As one who has steadily become allergic to all manner of things, I know what it's like to go into anaphylactic shock. In this case, it was caused by washing my hands with hospital soap - almost certainly. Anyway, the last thing I need is chemicals being sprayed into my lungs. It's hard to describe how ill I felt on that day in 2001. Now what do I see?


Geo-engineering: Climate fixes 'could harm billions'


Oh, so not much chance of special attention if it does affect one.

Ideas include aircraft spraying out sulphur particles at high altitude to mimic the cooling effect of volcanoes

Erm, that sounds oddly familiar.


How the bloody blue blazes do you make a desert more reflective?


BBC News - Geo-engineering: Climate fixes 'could harm billions' (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-30197085)

G-CPTN
26th Nov 2014, 10:38
I have never forgotten being sprayed in the aircraft before disembarking when arriving in Australia.

Shaggy Sheep Driver
26th Nov 2014, 11:24
How about polluting the drinking water with fluoride just because some lazy gits can't be bothered to make sure their kids clean their teeth properly.

probes
26th Nov 2014, 11:48
People spraying stuff at you - it doesn't have to be chem-trails.

hm. Makes one wonder in the lines of suggestive language... so, it doesn't have to be, but might? :E

Tolsti
26th Nov 2014, 12:03
I remember coming into LHR on Uzbekistan Airways in 1994 on an aircraft that had come from a plague area prior to Taskent and on to London.

Port Health came on board at the remote stand and after several PA announcements came round with leaflets for all passengers.

Then came on a 2 man team, dressed in what appeared to be NBC suits to spray the the whole cabin. We were assured that the chemicals has no affect on humans.... So I asked the guy in the suit " if that is the case why are you wearing the suit"

Let's just say, the reply was short and to the point!

PTT
26th Nov 2014, 14:19
How the bloody blue blazes do you make a desert more reflective?
Nuke it and turn it into a big mirror? :E

OFSO
26th Nov 2014, 15:14
Right........just glassify it........

con-pilot
26th Nov 2014, 17:07
Then came on a 2 man team, dressed in what appeared to be NBC suits to spray the the whole cabin. We were assured that the chemicals has no affect on humans.... So I asked the guy in the suit " if that is the case why are you wearing the suit"


In many countries in the world, when you arrive in a private aircraft, from a nice twin engine Cessna up a G-650, you have to spray the interior of the aircraft with an approved insecticide. If you do not, they will come into the aircraft and do the spraying for me, this you do not want.

After landing in one of these countries you had to show the empty can of insecticide to the inspectors and they had to be able to smell said insecticide in the cabin.

So I always carried a case of the approved insecticide on board any aircraft I flew internationally. When I had to fly into a country with this rule, before departure I would take a can of the stuff, spray most all (about 90%) of the can into the air while outside, then after arriving I would empty what was left in the can into the cabin and next to the cabin door. Therefore, when I would open the cabin door with the inspectors waiting below, when they came on the first thing they would smell was the insecticide.

Sneakily clever of me Id say.

rgbrock1
26th Nov 2014, 17:12
con:

And what is the reasoning for spraying this insecticide? :confused:

wings folded
26th Nov 2014, 17:32
Eliminate rogue brussel sprouts, of course.


Do I have to explain everything?

victor tango
26th Nov 2014, 17:44
gcptn

You reminded me of an occasion on landing in Australia circa 1967.
When we disembarked after the cabin spraying at the bottom of the steps was a shallow tray of chemicals which you had to walk through.
I beleive this due to UK having a foot & mouth epidemic at the time.
But we had routed Lhr-ist-bom-sin-syd! I would have thought any bugs on the soles of our shoes were long gone!!!!!!

Loose rivets
27th Nov 2014, 00:10
I'm getting angry again, and I want to go to sleep. The thought of my best shoes going through such useless stuff . . . Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrr.:*

Until recently, I had a pair of shoes that I loved. An unusual relationship I'll grant you, but not only were they comfy but they allowed me to levitate. I'd be apoplectic if some whittles Ozzbod ordered them to be ruined. I should have said I would have been, as they were destroyed by one of those de-humidifiers that you put in wardrobes while you're away. The little blue tub had leaked a bizarre goo onto them and they were gone forever. Mind you, I did get $500 for them at 25 years old. I suppose they believed they levitated.


You don't believe me, do you?

con-pilot
27th Nov 2014, 00:53
Eliminate rogue brussel sprouts, of course.

Wings got it. :ok:


The truth; the hell I know why.

Capetonian
27th Nov 2014, 01:32
For years they used to spray inside the cabin, a rather foul smelling insecticide, on all international flights arriving in ZA.

I can also remember travelling between Greece and Turkey, at the height of the 'cold war' between them in the 70s, by ferry from the islands and when you disembarked you had to walk through a tray of disinfectant. I saw a dog peeing into one.

John Hill
27th Nov 2014, 02:17
So I always carried a case of the approved insecticide on board any aircraft I flew internationally. When I had to fly into a country with this rule, before departure I would take a can of the stuff, spray most all (about 90%) of the can into the air while outside, then after arriving I would empty what was left in the can into the cabin and next to the cabin door. Therefore, when I would open the cabin door with the inspectors waiting below, when they came on the first thing they would smell was the insecticide.

Perhaps you think countries have this requirement because they like the insecticide companies? It is done for a reason you know.

Are you the [email protected]@rd who brought the varroa bee mite to NZ?

BTW, when entering Australia always tick the box about having visited a farm, slaugherhouse etc etc. then while you wait someone will clean your shoes for you!

Dushan
27th Nov 2014, 02:32
Perhaps you think countries have this requirement because they like the insecticide companies? It is done for a reason you know.

[COLOuR="LemonChiffon"]Are you the [email protected]@rd who brought the varroa bee mite to NZ?[/COLOR]

BTW, when entering Australia always tick the box about having visited a farm, slaugherhouse etc etc. then while you wait someone will clean your shoes for you!

Lemon Chiffon is the color you used to hide this? Really? Isthat what you really wanted to paint your Ford abomination in?

con-pilot
27th Nov 2014, 02:51
Perhaps you think countries have this requirement because they like the insecticide companies? It is done for a reason you know.



Yes it is, it is to collect the $500.00 to $1,000.00 fee, in cash, if you don't.

Been there and done this too many times John, I do know what I'm talking about. Not too sure you do.

Solar
27th Nov 2014, 03:05
This was regularly done on a lot of flights I've been on to west Africa during the 70/80s.
JH must lead and interesting existence if he believes in anything he posts!!!

John Hill
27th Nov 2014, 03:09
Been there and done this too many times John, I do know what I'm talking about.

Well then you should be bloody ashamed of yourself! Have you no idea what a country's biosecurity is all about?

mikedreamer787
27th Nov 2014, 05:19
[COLOuR="LemonChiffon"]Are you the [email protected]@rd who brought the varroa bee mite to NZ?[/COLOR]

Didn't know there was a Lemon Chiffon.
Thought the French liked Pink. I usually
hide my lines using white.

unstable load
27th Nov 2014, 06:14
Cape,
For years they used to spray inside the cabin, a rather foul smelling insecticide, on all international flights arriving in ZA.
Now we get sprayed before we leave LOS...

John Hill
27th Nov 2014, 08:58
There are currently three, at least, protocols for spraying aircraft. Spray with passengers on board, spray after passengers disembark and treat aircraft with long term insecticides.

Australia, UK and NZ are among the countries that routinely spray against insects.

cattletruck
27th Nov 2014, 09:44
Regarding the spraying of passengers entering Australia it's really simple, they use a can of NPA:

No
Poofters
Allowed

Works miracles....what do you think the blanket they give you is for!

meadowrun
27th Nov 2014, 10:24
I remember landing at Nandi in a 707. Door 1L was opened and in wafted a multitude of flower scents filling the cabin.


Then in walked some bloke with two cans of aerosol that he sprayed willy-nilly as he walked down the aisle. So much for flowers.