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View Full Version : I rarely bother with these snippets, but number 8 makes me feel ill at ease.


Loose rivets
25th Nov 2014, 09:21
Even at 1kps I'd imagine it would spoil people's day, but what if it came from deep space at a much greater lick? (That's a technical term used in astrophysics.)


Most we've seen, but 8 is an eye-opener.


These 26 Pictures Of The Universe Will Make You Question Your Entire Existence. [STORY] (http://www.wimp.com/universepictures/)

Flyingmac
25th Nov 2014, 09:42
Big round of applause for God. Must have taken him ages.:)

Ogre
25th Nov 2014, 09:49
Just, remember that you're standing, on a planet that's evolving, and revolving at 900 miles an hour.....

SpringHeeledJack
25th Nov 2014, 10:44
Number 8 looks remarkably like the Comet that Philiae just sort of landed on. I do wonder if this celestial body has been deemed to be somehow a potential extinction level threat some time in the not too distant future ? It has an orbit after all. :bored:


SHJ

PTT
25th Nov 2014, 11:00
Number 8 looks remarkably like the Comet that Philiae just sort of landed on.I presume the caption was your clue:
8. We just landed a probe on a comet. Just for good measure, here's what it looks like, compared with Los Angeles.
:ok:

http://beverly.crusher.wimp.com/images/sthumbs/2014/11/1f386173a8fad6008be195c5fecf1bda_UniverseFacts8.jpg

parabellum
25th Nov 2014, 11:13
That would improve LA by a whole lot!

OFSO
25th Nov 2014, 12:15
That green smudge is what North America would look like on Jupiter.

Do wonders for the place !

Solid Rust Twotter
25th Nov 2014, 12:27
That green smudge is what North America would look like on Jupiter.

Do wonders for the place !


Hmmm...

Does Jupiter need sprucing up that much?

goudie
25th Nov 2014, 12:32
And there's me and Mrs G wondering what to have for dinner tonight.:rolleyes:

Interesting and thought provoking site though.
Thanks LR:ok:

cockney steve
25th Nov 2014, 12:33
That big, black,gnarly ankle-boot would look well in a certain raghead territory. (compliments of Allah,of course!.)

Shaggy Sheep Driver
25th Nov 2014, 12:44
Ill as ease? Why? It would take a much smaller comet or asteroid than that to wipe us out.

What I found interesting about no.8 was how small that comet is. No wonder it had almost no gravity at all. which makes 'landing' a probe on it all the more amazing.

OFSO
25th Nov 2014, 12:49
Hard to wrap your mind around the fact that there are more stars in space than grains of sand on every beach on Earth.

It would be more impressive if it were a precise statement:

There are more stars in our galaxy than grains of sand on every beach on earth.

Now go and find some pictures taken from the Hubble and try counting the galaxies. Get a large piece of paper, a very large piece of paper, write the number down. Now assume that, oh, lets say, only 1% of those galaxies have - again, a guess - 1% or so of stars with at least one habitable world circling them. Multiply by the average age of those galaxies/stars/planets.

See why it is inevitable that life does exist elsewhere (even if it's a bit further off than a No 9 bus ride) ?

PTT
25th Nov 2014, 12:51
What I found interesting about no.8 was how small that comet is.Indeed. Everest is twice the height.

OFSO
25th Nov 2014, 12:51
No wonder it had almost no gravity at all.

I'm not too sure about this, but aren't there a few more factors than just size ? Material composition for example, or magnetic spin (are the Dirac equations now totally discredited ?)

PTT
25th Nov 2014, 12:52
Get a large piece of paper, a very large piece of paper, write the number down. Now assume that, oh, lets say, only 1% of those galaxies have - again, a guess - 1% or so of stars with at least one habitable world circling them. Multiply by the average age of those galaxies/stars/planets.Similar mental exercise:
http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/hand_sanitizer.png
http://xkcd.com/1161/

Shaggy Sheep Driver
25th Nov 2014, 13:03
No wonder it had almost no gravity at all.

I'm not too sure about this, but aren't there a few more factors than just size ? Material composition for example, or magnetic spin (are the Dirac equations now totally discredited ?)

Mass, innit?

mikedreamer787
25th Nov 2014, 13:04
Photo -

1. The atmosphere looks a bit thickish.
Its more thinner and tenuous than that.

2. Pluto is a planet dammit and deserves
its own white orbit outline thingy! :*

3. Looks about right - 239,000 odd sm.

4. Hmmm... different way of looking at it. :)

5. Move the Great Red Hoover over to the
left and that green smudge will disappear!

6. ....Six Earths? I think the entire Universe
has enough trouble just putting up with one.

7. Funny thing - if Earth had Saturn-like rings
we'd consider it normal and wonder what all
the bloody fuss is about.
Another thing to ponder is how human history
would've evolved to now had Earth had those
rings....

8. Looks like a fossilised big boot to me. Why
didn't the ancient ogre just flatten LA squat?

9. And yet its just a humdrum run of the mill
Saturday arvo garden variety star. Humbling
indeed. Almost wanted to see a speakbubble
pointing from Earth saying "Fcuk you!"

10. Pretty isn't it? But never judge a planet
by its looks though.

11. No wonder all the Martians do not bother
coming here.

12. Same with the Saturnians.

13. Wouldn't even register with Neptunians.

14. Earth against the Sun? I'd put my money
on the Sun winning.

15. I'd say the Martians would yell theirs is
unique as its the only planet where the Sun's
visible through a clear soft pink layer of CO2.

16. No, its not hard to wrap your mind about
anything - unless your job is to count all the
grains of sand on all the beaches.

17+18. NOW your talking about some serious
bloody gasballs!

19. If you shrank the USS Enterprise (S/Trek)
to a point where 1nm = 1mm, you would need
to fly that miniature starship at 350kts TAS on
our Earth to represent Warp 1 (c).

20. Gives new meaning to Google "Earth".

21-26. And all this is what God made just for
us! It seems an incredible waste of space and
matter (let alone Time) if he didn't stick a few
other bods out there.

34. Universe to Earth......"Oi! Shut the fcuk up
whoever you are down in that pissy little Virgo
Group!"

probes
25th Nov 2014, 13:16
actually, the 16, 17 and 21 throw somewhat off-balance as well (as 8).

tony draper
25th Nov 2014, 13:34
No need to feel ill at ease, we may be the only entity in the entire vast swath of the universe who look up and wonder at it,anything else out there may be utterly indifferent to the sky above em and just carry on chomping the grass,and you know what? I dont think the universe cares one way or the other.
:rolleyes:

MagnusP
25th Nov 2014, 14:08
2. Pluto is a planet dammit and deserves
its own white orbit outline thingy!

For some reason it has been redefined as a dwarf planet or plutoid. Buggad if I know why.

PTT
25th Nov 2014, 14:42
For some reason it has been redefined as a dwarf planet or plutoid. Buggad if I know why.
Why Is Pluto Not Called a Planet Anymore?
In 2003, an astronomer saw a new object beyond Pluto. The astronomer thought he had found a new planet. The object he saw was larger than Pluto. He named the object Eris (EER-is).

Finding Eris caused other astronomers to talk about what makes a planet a "planet." There is a group of astronomers that names objects in space. This group decided that Pluto was not really a planet because of its size and location in space. So Pluto and objects like it are now called dwarf planets.What Is Pluto? | NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/k-4/stories/what-is-pluto-k4.html)

tony draper
25th Nov 2014, 14:56
Thus removing the title the only man in living memory to discover a planet from Clyde Tombaugh,he died in 1997,Pluto was named thus by a English Schoolgirl who won a competition, after the god of the underworld not the cartoon character of the same name.
They would have probably called it feckin Elvis or summat equally daft nowadays.
:rolleyes:

SpringHeeledJack
25th Nov 2014, 15:27
They would have probably called it feckin Elvis or summat equally daft nowadays.

Way yay man! Cheryl pet is a good name :}

Regarding the comet, isn't it ice covered in dust and bits ? Where did all those bits come from I wonder, obviously someone in celestial bodies department forgot to do the vacuuming. To the astronomers amongst us, why does the comet have a magnetic field and why does it vary ?



SHJ

Sallyann1234
25th Nov 2014, 17:28
This is an old one, but still quite impressive:

Molecular Expressions: Science, Optics and You - Secret Worlds: The Universe Within - Interactive Flash Tutorial (http://micro.magnet.fsu.edu/primer/java/scienceopticsu/powersof10/index.html)