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View Full Version : For Christ's sake, don't call your dad . . .


Loose rivets
11th Nov 2014, 19:49
. . . and many of you may have noticed I never blaspheme, but this, I hope, would make God smile.

I also hope he smiles down on these bewilderingly brave craftsmen.


https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/VxlKZereog0?rel=0

dfdasein
11th Nov 2014, 20:19
Awesome!
:ok:

con-pilot
11th Nov 2014, 20:25
Safety harness or no safety harness, no way in hell would I do that.

Very brave and dedicated craftsmen they are. :ok:

goudie
11th Nov 2014, 20:41
Nerves of steel!
It's natural to have a fear of heights so I wonder how these men, and others like them, have the mental ability to deal with it.

Shack37
11th Nov 2014, 20:53
I got a touch of vértigo just watching the video:\

ricardian
11th Nov 2014, 21:21
That's a job that Fred Dibnah would probably have enjoyed

obgraham
11th Nov 2014, 21:23
That gave me the heeby-jeebies. And I don't even know what that means!

tony draper
11th Nov 2014, 21:30
Notice he was chiseling away bits of stone with peeps wandering about far below,[email protected] would poo their pants,a two ounce lump of concrete from that height would put a fair dint in the top of your nogging.
However let us assume he was just pretending to do some work.
Seen the time I wudda done that for enough money,just a case of having faith in yer safety kit.
Good clip though.
:)

pigboat
11th Nov 2014, 21:57
Well they got big ones, made of brass, but why a hard hat? :confused:

Checkboard
11th Nov 2014, 22:03
In the Grampians national park in Victoria, there is a rock formation called "The nerve test"

Grampians Nerve Test 2013 - YouTube

The rocks at the end are cemented on, so it's pretty solid - but there are no signs, no fences, no harnesses. The drop at the end is forty or so feet left/right and a couple of hundred ahead.

I did that once.

I don't know if I would do it again.

mixture
11th Nov 2014, 22:08
Safety harness or no safety harness, no way in hell would I do that.


Pah... you wuss .... :cool:

The leisurely stroll Loose rivets posted is nothing compared to this...

2A_h2AjJaMw


Or this.... :eek::eek:

hGoWjXVGt38

Capot
11th Nov 2014, 22:08
If he did fall, and was then suspended on the safety line, how exactly would he get back?

Climbing a relatively thin (12mm?) safety rope would be, as anyone who has tried it would know, out of the question.

Lowering him to the ground ditto, I would think, unless there is a sufficiently long rope ready.

I don't see how simply hauling him back up would be done. It's more than one man could manage, and would be very difficult for people standing/sitting on the statue. The chance of ending up with two people dangling in space would be high.

Then there's that technique - the name escapes me - for climbing the rope using little loops on the rope, or a mechanical gadget, for your feet and maybe hands as well, that pull up but grip when weight is on them, but it's extremely tiring and for trained athletes. I've tried it, a long time ago, with just the rope loops on my feet, and wouldn't want to do so again. But I am not and never have been a trained athlete.

Does anyone know how it's done?

TWT
11th Nov 2014, 22:20
What was he doing on the arm besides chiseling a gouge in the stone ?

Not replacing lightbulbs or installing another lightning spike

TWT
11th Nov 2014, 22:23
If he did fall, and was then suspended on the safety line, how exactly would he get back?

Helicopter winch ?

mixture
11th Nov 2014, 22:24
If he did fall, and was then suspended on the safety line, how exactly would he get back?

Knife and carefully positioned mattress ? :E

11Fan
12th Nov 2014, 02:42
Re: OP

What was he doing on the arm besides chiseling a gouge in the stone ?

Jesus Christ. Chiseling away and on the far end of the arm?

Did this man never see a Wile E. Coyote Cartoon?

onetrack
12th Nov 2014, 13:53
Those blokes must carry their cojones around in wheelbarrows. I mean to say - one gust of wind, and what do you have, to grab hold of??
In addition - I reckon that hammer and chisel should be attached to his arms with cords.
If I got a dollar for every time I dropped a tool into an inaccessible spot, I'd be well off - let alone dropping them 150 feet! :eek:

G-CPTN
12th Nov 2014, 15:24
Tape measure falls 50 stories, killing worker | New York Post (http://nypost.com/2014/11/03/worker-dies-after-being-hit-by-falling-tape-measure/)

Carry0nLuggage
12th Nov 2014, 18:01
I don't think he'd fall far. Just the length of one of those lightning rods :eek:

M.Mouse
12th Nov 2014, 21:18
It is all mind over matter isn't it? Falling 10 feet of a tall pair of steps onto a concrete surface is enough to kill you but who would worry too much about climbing 10 feet? Having said that I struggle to overcome my natural dislike of climbing a tall ladder!

mixture
12th Nov 2014, 23:07
Falling 10 feet of a tall pair of steps onto a concrete surface is enough to kill you

I once heard a story of someone's flatmate who slipped in the shower and went to meet his maker ahead of schedule !

Plenty of things at 0ft that can kill you !

G-CPTN
12th Nov 2014, 23:16
One World Trade Centre window washers left dangling after platform collapse | Daily Mail Online (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2831905/Terrifying-moment-window-washing-platform-collapsed-One-World-Trade-leaving-two-window-washers-dangling-50-stories-high.html)

Dushan
13th Nov 2014, 00:00
Right after they come back from the lawyer's office.

Loose rivets
13th Nov 2014, 00:24
I posted this in 2006. Just re-reading it makes me go into hyper-scringe.:ooh:





One was sitting at the table in my Edinburgh hotel room (top floor at the back) when there was a knock on the door. A young chap with bucket and squeegee offered to clean the windows. I looked at all my paperwork and declined lest it got splashed.

Back to log book and expenses. Some time passed and then suddenly there was a melodious whistling, and the noise of squeegee on glass. I very carefully opened the curtain a crack so as not to scare him. What I saw made my spine turn to jelly.

Without any safety belt or even a piece of string, he was standing on my window ledge, happily polishing my view into focus. We were at a ‘none survivable height', and he was standing on a ledge that was eight inches deep. IT WAS PEBBLE DASHED, SLOPING DOWNWARDS A LITTLE AND COVERED IN SNOW!!! Yes I'm shouting, it still gives me the sh!!ts to think of it....and it gets worse.

When he had done his task, he set off for the next window. Between each room there was a vertical plate of pebble-dashed concrete, around four feet in width. The bulk of this panel caused the ledge to narrow to about 2-3 snow covered inches. He looped his arm through his bucket handle and hooked his fingernails on the pebbles...then he was gone. Happily, his whistling continued as he made his way into the sunset.

John Eacott
13th Nov 2014, 00:45
In the Grampians national park in Victoria, there is a rock formation called "The nerve test"

The rocks at the end are cemented on, so it's pretty solid - but there are no signs, no fences, no harnesses. The drop at the end is forty or so feet left/right and a couple of hundred ahead.

I did that once.

I don't know if I would do it again.

There was no cemented stability in 1971 when I did it. And no, I wouldn't do it again in 2014!

No 1 son abseils down high rise buildings for a living, his disdain for heights now is noticeably better than it was when he first started. No doubt he would see the work on the Redeemer statue to be...challenging? :ok:

GrumpyOldFart
13th Nov 2014, 01:05
One World Trade Centre window washers left dangling after platform collapse | Daily Mail Online (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2831905/Terrifying-moment-window-washing-platform-collapsed-One-World-Trade-leaving-two-window-washers-dangling-50-stories-high.html)
Apparently they were rescued Juan at a time.

unstable load
13th Nov 2014, 07:24
I read somewhere that they were resurfacing bits of the Redeemer statue in Rio, so those blokes were probably doing that or prep work.
Seems that the lightning strikes it gets are damaging the stone covering.

Capot
14th Nov 2014, 17:29
In the 1960's, and for all I know now, The British Army parachute training course at Aldershot (P Company) included an assault course where one of the obstacles was two scaffolding towers about 40ft high, joined at the top by a hefty wooden plank 12 inches wide and 20 feet long. Naturally there were no girlie safety nets below it, just the sandy soil of the area.

Being required to run across this quite bouncy bridge was called "confidence training", and failure to do it meant instant Return to Unit.

I know of no-one who fell from it, although quite a few baulked and were sent home.

It's easy to see why it was so safe, if you put a 20ft plank on the ground and run along it. Easy, isn't it? The difficulty is entirely in the mind. But even so I found it incredibly difficult, and so did most people. I suppose overcoming abject terror was part of the training.

Fat Magpie
14th Nov 2014, 18:08
Thats my old job many moons ago in the UK, climbing transmitter masts installing antenna, VHF UHF and microwave dishes... we climbed with no fall arresters, only when you stopped could you clip yourself on.

G-CPTN
15th Nov 2014, 01:27
BBC News - World Trade Center: Secrets of a skyscraper window cleaner (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-30046663)