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View Full Version : Non Poppy wearers letter to his Football club


racedo
8th Nov 2014, 14:44
Statement regarding James McClean - Letter to Chairman Dave Whelan (http://www.wiganlatics.co.uk/news/article/14-11-07-statement-regarding-james-mcclean-2070059.aspx)

Must admit not heard of Wigan's James McClean before but having read his letter to his Club chairman I found his willingess to state his opinion honestly and openly refreshing.

He didn't attempt to hide or be a hypocrite and wear one just to go along with the majority view.

VP959
8th Nov 2014, 15:02
I 100% support his position, not really for the reasons he gives, although being part-Irish I understand very much where he is coming from.

I never, ever, wear a poppy. I do contribute to the poppy appeal every year, I do honour those who died for their country (some of whom were good friends) but I've always had a problem with conspicuous poppy wearing as if the damned thing was a receipt, and as if many feel the need to wear one to prove they'd made a donation.

I still get strange looks sticking money in the tin and insisting that I not be given a poppy, but that doesn't stop me standing to attention wherever I am, in silence, on the 11th hour of the 11th day, of the 11th month every year, nor does it stop me remembering friends and colleagues who died during the Falklands conflict, or the contribution many of my family members made in both World Wars, including my grandfather, who was shot down in France in 1917 as an RFC pilot.

Gertrude the Wombat
8th Nov 2014, 15:27
I never, ever, wear a poppy. I do contribute to the poppy appeal every year, I do honour those who died for their country (some of whom were good friends) but I've always had a problem with conspicuous poppy wearing as if the damned thing was a receipt, and as if many feel the need to wear one to prove they'd made a donation.
I have made a donation this year and am not wearing a poppy. In my case it's a combination of being expected to as a politician and ... not usually wearing the sort of clothes to which it is easy to attach a poppy.

When I put my contribution in the tin and didn't take a popply the little girlie in military uniform didn't look confused or anything, she just said "thanks".

funfly
8th Nov 2014, 16:28
Let us never forget that,certainly in the Great War, all those men did not 'give their lives' they were killed.
They deserve to be remembered.

VP959
8th Nov 2014, 17:13
Let us never forget that,certainly in the Great War, all those men did not 'give their lives' they were killed.
They deserve to be remembered.

I don't think that's the point here, at all.

The point is about the way the poppy, as a symbol, means different things to different people, and, I suspect, there is an element of "political correctness" in all who appear in the media, or have a high public profile, pretty much being forced to wear one.

Read the letter from James McClean. He makes it very clear that he feels as I do about remembrance and respect for those who were killed. Like me (but for a different reason) his issue is only over the wearing of the poppy symbol.

It is a fact that this symbol has been commercialised, and has become seen as something that all decent people MUST wear if they are to be considered decent human beings, and it is these things I'm uncomfortable with. In my view, remembrance, honour, respect and charitable donations should be private matters.

If you doubt the commercialisation aspect then take a look around at those selling poppies and poppy "memorabilia" of various types and see how much of the sale price actually goes to the Royal British Legion. I saw a "special" poppy on sale last week for 5.95, with a note that "1 from each sale is donated to the RBL". In other words, 4.95 from each sale was going to the seller.