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OFSO
6th Nov 2014, 16:34
'Irish alcoholism nature' reason for job rejection for Irish teacher in South Korea

BBC News - 'Irish alcoholism nature' reason for job rejection for Irish teacher in South Korea (http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-29929333)

Can we now reject job applications from Koreans because of their "dog eating nature" ?

racedo
6th Nov 2014, 16:36
I was thinking can we ban them from entering a pet shop as they only seeking lunch....

Ancient Observer
6th Nov 2014, 16:41
It's not the dogs that are a problem - it is the Garlic. Every dish is X grammes of, (say) meat, and 2X of garlic.

However, they are very, very nice people in their own country. I used to enjoy visiting. Technologically brilliant. Very progressive.
GDP per head in 1966 was USD 50 p.a.
GDP per head in 2013 was 26,000 p.a.

wings folded
6th Nov 2014, 16:48
Spike Milligan:

Many people die of thirst. The Irish are born with it.

SpringHeeledJack
6th Nov 2014, 17:23
Whilst the clumsiness of the reply was due to language differences and perhaps cultural as well, there IS a point to be made about the children of Tir na Nog when abroad. As usual it is the few (or many :p) who over imbibe and then become raucous and anti-social and this gives others a bad impression. No doubt the prospective employer had had a bad experience with a previously undisciplined teacher. Most of these 'teachers' are young and looking to travel, so probably lack the same control qualified edumacators often possess.

Whilst not against having a good knees-up and a beverage or two, it has often made me cringe over the years to see the UK and Ireland providing a majority of loud and aggressive revellers in various foreign locales.



SHJ

OFSO
6th Nov 2014, 18:31
the UK and Ireland providing a majority of loud and aggressive revellers in various foreign locales.

But the good side to this is that while they are indulging in the various foreign locales, the bars and pubs in the UK are that much quieter.

Frankly it's the nouveau riche and their wives with their braying laughter and iPads in the Eurostar first class who really get up my indago nasum. What, pretentious, moi ?

Checkboard
6th Nov 2014, 18:37
http://www.beliefnet.com/columnists/freshliving/files/import/irish-yoga.jpg

It seems to be a meme.

goudie
6th Nov 2014, 18:38
Let's not forget our Scottish brethren. A night out in Glasgow, many years ago, was a revelation to me in the art of drinking to destruction.

My favourite description of a drunk, from a book I once read....

'He was as drunk as a Glaswegian 3 badge stoker, celebrating New Year's Eve in Macau'

BenThere
6th Nov 2014, 18:48
Having travelled the world and spent significant time in many countries, I have to say I find myself most at home in Ireland. I find that the people are positive, welcoming, undemonstrative, accepting, and willing to laugh, enjoy a conversation, and appreciate the warmth of a new acquaintance, discovered over the pint of Guinness.

I confess I do have a bit of Irish heritage that might skew my affections a bit, but as objective as I can be, I love the Emerald Isle and remember it fondly, always.

Like the line, "Why do the Irish drink?" "So the rest of the world doesn't have to."

goudie
6th Nov 2014, 19:00
On all my trips to Ireland I've been met with only superb friendship an hospitality. Can't beat an Irish pub for a good sing-song either

I confess I do have a bit of Irish heritage that might skew my affections

My old dad reckoned that everyone had a bit of Irish in them, I certainly do, on my mothers side.

OFSO
6th Nov 2014, 20:00
As do I. Mother's family were living in Dublin in 1806. I'm probably 1/8th Irish and I'm sorry it's not a higher percentage since the ones I have met are lovely people.

reynoldsno1
6th Nov 2014, 20:10
Employment rules in SE Asia are relatively free from equal opportunity and discriminatory rules. In Thailand, job ads (corporate type e.g. banks) often quote required gender and age, indication of weight (i.e. slim) and even a 'good looking' qualification... These are NOT ads for the 'entertainment' sector :oh:

Capetonian
6th Nov 2014, 20:30
In a free market that's how it should be. Sod political correctness, BEE, equality, affirmative employment, and all the other euphemisms.

If I'm employing someone I'll choose and won't be dictated to by anyone else about this.

Unfortunately this does not apply at home as SWMBO would not allow me to advertise for 'a slim attractive young Polish girl who likes wearing revealing clothing, to help with cleaning and other light household work and offering additional services when the need arises.'

radeng
6th Nov 2014, 20:37
It can be self defeating. E. g. "Experienced radio design engineer required, must be under 30, slim, male or female and handsome, fully acquainted with European, ITU and FCC regulatory requirements and their development...."

No candidate under 40 would have a hope in hell of meeting the technical requirements....

eastern wiseguy
6th Nov 2014, 20:38
when the need arises

Doncha love euphemisms.

pigboat
6th Nov 2014, 22:44
At 68 I find I'm not as euphemistic as I once was. :(

Fantome
7th Nov 2014, 08:42
Maybe someday I'll go back again to Ireland,
If my dear old wife would only pass away!
She's nearly got my heart broke with her nagging,
She's got a mouth as big as Galway Bay.

See her drinking sixteen pints of Pabst Blue Ribbon
And then she can walk home without a sway;
If the sea was beer instead of salty water
She would live and die in Galway Bay.

See her drinking sixteen pints at Pat Joe Murphy's
The barman says, "I think it's time you go."
Well, she doesn't try to answer him in Gaelic
But in language that the clergy do not know.

On her back she has tattooed a map of Ireland
And when she takes her bath on Saturday,
She rubs the Sunlight Soap around by Claddagh
Just to watch the suds go down by Galway Bay.

Tankertrashnav
13th Nov 2014, 22:36
I'm half Irish (on my father's side) and I think I must have missed out somewhere, genetically speaking.

Can't stand Guinness or the bloody diddly dee diddly die music they inflict on you in Irish pubs :*

Pint of bitter and a quiet chat instead of the craic any day!

TURIN
13th Nov 2014, 23:09
Excellent Basil.
That one's going in the locker. :D