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View Full Version : How to stop Farcebook (and others) from tracking your every move ..


onetrack
13th Jun 2014, 14:52
Every been annoyed about internet companies that track everything you do? - every site you visit? - and then find dozens of ads popping up on the next site you click on, tied in to what you just looked at??

Well, we can fight back. I hate Farcebook with a vengeance, with their intrusiveness - with their "mining" you for free info, that they then onsell - with their totally one-sided setups (why is there no "dislike" button? - because they need to totally control the perfect image of their one-sided site). So I've disabled Farcebook from tracking me - plus a few others, too.

Here's how you fight back. You can have your site tracking disabled. Yes, you have the power to do this. All you need to know, is in this following article.

How to disable the tracking of your website history for advertising purposes (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/12/facebook-ads_n_5488980.html)

tony draper
13th Jun 2014, 14:56
It's not Facebook's fault,they are just following orders.:E

Limeygal
13th Jun 2014, 15:00
An easier way is to not use FB. Who wants to read an absolute load of drivel about people you don't know? Oh, wait. . . :)

tony draper
13th Jun 2014, 15:12
Well done it,it only allowed me to opt out of six of the companies listed,not very confident,my opt out of junk phone calls was about as much use as a chocolate fire guard.
:uhoh:

Lon More
13th Jun 2014, 15:18
Thanks for the link

It's not just Faecesbook that it targets LG
Just ticked everything, 30 companies, the only one I couldn't disable was Microsoft.

Tu.114
13th Jun 2014, 17:46
A bit ironic to see the provided link routed via Viglink.

A good adblocker is of help as well, it is possible to also block all that Google-Analytics, Faecesbook and associated crap coming along with many webpages. Also, not all the cookies that want to live on your harddisk need to be accepted.

G-CPTN
13th Jun 2014, 17:59
Is this not, perhaps, counter-productive? In that, by subscribing to the 'list' you are providing a means for them to contact you - which is why you shouldn't open SPAM as that acknowledges that your address is genuine.

mixture
13th Jun 2014, 19:00
How to stop Farcebook (and others) from tracking your every move ..

Simple. Don't join Farcebook in the first place !

mixture
13th Jun 2014, 19:01
which is why you shouldn't open SPAM as that acknowledges that your address is genuine.

You can open the email in source mode in many of the popular email software programmes.

But yes, if its blatant spam, then don't bother opening it in the first place if you're not confident in what you're doing.

Checkboard
13th Jun 2014, 19:26
I hate Farcebook with a vengeance, with their intrusiveness - with their "mining" you for free infoIt isn't mining for "free" info. It's a contract - they provide a huge team of programmers who design and maintain a website, which allows me to catch up with people too far away for me to visit. In return, I can either - Pay them money for this service, or allow them to target advertising at me.

I don't want to pay them money. Targeted advertising is better than spam.

e.g. - I don't have a pool. Advertising pool chemicals to me is spam - pointless. I am a pilot - advertising the latest pilot gadgets to me is actually quite interesting. The more they know about me the less spam I get, and the more interesting ads I see - AND they like doing this so much they don't want me to pay for their software. Win Win :ok:

If I use this track-blocking software I am back to looking at ads about pool chemicals. :rolleyes: :ugh:

Fat Magpie
13th Jun 2014, 19:44
A good solution I found is AVG privacy fix, it's a free download.
It tracks oddles of sites like FB and linked in and tells you how you disable the snooping on each site, linked in is the worst it even tracks your browsing habits when your not using it.

There is no such thing as a free lunch so AVG will try to flog you stuff but just click no and use it.

Sallyann1234
13th Jun 2014, 19:51
I use an entirely reliable method to avoid being 'tracked' by Faecesbook. The method is free and open to anyone.

angels
13th Jun 2014, 20:02
I installed an ad-blocker which worked, but it slowed my computer up a tiny bit which I found very irritating, more so than the ads.

I realised I didn't mind the ads that much so I uninstalled the ad-blocker.

Edited to add the only thing I use social media-wise is this forum!!

Sallyann1234
13th Jun 2014, 20:27
LiveLeak.com - DO NOT send this guy game requests on facebook...

Seldomfitforpurpose
13th Jun 2014, 20:28
By adopting the 'Ads cause me no offence' approach to life on the internet I save valuable heartbeats for things that really do matter in life :ok:

gingernut
13th Jun 2014, 23:15
I quite like Facebook, have sold 2 dozen bags of logs today, in our "local buy and sell group."

Ornamental cherry logs, smell great on the chiminea....

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v617/gingernut123/DSC_0007_zps05181bce.jpg


Decided to get a "smart phone" recently, that's far more scary, it keeps telling me how many "minutes it is from home."

It's not that clever, it hasn't recognised that I work shifts.

airship
13th Jun 2014, 23:31
Addressed particularly to onetrack and The thing: I'm increasingly dubious about the "free" and even "purchased" privacy software that is supposed to protect us from tracking cookies etc.

Installing such software may bring you initial relief (eg. it's always very gratifying to see that SpyBot has detected 'x' numbers of cookies and adware etc.) and perhaps they do serve some purpose against some protagonists. But at the end of the day, Quis custodiet ipsos custodes? - "Who watches the guards?".

At the end of the day, it's the companies who supply their internet browsers "free of charge" who are the ultimate "key-holders" to privacy. Presumably that's why they're "free", all the companies have an interest in acquiring our data for advertising purposes (or worse). My own Mozilla Firefox browser installation allows me to clear all my browsing history except for "Form & Search History" for whatever reason. Which is why I still continue to use IE8 mostly. At least I can delete stuff manually and know where it's (all?) stored locally...?! :uhoh:

rh200
13th Jun 2014, 23:49
So what where saying is, we want all the goody's and services of these sites for free. Do we think these company's have some sort of perpetual money machine or something?

Its sort of like all the wackos wanting solar panels and not disconnecting themselves from the grid. "Oh we want free power but we don't want to pay for the infrastructure that still needs to be provided.

As creepy as it is, watching these things at work, if you want to use a service, there needs to be a price to pay.

airship
14th Jun 2014, 00:00
I'd be the first to contribute several hundred dollars to a new and completely independent "internet search engine". So as to dispense with the services and abuses of Google, Microsoft & others etc. Ideally, the HQ and the servers of this new search engine would also be based on the Moon. And entirely free of any and all censorship, including DMCA and "take-down" notices. :ok: :E :mad:

Bushfiva
14th Jun 2014, 02:00
https://duckduckgo.com/ gets close.

onetrack
14th Jun 2014, 02:42
I think some people have missed my point. It's the deviousness that surrounds internet tracking that gets right up my nose.
Do you enjoy having your every computer move, tracked and logged?
This is all about personal privacy and openness in relationships between gigantic global corporations with unknown security levels, and yourself.

We've just seen that eBay can't even secure all its supposedly secure private data and passwords. What levels of security apply to our internet browsing record?
Who gets access to all my internet browsing and searches? - and what do they do with it??
You don't even get the right to find out. It's all one-sided, and it sure isn't in our favour.

AFAIU, you don't even have to join Farcebook for them to be able to start tracking you. The instant you look at a Farcebook page (or any website), they have your IP and email address. So they can start tracking you immediately. It's all Big Brother stuff, and we aren't in the loop.

I don't have a problem with law enforcement using surreptitious tracking to find pedos, online drug-dealers, scammers and hackers - but as an ordinary, law-abiding citizen, I believe I have a right to know just what these global corporations are up to, with their tracking and marketing programs.

Most online ad targeting is pretty useless, anyway. I don't know how many times I've received targetted ads for items I have no interest in - for items I have just glanced at casually - and for items I've already bought, within 5 mins of starting a search for, and finding the item! :ugh:

probes
14th Jun 2014, 05:51
dunno. It seems to me one's thoughts/activities are safe (more or less) only if inside one's head. The letters on paper could also be opened by wrong people, after all. And one would be seen doing things. Not that massively, sure, but still.

mixture
14th Jun 2014, 10:55
AFAIU, you don't even have to join Farcebook for them to be able to start tracking you. The instant you look at a Farcebook page (or any website), they have your IP and email address. So they can start tracking you immediately.

Erm no. If you don't register and login, all they are tracking is an IP address.

Farcebook and the other services providing products for the "freetards" absolutely want you to register. That way, they can properly provide targeted advertising opportunities to their paying advertisers.

Without your registration and login, all Farcebook et. all are tracking is basically a (very rough) idea of your geographic location.... the companies who buy advertising capacity on Farcebook want a bit more granularity than that though, and indeed its one of Farcebook's biggest selling points to the advertising community that they can provide that level of granularity !

rh200
14th Jun 2014, 11:33
Most online ad targeting is pretty useless, anyway. I don't know how many times I've received targetted ads for items I have no interest in - for items I have just glanced at casually - and for items I've already bought, within 5 mins of starting a search for, and finding the item!

Actually their not useless, otherwise people wouldn't pay good money for them. Its the law of large numbers thing again. If only a very small percentage hooks a punter, the virtual huge amount of punters means you make a buck.

david1300
14th Jun 2014, 12:15
I'm always amused when I read comments from people claiming hate Facebook and in the same post claiming not to use it. Yes, I use it. I have family and friends on 4 continents and its great to keep in touch and up to date. So they track my interests and 'serve' me ads related to my interests and internet searches. So what. It beats the news paper that 'serves' me ads I have no interest in. Come to think of it, its just like when I buy a magazine - it also has ads I'm sort-of interested in.

And you know what - I find Google so useful I also don't care what they track. They provide me a great service for free. And if I don't like it there are alternatives. And if I really don't like it all I can switch my computer off and not read all the whigeing. :ok:

cattletruck
14th Jun 2014, 14:39
Britney Spears has 30 million likes on feacesbook, that's about 28 to 29 million more than most accompliced artists.

So do you still think these people that track you and target you know what they are doing? It's a masses game and like the TV ratings system it's probably heavily fudged towards keeping the biggest paying sponsors happy, in fact it's essentially the way feacesbook makes itself loads of funny money.

finfly1
14th Jun 2014, 16:32
My fb ads are for train trips through the Canadian Rockies, tailor-made Antarctic cruises and lengthy Silversea cruises etc. If you ONLY click on very expensive ads you can have a bit of fun with them.

When unsolicited ads pop up on fb, I always mark them as spam. They ask why and I ignore and continue to scroll.

It has hugely annoying features and DOES sell lots of personal information (if you choose to give it to them) but as has been said, it does enable you to keep some contact with people all over the globe.

And recently, it has sometimes become the most effective means of getting the attention of a large corporation, like AT&T or a large legacy airline.

ExSp33db1rd
14th Jun 2014, 22:00
which is why you shouldn't open SPAM as that acknowledges that your address is genuine.For the same reason I never use an Out of Office ( home in my case ) auto. reply message.

And recently, it has sometimes become the most effective means of getting the attention of a large corporation, like AT&T or a large legacy airline.Farcebook is becoming more and more overpowering, many of our TV channels are now ending programmes by inviting viewers to "for further information, or comment, contact us on our Farcebook page ....." No thanks, I have to join to do that. If they can't be bothered to list a regular e-mail address then stuff'em.

And ........ I've just started to get some sort of advert from PPRuNE inviting me to join some sort of survey? Buggah off!